Wrong email address or username
Wrong email address or username
Incorrect verification code
back to top
Search tags: Pride
Load new posts () and activity
Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2018-03-15 22:01
Review: Pride and Prometheus
Pride and Prometheus - John Kessel

The first half of this is a lot of fun. Mary really gets a poor treatment in P&P, so I enjoyed getting to see her in a story all her own. But the last half was lacking, and overall, this felt like a pointless excursion with nothing to say trading solely on a cute concept executed in unremarkable prose. Every time it seemed like this might be going somewhere, it snapped back into the familiar shapes of it's source material with no added wit, depth, or delight not lifted directly from them.


And then, while I was still thinking about what was so unsatisfactory about this book, I read the male glance and now I can't disconnect the two. I cannot help but wonder how reviewers would respond to this same book written by a woman. I cannot help but wish I'd read the version of this written by a woman, because it would have had to be so much smarter than this to make it through the publishing world. 


Meanwhile, this is adequate for a jaunt down familiar streets, I suppose. But for that, it's less time and money to read the short story that this novel originated from.

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2018-02-23 14:57
A joy of a novel recommended to fans of Pride and Prejudice. Excellent for book clubs.
The Elizabeth Papers - Jenetta James,Christina Boyd,Zorylee Diaz-Lupitou

I was introduced to the work of this author via a collection of stories called Dangerous to Know: Janes Austen’s Rakes & Gentlemen Rogues Ed. by Christina Boyd, which I loved, and had also read a number of reviews of this novel, as it had won the Rosie’s Book Team Review award for historical fiction 2016, and I am a member of the group but hadn’t read it at the time. When the editor of the collection offered to put me in touch with some of the authors featured, I jumped at the opportunity and was lucky enough that Ms. James offered me an ARC copy of her book.

I’ve seen this book defined as a ‘sequel’ of Pride and Prejudice, and I guess in some way it is, as it follows on from the events on that novel, and we get to revisit quite a few of the characters in the previous one (especially Elizabeth Darcy, née Bennett, Fitzwilliam Darcy, and their family, although also Elizabeth’s sisters, mother, and Darcy’s sister Georgiana, and his friends and relatives). The story goes beyond that, moving across several generations, and the storyline is divided into two timelines, one in the Regency period (in the 1820s) and one much more recent, 2014. In the present time, we meet Evie, a young painter preparing her first exhibition and coping as best she can with a tragic family situation, and Charlie, a private detective, handsome, charming (yes, he would have fitted into the role of a rogue if he was a character in the other timeframe), and unencumbered by concerns about morality, who is asked to dig into a possible irregularity in the terms of a trust fund set up a couple of centuries ago. The case sounds like a wild-goose chase, but Charlie is intrigued, at first by the case, and later by Evie.

The author alternates chapters that share Elizabeth’s diary, written in the first person (and some of Darcy’s ‘official’ letters), with chapters set up in the present, from Evie’s and Charlie’s points of view, but written in the third person (there are some later chapters from other minor character’s point of view, that help round the story up and give us a larger perspective). This works well because readers of Pride and Prejudice (and, in my case, it’s my favourite Jane Austen’s novel) will already be familiar with the characters and will jump right into the thoughts and feelings of Elizabeth. I felt as if I had stepped back into the story, and although the events are new (as they happen after the couple has been married for a few years); I felt they fitted in perfectly with the rest of the narrative, and the characters were consistent and totally believable. Yes, they love each other. Yes, Darcy is still proud and headstrong at times. Elizabeth is aware of her family’s shortcomings and wonders at times why her husband puts up with her relations. She also doubts herself and can be annoyed at what she perceives as Darcy’s lack of communication. With all their humanity and their imperfections, they feel so true to the characters Austen created that they could have come out of her pen.

The modern part of the story provides a good reflection on how things have changed for the family, the house, and society in general. It also allows us to think about family, legacy, and heritage. How many family secrets have been buried over the years! While the characters have only a few traces and clues to follow, the readers have the advantage of accessing Elizabeth’s diary, but the truth is not revealed until very late in the novel (although I suspect most of us would have guessed, at least the nature of the truth, if not the details), and however convinced we might be that we are right, can one ever be sure about the past?

The writing is perfectly adapted to the style of the era, not jarring at all, and the historical detail of the period is well observed and seamlessly incorporated into the story (rather than shoehorned in to show the extent of the author’s research). The author’s observational skills are also put to great use in the modern story, and create a vivid and vibrant cast and background for the events. The pace and rhythm of the novel alternate between the contemplative moments of the characters, in the past and the present (emotions run high and characters question their behaviour and feelings), and the excitement of the search for clues and the discovery of new documents and evidence. The settings are brought to life by the author, and I particularly enjoyed visiting London with the modern day characters. Although there are love and romance, there are no explicit sex scenes, and, in my opinion, the book is all the better for it.

