logo
Wrong email address or username
Wrong email address or username
Incorrect verification code
back to top
Search tags: Realistic-Fiction
Load new posts () and activity
Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2018-12-05 01:13
Heavy material in a light package
Sunny Side Up - Matthew Holm,Jennifer L. Holm

Sunny is looking forward to her awesome summer vacation going to the beach with her best friend...and then she gets sent off to stay with her grandfather at his retirement community in Florida. What Sunny views as a punishment is actually her family trying to shield her from her brother's trip to rehab. Sunny Side Up by Jennifer L. Holm and Matthew Holm looks at substance abuse from the viewpoint of a younger sibling which is rather refreshing and ultimately important when a child is trying to find books that relate to themselves. (I don't know anyone with a picture perfect childhood so it's a good idea if children's literature reflects that.) The references to substance abuse are rather oblique for the majority of the book so it's not heavy handed in the slightest. For the most part, we see Sunny acting pretty snotty as she comes to terms with the fact her summer is not going to be anything like she had planned but intermixed with that is a healthy dose of fear, anxiety, and shame. Remember she has no idea what has caused her family to send her away but she think she must have done something terribly wrong. (Also, her grandfather is the mack daddy of the retirement community and it's hilarious.) She does manage to make a friend of commensurate age though and the two of them develop a mutual interest in superheroes and comics. 

 

It's hard to say where the author lands in terms of keeping family secrets (they experienced something similar to Sunny in reality) but what the reader does see is Sunny learning about the difficulty of maintaining secret identities as she gets into reading comics. By the end, she is told what has happened with her brother and the reader (if they hadn't already figured it out) sees all the puzzle pieces fall into place. Because the reader is seeing everything through the eyes of Sunny the reading experience is quite different from some of the realistic fiction on this topic that I've read before. I think from that standpoint this is quite a unique and important book especially for children who have experienced this and are feeling quite alone and isolated. In fact, at the end they tacked on a bit about talking to someone if you know a family member is struggling with substance abuse. If you're creating a booklist for your students and you're looking for material that touches on substance abuse and/or family dynamics you could do a lot worse than picking Sunny Side Up. 8/10

 

The illustrations reminded me of Sunday newspaper comic strips. [Source: Scholastic]

 

What's Up Next: 5 Worlds Book 1: The Sand Warrior by Alexis & Mark Siegel and illustrations by Boya Sun & Matt Rockefeller

 

What I'm Currently Reading: Guns, Germs, and Steel by Jared Diamond

Source: readingfortheheckofit.blogspot.com
Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2018-11-30 16:22
A realistic portrayal of rape culture and so much more...
The Nowhere Girls - Amy Reed

๏ ๏ ๏  Book Blurb ๏ ๏ ๏ 

 

Three misfits come together to avenge the rape of a fellow classmate and in the process trigger a change in the misogynist culture at their high school transforming the lives of everyone around them in this searing and timely story.
Who are the Nowhere Girls?
They’re every girl. But they start with just three:
Grace Salter is the new girl in town, whose family was run out of their former community after her southern Baptist preacher mom turned into a radical liberal after falling off a horse and bumping her head.
Rosina Suarez is the queer punk girl in a conservative Mexican immigrant family, who dreams of a life playing music instead of babysitting her gaggle of cousins and waitressing at her uncle’s restaurant.
Erin Delillo is obsessed with two things: marine biology and Star Trek: The Next Generation, but they aren’t enough to distract her from her suspicion that she may, in fact, be an android.
When Grace learns that Lucy Moynihan, the former occupant of her new home, was run out of town for having accused the popular guys at the school of gang rape, she’s incensed that Lucy never had justice. For their own personal reasons, Rosina and Erin feel equally deeply about Lucy’s tragedy, so they form an anonymous group of girls at Prescott High to resist the sexist culture at their school, which includes boycotting sex of any kind with the male students.
Told in alternating perspectives, this groundbreaking novel is an indictment of rape culture and explores with bold honesty the deepest questions about teen girls and sexuality.

