logo
Wrong email address or username
Wrong email address or username
Incorrect verification code
back to top
Search tags: Poison
Load new posts () and activity
Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2017-07-05 23:04
Five for one
Las Armas Secretas - Julio Cortázar

I understand now why this one is classified as European lit all the time. I haven't researched it, but I'm pretty sure this one was written after Cortázar left Argentina, because the five stories in this volume are all set in Paris.

I was not that dazzled by this too much at first but then, my bar with Cortázar is "Bestiario", and that's a hard one to upstage in the wow (weird, awesome, uncomfortable, puzzling) factor.

Cartas de Mamá, leaving aside the historical parallelism that some scholar or other wants to saddle on it, was an excellent exercise on revealing the past through the present. Many authors could learn a thing or two about how to do back-story. Of course, back-story is the whole issue here: sins and regrets that turn into silences, and that end that is half fantasy, half delayed acknowledgement. And the great opening line:

 

"Muy bien hubiera podido llamarse libertad condicional."

 

Los Buenos Servicios was a very scathing look at how moneyed people use "the help", many times frivolously, and often callously, and how hollow the "throw money at it" approach is, which is more jarring  (and ridiculous) from the poised view of Francinet. She had more class than any of the cast.

Las Babas del Diablo is a POV nightmare. As it tends to happen when I read magical-realism, I enter a weird state where I'm paying close attention, but at the same time relax my mind and just go with it. Like suspension of disbelief, but I just suspend logic and sometimes even grammar. I find it pays off with many complex or weird plots, or speculative fiction too. Triggers galore in this one, and one VERY uncomfortable suspicion.

"El Perseguidor", now here is the jewel of the book, and the point where I started to love this collection. It was absolutely engrossing. I understand why it has been known to be edited as "El Perseguidor y otras historias". This one got to me, emotionally-wise, and I'm not even quite sure why. I guess it's that desperate search.

"Las Armas Secretas" you know how it's going to go almost from go. Or maybe it's that I've read enough Cortázar to understand the clues he leaves. Or, maybe more, this sense of having read one of his before, about a big house in San Isidro, that has similar elements, but I can't remember to which collection it belonged to contrast.

You know, the more I write, the higher I want to star this. I realize it made my brain jog, and my thoughts come back to it whenever I wasn't reading.

Not his best, but for "El Perseguidor" alone, so worth owning it. I predict re-reads.

 

And there it goes my 4th of July extra. I devoured it, lol

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
url 2017-07-02 18:14
July Kindle Firsts (free ARC for prime members)
The Sky Below: A True Story of Summits, Space, and Speed [Kindle in Motion] - Scott Parazynski,Susy Flory
Little Boy Lost - J.D. Trafford
Secondborn (Secondborn Series Book 1) - Amy A. Bartol
A Beautiful Poison - Lydia Kang
Mrs. Saint and the Defectives: A Novel - Julie Lawson Timmer
Kings of Broken Things - Theodore Wheeler

Prime members get one of their choice free (not to borrow, the same as purchasing) ahead of release date.

 

Per usual, none mainstream published, all Amazon publishing imprints.

 

I seldom read memoirs, but I did select The Sky Below: A True Story of Summits, Space, and Speed  - Scott Parazynski,Susy Flory  

Source: www.amazon.com/kindle-dbs/kindlefirst
Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
text 2017-07-01 20:50
My Kindle First choice for July
A Beautiful Poison - Lydia Kang
Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
text 2017-06-09 15:09
Friday Reads for June 9, 2017
Just Mercy - Bryan Stevenson
Poison Pills: The Untold Story of the Vioxx Drug Scandal - Tom Nesi
The Silent Governess - Julie Klassen

My son and I have been suffering from severe allergies the last week or so. I am hoping two library borrows, Just Mercy: A Story of Justice and Redemption by Bryan Stevenson and Poison Pills: The Untold Story of the Vioxx Drug Scandal by Tom Nesi will help me power through the Benadryl fog I have been under. I have a BL-opoly roll for tomorrow to help round out my weekend reading; plus I am taking my time reading The Silent Governess by Julie Klassen, which I reserve for Sunday reading.

 

Have a happy reading weekend!

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2017-05-31 01:32
Brief Thoughts: The Perfect Poison
The Perfect Poison - Amanda Quick

The Perfect Poison

by Amanda Quick

Book 6 of Arcane Society

 

 

Plagued by rumors that she poisoned her fiancé, Lucinda Bromley manages to live on the fringes of polite society, tending her beloved plants—and occasionally consulting on a murder investigation.  For the notorious botanist possesses a unique talent: she can detect almost any type of poison, especially ones that have their origins in the botanical kingdom.

But the death of a lord has shaken Lucinda to her core.  At the murder scene, she picks up traces of a poison containing a very rare species of fern.  So rare, in fact, that only one specimen exists in all of England—and it was stolen from her conservatory just last month.  To keep her name out of the investigation and to find the murderer, Lucinda hires a fellow Arcane Society member.  Caleb Jones runs a psychical investigation agency.  A descendant of the founder of the Society, he is very good at protecting its secrets—and frighteningly good getting at the truth.  Immediately, Lucinda senses both a raw power and undeniable intensity in the imposing man.

But as a nearly overwhelming desire blooms between Caleb and Lucinda, they are drawn into the dark heart of a deadly conspiracy that can be traced to the early days of the Arcane Society—and to a legacy of madness that could plunge Caleb into the depths of his own tortured soul…



The Perfect Poison is probably the first historical in Jayne Ann Krentz's Arcane Society that I actually, really, really liked.  For whatever reason, I'm not entirely certain, since it doesn't stray far from the story lines of the previous two historical installments in this series.  Could be that, while I didn't really have any problem with the previous two books' characters, I didn't really care for them all that much either--I think it was the romances that didn't do it for me, even though I did like the characters as individuals.  This made them kind of 'meh' books.

But in this installment, the characters were great and I DID find that I really liked both.  Caleb Jones was not the typical, broody, alpha lord type, and he had a few moments that might have endeared him to me.  Lucinda was the typical strong, and independent, and eccentric heroine, but I also loved how readily she just stands up to Caleb in spite of his intimidating glowering all the time.

And also, the romance actually developed a little bit more ideally--it was definitely not a typical Amanda Quick formula, I'll give it that.

Meanwhile, the story line felt more substantial, rather than just being another add-on to the ongoing background conflict between the Arcane Society and that mysterious, secret cabal of rogue psychics.

As per usual, the book was addictive and easy to read; the side characters were also great.  And aside from some typical romance cliches here and there, I really didn't have a whole lot of objections pertaining to this book.

I DO like how we continue to see certain parallels between the contemporary books in this series, as well as connections to JAK's futuristic Harmony series.  It just gets me all excited!


***

 

Booklikes-opoly


In celebration of Memorial Day Weekend, the Booklikes-opoly Prison Library is accepting donations of up to 100 pages.

I read and donated 100 pages from this book to the Prison Library.

 

 

 

 

 

Source: anicheungbookabyss.blogspot.com/2017/05/brief-thoughts-perfect-poison.html
More posts
Your Dashboard view:
Need help?