A couple of lines I highlighted:

To know him so well and still to be touched by him in darkness and light is surely the greatest fortune of all.

While fans of Austen will, no doubt, enjoy the parts set in the XIX century, the modern section of the novel is an attractive mystery/romance in its own right. I am not a big fan of love-at-first-sight stories, and I must warn you that there is some of that here, at least for Charlie, who is mesmerised by Edie from the very first time he meets her, but he does not have the same effect on her. In fact, he has information about her already (it is not a situation of love is blind), and he is taken by surprise as she is not what he expected. As we learn more about both of their stories, it is easy to see why he would feel attracted to her and her circumstances, as they are quite similar to his own. He was pushed into a business of dubious morality to help his family, and she has also had to cope with family tragedy, but in her case, she had the advantage of the Darcy Trust Fund. They are not copycats of Darcy and Elizabeth, but they complement each other well and bring out the best in each other. The rest of the characters in the modern era don’t play big roles but they are endowed with individual touches that make them relatable and distinctive.

The ending is left to the observation of one of the minor characters, allowing for readers to use their imagination rather than elaborate the point.

I thoroughly enjoyed this novel that is beautifully written, with compelling characters (I fell in love with Elizabeth and Darcy once again) and a joy for any of Austen’s fans. I don’t think it is necessary to be a connoisseur of Pride and Prejudice to enjoy this novel (as most people are bound to have seen, at least, an adaptation of the story, and there are references to the main plot points scattered throughout the book) but my guess is that many people who read it will go back and read Austen again. And will look forward to more of James’s books. I surely will.

(Ah, the book has a series of questions and answers at the end that makes it an eminently suitable read for book clubs).

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2018-01-28 17:44
Review of Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen
Pride and Prejudice - Jane Austen,Anna Quindlen

I can't believe it took my until age 39 to read my first Jane Austen.  I enjoyed the read even though it wasn't exactly in my wheelhouse for books I usually enjoy.  There is literally no plot outside of who is going to marry and fall in love with whom, but the story was a fascinating look into upper-middle class Victorian England.  I can see why Austen is so popular as a writer.

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2018-01-11 16:43
#Audiobook Review: Villains Pride by M. K. Gibson
Villains Pride: The Shadow Master, Book 2 - Amber Cove Publishing,William Gibson,Jeffrey Kafer

Jackson Blackwell is back again and looking for a new adventure while awaiting fatherhood. However, when his beloved tosses him out of his own dimension, finding a place to spend time isn’t easy. That is until King Stanley provides him a place in his comic book realm.


After completely enjoying the first book in this series, I came into Villains Pride with high hopes. Unfortunately, I felt the first half of the story was poorly written, stuffed with filler material. It wasn’t until the last third that the story itself came together with a solid plot and supporting action. 


What I did love: the play and fun on the various famous comic book heroes. No one is sacred, from Iron Man to Batman, from Superman to Wolverine. Mr. Gibson nails each persona in a witty and fresh way. I also really enjoyed the superhero war which takes place well after the midpoint of the book. This is when Jackson’s plans really start to take shape and mean something, and when the story took off and had focus.


My biggest issue with Villains Pride is the entire first half or more of the book. I felt there was little point or purpose. It was repetitive, and I felt like the author was using Jackson as a soapbox. In the first book the jibes were more subtle and less frequent, making them sharp and witty. This time it felt like a constant rant, lecturing the listener. It got old very quickly.


One of the highlights is once again the performance by Mr. Kafer. I loved the subtle yet distinctive changes in each male and female voice. He had the perfect fit for all characters. He really does bring to life the characters, making them people in my mind.


In the end, I struggled with Villains Pride. The first half to two-thirds of the story was meandering and repetitive. I felt like I was being lectured constantly. And frankly, Jackson is an asshole, which didn’t seem as funny this time around.


My Rating: C+

Narration: A- 


Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
text 2018-01-09 14:20
Books I have DNF'd recently....
Morning Star - Pierce Brown
Pride and Prometheus - John Kessel
How to Stop Time - Matt Haig

I put these books down recently.


Morning Star - This book had the characters eating a bucket of cockroaches and raw snakes and nonsense as some initiation.  No. Just No. My stomach never recovered. I just Wiki'd the ending and we're good. It's been real Pierce Brown.


Pride and Prometheus - I'm not going to discourage anyone from reading this - the Pride and Prejudice parts were good. The Frankenstein parts bored me. It could just be me.


How to Stop Time- Just a bad fit - it's smart sci-fi about a man who never ages and is part of some order who polices them and protects their secret. He is told never to fall in love. Of course, he does.  It will probably be a hit but I found it depressing and kept wishing it would get to the point. It rambled a lot.


I received Pride and Prometheus and How to Stop Time free in exchange for an honest review. 


More posts
Your Dashboard view:
Need help?