 

 

๏ ๏ ๏  My Review ๏ ๏ ๏ 

 

The Nowhere girls started off feeling very YA with emphasis on the Y.  It also had its instances that felt very preachy with its WWJD (what would Jesus do) moments...and I don't do religion all that well.  But it quickly became more than that, it takes the very serious subject matter of rape and gives you an uplifting tale of what you can do to make a difference...to make a stand...when you set your mind and heart on doing so.  It takes the feeling of hopelessness that Asking For It gave me and turned it into something hopeful.  With an exceptionally diverse cast of characters, that totally rocked, this book crept up on me and made me love it.

 

 

๏ ๏ ๏  MY RATING ๏ ๏ ๏ 

 

4.5STARS - GRADE=A-

 


๏ Breakdown of Ratings ๏
 
Plot⇝ 4.5/5
Main Characters⇝ 4/5
Secondary Characters⇝ 4/5
The Feels⇝ 5/5
Pacing⇝ 4.5/5
Addictiveness⇝ 4/5
Theme or Tone⇝ 5/5
Flow (Writing Style)⇝ 4.3/5
Backdrop (World Building)⇝ 5/5
Originality⇝ 5/5
Ending⇝ 5/5 Cliffhanger⇝ Nope.
๏ ๏ ๏
Book Cover⇝ It's okay...
Narration⇝ ☆4☆ for Rebekkah Ross, she wasn't too bad, she did have slightly different voices for each of the three main characters, but I still think it would have been better with three narrators.
Setting⇝ Prescott, Oregon
Source⇝ Audiobook (Library)
๏ ๏ ๏
Goodreads
Amazon
Booklikes

 

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2018-11-21 21:58
A Sweet and Sassy Country Music Story that's sure to please...
You'd Be Mine: A Novel - Erin Hahn

๏ ๏ ๏  Book Blurb ๏ ๏ ๏ 

 

 

Annie Mathers is America’s sweetheart and heir to a country music legacy full of all the things her Gran warned her about. Superstar Clay Coolidge is most definitely going to end up one of those things.

But unfortunately for Clay, if he can’t convince Annie to join his summer tour, his music label is going to drop him. That’s what happens when your bad boy image turns into bad boy reality. Annie has been avoiding the spotlight after her parents’ tragic death, except on her skyrocketing YouTube channel. Clay’s label wants to land Annie, and Clay has to make it happen.


Swayed by Clay’s undeniable charm and good looks, Annie and her band agree to join the tour. From the start fans want them to be more than just tour mates, and Annie and Clay can’t help but wonder if the fans are right. But if there’s one part of fame Annie wants nothing to do with, it’s a high-profile relationship. She had a front row seat to her parents’ volatile marriage and isn’t interested in repeating history. If only she could convince her heart that Clay, with his painful past and head over heels inducing tenor, isn’t worth the risk.

 

 

 

 

๏ ๏ ๏  My Review ๏ ๏ ๏ 

 

I really thought this was going to come off as overly heavy with the Young of Young Adult, but it surprised me, it deals with some heavy issues and does it surprisingly well.  With a feel that reminds me of Open Road Summer, this story did not disappoint and I think I liked this even more than that book.  The romance has all the feels, even for YA...and I loved every one of the characters so much.  I was also blown away by the songwriting, especially "you'd be mine" and how it embodies the whole story. I would love to hear it put to music.  Since I'm from Michigan, I loved that Annie and even the Author is too.  There was even a shout-out to Grand Rapids, which I live only a little north of.


๏ ๏ ๏  MY RATING ๏ ๏ ๏ 

 

4.8STARS - GRADE=A

 

 

 

 

 Breakdown of Ratings  

 

Plot⇝ 4.5/5

Main Characters⇝ 5/5

Secondary Characters⇝ 5/5

The Feels⇝ 5/5

Pacing⇝ 4.5/5

Addictiveness⇝ 4.5/5

Theme or Tone⇝ 5/5

Flow (Writing Style)⇝ 5/5

Backdrop (World Building)⇝ 5/5

Originality⇝ 5/5

Ending⇝ 5/5 Cliffhanger⇝ Nope.

