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review 2017-04-15 04:42
CELEBRATE EASTER WITH THE RABBIT MAN, AND DUNCAN RALSTON!

cover, where the monsters live, duncan ralston

How far would you go for revenge?

Synopsis:

When a six-year-old girl is abused and left for dead by a pedophile known only as the “Rabbit Man” due to the claw marks left on her body, police follow every lead but reach only dead ends.

Hungry for justice, her grieving father abandons wife and child on a harrowing journey deep undercover into Miami’s sex offender colony under the Julia Tuttle Causeway. His purpose is simple: to find the “Rabbit Man” among them, and put him in the ground.

Months later, with no one to trust and the pedophiles he lives among growing suspicious of his actions, he learns nothing is simple where the monsters live.

 

Hoppy Easter! Come see what I put in your basket...

WHERE THE MONSTERS LIVE is NOT an extreme horror story, but I still want you to have a little ‘heads up’ before you start reading.

The story is not super graphic in an icky way, but it's emotionally graphic. WTML will sucker punch you right in the feels. It's a disturbing story, and the 'uncomfort' level rises drastically if you have a child of your own.
I didn’t notice just HOW 'emotionally graphic' it was until The Dark Defender woke up to ask me what was wrong, and I had tears streaming down my cheeks.

 

At one point I thought I knew exactly how this story was going to end (we’ll talk about that once you finish reading). That wouldn’t have made it a suck story – but I am happy that WTML didn’t go for the ‘ironic twist’, and I’m very satisfied with how it’s wrapped up – there could be a little wiggle room JIC case the story isn’t done with us yet.

 

Full review posted HERE - come join in on the discussion of WTML!

Source: beckisbookblog.wordpress.com/2017/04/14/celebrate-easter-with-the-rabbit-man-and-duncan-ralston
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review 2017-04-03 10:14
A dark revenge story recommended to readers looking for an author with a distinctive voice and style
A Shiny Coin For Carol Prentice - Mark Barry

I write this review as a member of Rosie’s Book Review Team and I was provided with an ARC copy of the novel I freely chose to review.

Although I had heard about the author and read quite a few reviews of his previous books, this is the first of his novels I have read so I can’t compare it to his previous work. I know from his comments in the book that it links to another one of his novels, Carla (I won’t mention how, first, because I haven’t read the other novel, so I can’t comment on how well or badly that works, and second, because I’m going to try very hard not to reveal any spoilers) but I can put at rest the minds of all readers who are in the same circumstances as me. This book can be read as a stand-alone, although I suspect you’ll feel as curious as I am about Carla once you finish reading this novel. 

This novel is narrated in the first person by the eponymous Carol Prentice of the title. And yes, we get to know what the shiny coin means, but again, I’m not going to tell you. She’s a young woman; she’s just finished her degree at Manchester University and has to go back to her hometown because her father has passed away. She had avoided the town for several years (for good reasons as you’ll learn when you read the book) but she comes back to renovate the house and because the time has finally arrived to put her plan into practice. Of course, we don’t get to know about the plan until much later in the novel, but we have some hints throughout. She gets a job at a bookshop (so there are some interesting discussions about literature, mostly initiated by her boss, Steve, who is a connoisseur, not only of books but also of ales and many other things) and it’s not long before ghosts from her past come knocking. What at first appears to be a snotty and spoilt young man’s tantrum turns into a black hole sucking in everything and everybody. Almost.

The novel has some meta-fictional aspects. I’ve already mentioned the conversations about literature, psychology concepts (like the halo effect, perceptual closure), Steve was an author years ago back but did not make it and has strong opinions about popular literature and bestsellers (if you love James Patterson or Fifty Shades, look away now), and the author of this novel, Mark Barry, also makes a cameo appearance in it. As I said before, I haven’t read any of his other works but from some of the reviews, I get the sense that he has appeared in some others. He does not have a big part, and it reminded me of Hitchcock’s appearances in his movies (although Barry’s is a bit more significant than that).

As the novel is narrated in the first-person, we get a close look into the functioning of Carol’s mind and we get to know her better than other characters. She seems to focus a lot of her attention on how people smell (and it’s not always pleasant), what clothes they wear, and how they look. She has some annoying speech habits. There are plenty of ‘like’, ‘I so’, ‘totally’… Those appear not only when she’s talking to others but also when she’s thinking, despite the fact that she’s fairly articulate and perceptive in other ways. It might be funny for some readers and perhaps somewhat annoying for others, but it keeps her real and the story will hook everybody in and will make you keep reading no matter what. Carol says quite a few times that she cannot feel, that she observes things but does not feel them, and when we’ve gone over half the novel she eventually tells Steve why. I had my suspicions but the truth is worse. From her description of the events (that of course, I won’t reveal either) it becomes clear that she was experiencing them she tried to focus on anything but what was happening. She concentrated and observed objects, smells, décor, and it seems her current focus on describing things is a defence mechanism to keep events and people at bay, a way of remaining in control of what is happening as she felt powerless at the time. After her confession to Steve, the floodgates open and she starts feeling again, including acknowledging her complex feelings for Steve, that is difficult to know if they are projected from her need to have support as he becomes some sort of a father figure, or are genuine. She herself is not so sure.

Steve is the other character we get to know in detail, although of course always from Carol’s point of view and this is biased. She likes him from the beginning and he seems a genuinely nice man, much older than her, who’s tried many things and seems to have settled into a quiet life. He is not one for talking much about his feelings (he talks about everything else, though) and he is a recognisable and multi-dimensional character, with a strong sense of moral, that gets caught in a situation not of his making, but doesn’t seem willing or able to extricate himself from it.

