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Search tags: Poison-Ivy
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review 2018-02-21 04:33
PEKOE MOST POISON
Pekoe Most Poison (A Tea Shop Mystery) - Laura Childs

Eighteen books in and the Tea Shop Mysteries by Laura Childs are still strongly brewed and refreshing!

 

What can I say about PEKOE MOST POISON that hasn’t already been said about the other seventeen books in this series? I think all of the positive adjectives have been used, and rightly so. The one thing I can say . . . the very fact that this is book eighteen speaks to the brilliant writing talent of Laura Childs. Her middle name must be diversity, because she always manages to make each book in this series unique.

 

One thing for sure that I can say about this book is, rats! Yes, like the rodent. Author Childs introduces us to the tradition of a Rat Tea. It’s a fascinating piece of history that I knew nothing of. (You’ll learn about it when you read this book!) It also happens to be where the victim in this book is murdered. Very original idea!

 

This excellent installment of the Tea Shop mysteries had a wonderfully complex plot. With more than a few suspects surfacing in the murder investigation, and business at Indigo Tea Shop being as brisk as ever, protagonist Theodosia “Theo” Browning, and her friend and tea sommelier Drayton really had their hands full trying to solve this murder, and keep things at the shop running smoothly. By the end of the book I was breathless from all the perfectly planned twists in the plot.

 

And as always, the fun isn’t over after the story is. The back of the book contains recipes, and Tea Time Tips!

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review 2018-02-10 17:25
Poison: A Novel (Dismas Hardy) - John Lescroart

I am not really a big fan of legal thrillers especially if it contains pages among pages among pages (you get the drift) of court proceedings. Especially the ones that they are required to do. HOWEVER! I do make an exception when it's John Lescroart. I love his Dismas Hardy series, while relatively a newcome to the series, I am hooked and look forward to reading earlier books.

This one had something, imo, going on in the wings. Was the author trying to tell us something about the series?

Well, I do know, whether this series or a standalone, I thoroughly enjoy John Lescroart's books!

Huge thanks to Atria Books and Net Galley for yet another approval to read a John Lescroart e-galley in exchange for an honest, unbiased review.

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review 2018-02-05 00:00
Poison Kisses: Part 3
Poison Kisses: Part 3 - Lisa Renee Jones They have one common goal. Survival! Happiness seems out of their hands, but temptation is an ever constant companion. Can their killer instinct survive their heart's desire? The danger is real. The attraction is strong and the heartache can be deadly. Cliff jumping is an adrenaline rush but a dangerous past time. Therein lies the thrill. Poison Kisses is a risky endeavor, but a rewarding experience.
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review 2018-02-05 00:00
Poison Kisses: Part 2
Poison Kisses: Part 2 - Lisa Renee Jones For Sage and Amanda the pieces are falling into place. For readers, Ms. Jones amps up the chase. The complications become more extreme as the danger gets more intense. Lurking in the shadows are the answers they seek, they just may have come to late. The Poison Kisses series provides edge of the seat seduction, that leaves the mind spinning, heart racing and readers craving more.
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review 2018-01-19 14:34
Words fail me
A Clockwork Orange - Anthony Burgess

Alright, there is a lot going on in this little piece of poison dripping, mind-fuck of a story, and I don't know that I'm up to the task.

 

First of all, because it's the immediate, I call bullshit on that end (I'm talking of the 21th chapter that was cut-out of the USA version; if you've not read it, this paragraph will make little sense). I read the author's introduction and explanation, and I more or less agree that our empathy and sympathy tends to grow as we mature (and we are more or less savages as kids and teens), but having read the book, I don't believe this level of inner cruelty and utter disregard for other people, or the length it was self-indulged and brought out onto the world can be called "a folly of youth" and hand-waived like that. I do not believe that level of monstrosity is something that can be redeemed, worked out, grow bored out of, and the person just go on to be some well adjusted adult.

 

I also do not know what is to be done with such a person to be honest, even if my knee-jerk reaction if I was the victim would be to kill them. Brain-washing into effectively loosing their free will does not seem to be the answer though.

 

Next: There is a very strong undercurrent of the battle of the generations going on here. The way money is treated, those articles in the diary, and the mention of day hour and night ours, and whom the street belongs to, and even, who has the power in the first part vs. the second, and what it consist on.

 

Actually, the three parts are distillate poison on abuse of power: young hooligans for first, then the police and other punishing/correctional institutions for second, politicians in the third. Everyone screws everyone over, and in the end I hated the lot, little Alex, and his little followers, and the police, and the jailers, and the priests, and the doctors, and the politicians, and the social fighters, and even his victims.

 

Shit, I wouldn't recommend this one, even if I found it oddly compelling *shudder*. It is interesting, and effective, but a vicious way to provoke thought, maybe unnecessarily.

 

Done. Onto "I am Pusheen the Cat", ice-cream and a helping of crack fics for the soul.

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