๏ ๏ ๏

Book Cover⇝ It's okay...

Setting⇝ Michigan/Indiana and all over the United States

Source⇝ I received an ARC via Netgalley in exchange for an honest review 

๏ ๏ ๏

Goodreads

Amazon

Booklikes

 

 
Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2018-10-31 21:06
Es war wie verhext
Der Märchenerzähler - Antonia Michaelis,Kathrin Schüler

Recherchiere ich Autor_innen für meine Rezensionen, freue ich mich immer, wenn ich in ihren Biografien und Interviews etwas finde, das mich mit ihnen verbindet. Bei Antonia Michaelis ist der Kitt zwischen uns allerdings so unwahrscheinlich, dass ich mir ungläubig die Augen rieb. In einem Interview wurde sie gefragt, ob sie sich noch an das erste Buch erinnere, das sie je gelesen habe. Sie antwortete, das wäre mit 5 Jahren ein Buch über drei kitschige kleine Katzen gewesen, die mit einem Wollknäuel spielten. Ich kenne das Buch! Es war auch eins meiner Kinderbücher! Zugegeben, ich weiß nicht, ob wir dasselbe Buch meinen, aber mir gefällt die Vorstellung. Glücklicherweise ist „Drei Kätzchen“ kein Hinweis auf die Qualität von Michaelis‘ eigenen Büchern. Sie überzeugte mich mit „Die Worte der Weißen Königin“ – nun wollte ich sie mit „Der Märchenerzähler“ erneut auf die Probe stellen.

 

Auf dem Schulhof kursieren über den polnischen Kurzwarenhändler die wildesten Gerüchte. Er schwänzt die Schule. Er lebt in einem Plattenbau. Er verkauft Drogen. Für Anna war ihr schweigsamer Mitschüler kaum mehr als ein verschwommener Schemen am Rande ihrer Wahrnehmung. Bis zu dem Tag, an dem sie die Puppe findet. Plötzlich erhält der polnische Kurzwarenhändler einen Namen. Er heißt Abel Tannatek und verfügt über eine magische Stimme. Er ist ein Märchenerzähler, der sich rührend um seine kleine Schwester Micha kümmert, für die er wundervolle Geschichten erfindet. Schon bald ist Anna von ihm verzaubert und entdeckt Gefühle, die sie niemals für möglich gehalten hätte. Doch sie spürt auch, dass irgendetwas nicht stimmt. Das Märchen nimmt eine beängstigende Wendung. Welche finsteren Geheimnisse verbirgt Abel? Tiefer und tiefer versinkt Anna in einem undurchsichtigen Strudel von Fantasie und Realität und erkennt, dass das Märchen vielleicht kein Happy End haben kann…

 