Other than Carol and Steve, there aren’t many characters we get to know through the novel. There’s Toby, the baddy, a handsome and rich young man and a bully who believes rules and laws don’t apply to him; there’s also his father, and some other characters that only appear briefly (like the chief of police) but they aren’t as well developed. They only play a minor part in the drama and don’t hold that much of the narrator’s attention. By contrast, the town becomes quite a recognisable character in its own right, with its social mores, its politics and its royalty (so to speak).

The novel is written in a very colloquial way as pertains to the character narrating it (I’ve already mentioned the characteristics of Carol’s language) and there are plenty of references and words very local that might be a bit obscure to readers from outside the UK (or even the region) but that is part of what makes it so distinctive and vivid.

The novel offers quite a few surprises and reveals them slowly. I think most readers will have a variety of hypothesis about what’s going to happen, what the baddies will do next and what the plan is. I’m not sure many people will guess right and is an interesting and effective twist. This is a novel of revenge and just deserts that highlights the fact that there is always a price to pay. We might feel we need to exact revenge to be at peace but things are never quite as easy. With regards to what sets off what Carol describes as ‘the war’ it is pretty banal but, as she acknowledges, it’s not really about that and unfortunately other people get in the middle and end up becoming ‘collateral damage’. It did make me think of Hannah Arendt and her concept of ‘the banality of evil’. In this case not only about the evil person but about what sets it all off.  It does not take much for some people to ruin a person’s life, just because they can…  I’ve already mentioned the ending but I wanted to add that the ending is also a beginning.

I know I’ve been a bit cryptic about this novel but I had to be. I recommend it to those who like stories with psychologically complex characters, where the how is as important as the what, and to readers who’re looking for an author with a distinctive voice and style.  (There is some violence, some talk about sex and disturbing content but none of it is extremely explicit or gore. It is more what we feel at the time of reading it than what is on the page.)

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review 2017-03-03 18:57
The Pirate's Duchess (The Regent's Revenge) (Volume 1) - Katherine Bone

For a star rating and full review please visit InD'tale magazine online, March 2017 issue. http://www.indtale.com/reviews/histor...

Source: www.indtale.com
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review 2017-02-23 01:39
Quick read
Marriage Of Revenge (The Trueno Brides) (Silhouette Desire #1751) - Sheri Whitefeather

Marriage Of Revenge by Sheri Whitefeather is a fairly short read, a great choice for those with limited time for reading.  Ms Whitefeather has given us a well-written book.  The characters are awesome.  There's plenty of drama, humor and spice to hold the reader's attention.  I enjoyed Marriage Of Revenge and look forward to reading more from this author.  Marriage Of Revenge is book 2 of the Trueno Brides Series but can be read as a standalone.  This is a complete book, not a cliff-hanger.

 

I read a print copy of this book.

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review 2017-02-09 14:45
#Audiobook Review: Hell's Revenge by Eve Langlais
Hell's Revenge (Princess of Hell) - Eve Langlais,Rebecca Estrella

Hell’s Revenge opens with an overlapping scene from the epilogue of the previous book, Snowballs in Hell in which Muriel discovers her mom is none other than Mother Nature, Gaia. Although she hasn’t visited Muriel since leaving her with her father as a small child, Gaia has returned to inform Muriel that she is pregnant, and both of her lovers at the fathers. Gaia intends to take the child from Muriel. There is so much for Muriel, her lovers, and her father to process, which takes them to Hell to get answers. Unfortunately, there is still the “big bad” after Muriel, and her life, along with her quickly growing unborn child, is in peril. 

 

Hell’s Revenge continues the overall story arc about a mysterious, powerful force who is after Lucifer’s kingdom, brining the issue to a head. While the entire story felt short, it was entertaining, and I liked how it wrapped up the storyline. However, in retrospect, the dangers and motives behind the entire three-book plot line weren’t as sinister as they came off in the first book. Some of the events from previous two books don’t every tie into the conclusion of the plot line. Regardless, the story was enjoyable. There weren’t nearly as many graphic sex scenes, and the book focused on the overall plot. 

 

One important event from Hell’s Revenge is that Muriel and her family learn more about her powers. Her magic is almost its own entity, and if it is depleted, it will seek out new sources of sex for facets of Muriel’s magic not being fed. For example, it sought out and connected with a vampire to feed the cold and dark part of her magic. Once the magic connects, it is permanent. What does this mean in the long run? More men in Muriel’s bedroom.

 

Once again, Rebecca Estrella provides the narration for the story. One thing that changed in Hell’s Revenge, is that there are parts of the story shared from both David and Auric’s point-of-views. Ms. Estrella uses the same general narrator voice for each character, while continuing to provide a unique voice when each speaks. Overall, her performance is good - with unique and fitting voices for all of the characters. She’s also improved her emotional content, making the story more gripping as she shares it. However it was a bit confusing to switch POVs yet continue to have the same narrator voice.

 

In the end, I enjoyed Hell’s Revenge, and it’s my favorite of the series to date. I liked the deepening explanations of Muriel’s magic and the need for sex. I also liked understanding how much both David and Auric mean to her. With the alternate POVs, we also learn how much that bond truly is three ways, back and forth. Hell’s Revenge has an end-of-the-series type feel, but the fourth book is already out, so I look forward to finding out what happens next for Muriel, Lucinda, and the gang.

 

Story: B

Narration: B

 

Review copy provided by Tantor Audio

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