Wie soll ich euch nur erklären, was ich für „Der Märchenerzähler“ empfinde? Als ich diese Rezension begann, dachte ich, sie würde ein Klacks. Einleitung und Inhaltsangabe schrieben sich flüssig und ich war optimistisch, auch den Hauptteil zügig fertig zu bekommen. Jetzt sitze ich vor der gefühlt hundertsten Version und möchte am liebsten laut schreien. Es ist wie verhext. Meine Gedanken stecken fest. Ich komme nicht voran. Dieses Buch macht mich fertig. Meine Emotionen sind so widersprüchlich, dass ich nicht weiß, wie ich sie in einen kohärenten Text verwandeln soll. Ich schreibe jetzt einfach drauf los und schaue, was dabei herauskommt. Also verzeiht, wenn diese Rezension etwas anders ist als meine üblichen Ergüsse.
Einerseits sehe ich in Antonia Michaelis eine der sozialkritischsten Autor_innen, die Deutschland zu bieten hat. Ich schätze ihren Mut, auf das Leid hinter verschlossenen Türen zu blicken. Ihr Talent, ernste, traurige und unangenehme Tabuthemen in poetische Geschichten mit einer traumähnlichen Atmosphäre zu kleiden, ist beeindruckend und ihr Schreibstil ist irrsinnig schön. Ich erkenne, wie besonders „Der Märchenerzähler“ ist und würde lügen, würde ich behaupten, die melancholische, tragische Geschichte von Abel und Anna habe mich nicht berührt. Die begleitende Binnenerzählung des Märchens, das Abel für seine kleine Schwester Micha erfindet, ist bezaubernd und erzeugt auf einzigartige Art und Weise Spannung, weil sie Realität und Fantasie verschwimmen lässt. Ich wollte herausfinden, welche Ereignisse der Wirklichkeit Abel darin spiegelt und bangte um ihn und die entzückende Micha, die er mit bedingungsloser Aufopferung liebt. Ich fieberte mit, das möchte ich nicht leugnen.
Andererseits empfand ich jedoch nicht so intensiv, wie ich es mir gewünscht hätte. Meine Tränenkanäle blieben fest verschlossen, obwohl „Der Märchenerzähler“ prädestiniert dafür ist, wahre Sturzbäche auszulösen. Ich konnte das Buch nicht richtig spüren. Ich kam nicht an meine Emotionen heran, weil die surreale, ätherische Atmosphäre sie bedeckte und dämpfte. Ich fühlte mich in Watte gepackt. Für mich ist es zu rücksichtsvoll, zu sanftmütig. Oftmals erreicht mich die harte Realität besser als jede lyrische Metapher. Ich verstehe, dass kalte Fakten nicht in diese Geschichte passen, weil das Märchen für Abel, Micha und Anna eine Realitätsflucht darstellt, durch die sie die schreckliche, mitleidlose Welt vergessen können. Aber für mich gestaltete sich meine Leseerfahrung dadurch als zu entrückt. Deshalb erlebte ich während der gesamten Lektüre eine unüberwindbare Distanz, die ich gern abgeschüttelt hätte.
Und dann war da noch die Vergewaltigung. Ich möchte nicht zu viel verraten, doch ich finde es wichtig, diesen Punkt anzusprechen. Ich begreife nicht, was sich Antonia Michaelis dabei dachte, wieso sie glaubte, diese Szene sei notwendig. Meiner Ansicht nach war sie es nicht, weil sie deren Effekt auch anders hätte erreichen können. Der Autor Robert Jackson Bennett schrieb einmal in einem Essay, dass Vergewaltigungsszenen nur dann eingesetzt werden sollten, wenn sie absolut unvermeidlich sind. Das ist sehr, sehr selten der Fall. Eine Vergewaltigung als inhaltliches Stilmittel zu missbrauchen, ist inakzeptabel. In „Der Märchenerzähler“ konnte ich nicht erkennen, inwiefern diese Szene die Geschichte entscheidend beeinflusste. Ich mutmaße, dass Michaelis eine Aussage über die Beziehung der beteiligten Figuren treffen wollte, was meiner Meinung nach keine überzeugende Rechtfertigung ist. Zusätzlich schürt der nachfolgende Umgang des Opfers mit diesem Erlebnis Vergewaltigungsmythen. Mir stieß diese Szene daher sehr sauer auf. Sie beschäftigte mich so, dass ich das Buch kaum noch von ihr trennen und für sich selbst betrachten kann. Mag sein, dass ich überempfindlich bin. Vermutlich wollte Antonia Michaelis vermitteln, dass Liebe eigenen Regeln folgt. Eine Vergewaltigung sollte jedoch niemals im Rahmen dieser Regeln liegen.

 

Meine Güte, bin ich erleichtert. Endlich habe ich diese blöde Rezension fertig und einen halbwegs brauchbaren Text zustande gebracht. Ich erlebe immer mal wieder Buchbesprechungen, die sich schwerfällig schreiben, besonders dann, wenn meine Notizen nutzloser Murks sind. Doch ich glaube, eine Situation, in der meine Gedanken zu einem Buch so fest ineinander verdreht sind, dass ich ernsthafte Schwierigkeiten habe, sie zu entwirren und auszuformulieren, habe ich noch nie erlebt. Der Knoten ist auch immer noch nicht geplatzt. „Der Märchenerzähler“ wird für mich wohl auf ewig mit widersprüchlichen Gefühlen und einem generellen Eindruck von mentalem Chaos verbunden sein. Ich hätte niemals angenommen, dass dieses unschuldig daherkommende Buch solche Komplikationen auslösen könnte. Ich hoffe, dass diese Rezension trotzdem hilfreich für euch war, denn eine faire Empfehlung erscheint mir unmöglich. Wie „Der Märchenerzähler“ auf mich wirkte, ist eine Ausnahmeerscheinung, die weder Rückschluss darauf gibt, wie ich eine Lektüre normalerweise erfahre, noch, wie sie euch beeinflussen würde. Es ist ein Sonderfall. Deshalb kann und möchte ich euch nur eines raten: falls ihr sensibel auf das Thema Vergewaltigung reagiert, solltet ihr Abstand von „Der Märchenerzähler“ nehmen. Das ist der einzige Kritikpunkt, den ich faktisch (statt emotional) begründen kann. Diese Szene war unnötig und enttäuschte mich sehr. Von einer Autorin, die mutig gesellschaftliche Missstände anprangert, habe ich definitiv mehr erwartet.

Source: wortmagieblog.wordpress.com/2018/10/31/antonia-michaelis-der-maerchenerzaehler
Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2018-09-20 05:22
The Lemonade Crime (audiobook) by Jacqueline Davies, narrated by Stina Nielson
The Lemonade Crime: Lemonade Series, Book 2 (MP3 Book) - Jacqueline Davies,Suzy Jackson

Evan and his little sister Jessie are both in the fourth grade, not because they're twins, but rather because Jessie skipped a grade. Jessie is particularly good at math, very focused, feels strongly that things should be fair, and believes that rules are meant to be followed.

When one of their classmates, Scott, announces that he now owns a fancy new Xbox 2020, Evan sees red. He knows exactly where Scott got the money for it - Scott stole that money, over two hundred dollars, from Evan's shorts when they were swimming at a friend's house. Evan doesn't have any proof that Scott did it, but it's the only explanation. Then Jessie comes up with a plan: she's going to bring the truth to light in a court of law created by her and her classmates.

I checked this out from my library's Overdrive without realizing that the library owned the first book in audio as well, or I'd have started with the first book instead. It looks like I'll be listening to this series out of order.

And I do plan on listening to the first book. I enjoyed this second book in the series more than I expected to, considering that Middle Grade fiction usually reads too young for me (yes, I know that's the point - I'm not the intended audience for these books and I realize that). Jessie and Evan were great characters, both flawed in their own ways but still good kids.

Jessie didn't quite feel like she fit in. I sympathized with her trouble figuring out where to hang out during recess (or was it lunch? I can't remember). The way she really got into her courtroom plan reminded me a bit of myself. I could imagine her tossing and turning in bed, unable to stop thinking about all the things she still needed to do before the trial. She'd taken on the responsibility of both setting up as realistic a trial as possible and acting as Evan's lawyer.

Evan was really into basketball and had a bit of a crush on one of his classmates, Megan, who was also his sister's friend. I hated the way Evan acted in one particular scene, but the good thing was that he hated how he'd acted too, once it was all over, and took the time to try to do something about it.

This ended in a way that was more peaceful and friendly than I expected, and I liked the layers it added to the characters.

The peeks at Scott's home life hinted at his motives, even if Evan couldn't see them, and I'm looking forward to finding out character information I missed by skipping the first book.

(spoiler show)


One nice detail: each chapter began with a definition of a term or phrase relating to courtroom proceedings (for example, "perjury"). Usually it was something illustrated by a character's words or actions in that particular chapter.

 

(Original review posted on A Library Girl's Familiar Diversions.)

More posts
Your Dashboard view:
Need help?