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text 2018-10-16 15:02
Reading progress update: I've listened 1519 out of 2103 minutes.
Titan: The Life of John D. Rockefeller, Sr. - Ron Chernow,Grover Gardner

Until I was brought to a dead halt by a corrupt file and now am waiting for Audible to make the repair.

 

It has been a long time since this has happened but Audible has fabulous customer service. The CSA spent almost an hour with me as I downloaded a new copy of the file (almost 500MB worth) and then synced it to my iPod and then listened for over 5 minutes while story advanced on it own to the breakdown point. So the title has been removed from my library and the credit I spent has been restored and they will contact me when the file has been repaired so I can finally finish the darned thing.

 

 

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text 2018-10-16 08:15
REVIEW BY MERISSA - Hall Pass For Life by Dorothea Lynne
Hall Pass for Life - Dorothea Lynne

Hall Pass for Life is the first book by Dorothea Lynne I have read. This is a contemporary romance with dark theme - a young woman trapped in a loveless marriage to an older man. Although he is happy to have multiple affairs during their marriage, he is insistent upon controlling every aspect of her. This doesn't stop him from arranging for a week's getaway for her with a younger man so he can have his mistress in their home.

Thea has turned forty and has no idea where her life is going. Her husband, Malcolm, won't allow her to work, constantly criticises her, and yet isn't prepared to divorce her just yet - even though is far too old for his tastes. Liam is a singer and is 25 years old. He isn't sure what to make of the arrangement, but for the amount of money being given to a charity, he will be friendly for the week.

Both Thea and Liam get more than they bargain for, and will fight for their lives together, no matter what Malcolm throws at them.

I loved the premise of this story, although I don't particularly like first person, present tense, which is how this book is written. I found it to be quite confusing over who was speaking in places, and had to read further down to see who responded to figure it out. Personally speaking, I also found the constant nicknames and terms of endearments to be quite monotonous. Yes, it is cute occasionally, but to use them in 85% of the sentences... The only reason I can think of for the constant use was to help the reader know who was talking, which didn't work when they weren't used.

The story itself moved along at a fair pace, albeit a bit jerky in places. Some of the words and actions of various characters didn't seem quite 'real', as though the timing was off slightly. I think this is a standalone book, although the ending has possibly been left open for a follow up.

Anyway, for me, this book didn't quite hit the mark, although it was still a good story. I am absolutely positive that others will love this book, and devour every word. It just didn't work on all levels for me.

* A copy of this book was provided to me with no requirements for a review. I voluntarily read this book, and the comments here are my honest opinion. *

Merissa
Archaeolibrarian - I Dig Good Books!

Source: archaeolibrarian.wixsite.com/website/single-post/2018/08/10/Hall-Pass-For-Life-by-Dorothea-Lynne
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review 2018-10-16 06:55
A Day in the Life of a Raindrop by Stephen Daingerfield Dunn
A Day In The Life Of A Raindrop - Stephen Daingerfield Dunn,Moore Dejah

TITLE:  A Day in the Life of a Raindrop

 

AUTHOR:  Stephen Daingerfield Dunn

 

PUBLICATION DATE:  1 November 2018

 

FORMAT:  ARC ebook

 

ISBN-13: 9780998542881

____________________________

NOTE: I received a copy of this book from NetGalley. This review is my honest opinion of the book.

____________________________

 

DESCRIPTION:

"Tells about the life of a raindrop as it falls to earth and makes it's way through the lives of people, pets, and gardens in a cheerful and heartfelt way.

For children and families, illustrated.

Our daring, darling protagonist, Droplet, invites us to join him for his adventures, enchantment, wonder and delight as he plunges from heaven to earth on the exciting journey of his life. He questions what will you do with the many days you are graced with, when he has only this one perfectly delicious and gloriously charming opportunity...one wonderful day."

______________________________________

 

REVIEW:

 

This is an adorable little poem about a rain drop's trip to Earth.  The colour illustrations are whimsical and beautiful.  The story entertaining and cheerful.  This would make a lovely addition for any child's library.

 

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review 2018-10-15 21:16
The Girl on the Balcony (Hussey)
The Girl on the Balcony: Olivia Hussey Finds Life After Romeo and Juliet - Olivia Hussey

I'm sorry to say that I came to this because, in connection with #metoo discussions, someone mentioned a nasty sexual assault on Olivia Hussey, taking place in the same house as the Manson murders only months afterwards. I'm also sorry to say that incident is indeed in this autobiography.

 

However, I have some very tender memories of the Hussey/Whiting/Zeffirelli Romeo and Juliet, a film I saw (like so many of my generation) in my teens while studying the play, so I was very happy to read Olivia Hussey's stories about the making of that film, when she was herself a mere teenager. It seems she got along with Zeffirelli very well indeed, and had a little fling with her gorgeous co-star to boot.

 

For the remainder of her career, Hussey was (at least for me), one of those "I know that face" actresses; she had parts in any number of films and TV miniseries I am sure I have seen, but of which I have no very vivid recollection. It appears she struggled with anxiety and agoraphobia (she mentions it more in her stories about her youth, but she doesn't say she ever completely overcame it); that in itself is adequate explanation for why she never made that last breakthrough to the top echelon of movie stars. She appears, however, to have more or less made a go of it, right up until she was completely impoverished by a crooked manager (this is not libel - he was prosecuted).

 

She appears to have been attracted by highly extroverted and performative men: her 3 husbands were Dean Paul Martin (son of Dean Martin), a Japanese singer, and an American rock singer. The first two marriages fell apart within a few years, but the third has lasted several decades. She had a child from each marriage, and Alex, the son of the first marriage, is credited as co-author on this book. There's also quite a lot about the budding acting career of her daughter, India, from the third marriage, but very little about the middle son.

 

Hussey goes into considerable detail about her discipleship, formed early, of an Indian guru she called "Baba"; I seriously doubt that he was quite so unequivocally virtuous and wise as she portrays him, and I completely doubt all the little anecdotes she delights in of his predicting all the twists and turns of her life before they occurred. However, she does seem to have been a bit of a religious seeker, and he apparently gave her a fair bit of balance and calm, so it isn't kind to be too censorious. Her reliance on "Baba", however, seems symptomatic of another pattern throughout the book - Olivia doesn't seem to have done well, or even desired to do well, without a man to lean on. The organizing principle of the book, such as it is, is not her progression from professional role to professional role (indeed, she leaves some things out altogether, especially towards the end of her career - you would never know she's a voice-over artist, for instance) but from marriage to marriage. And of course it's her prerogative, but one often gets the sense that even her account of that progression leaves out a lot of (probably painful) detail. In her description of her relationship with Dean Paul Martin, for instance, she tells how they separated after only a few years, and divorced a few years later, but she makes it seem as though he might still have been interested in coming back to her when they were both a bit more mature. The name of Dorothy Hamill (the skater, and Dean Paul Martin's wife for a few years in the early 80s) is never mentioned, and neither is that marriage.

 

Hussey satisfies with some grace what she must know would be a major attraction of her account, namely stories about interactions with actors more famous than herself, such as Laurence Olivier, David Niven, Dean Martin (of course) and Bette Davis (apparently an absolute harridan in her late-life appearance in Death on the Nile). Hussey is not a mean-spirited chronicler; she seems quite self-aware about her own failings, and she does not complain over-much about the truly nasty financial ill luck that attended both her early childhood and her later years, though we can read into her stories about moving from place to place the strain that must have placed on her.

 

There is a section of about 3 dozen photographs, some colour, many of them family, but some from her roles; this section was very well hidden (no chapter heading) in the e-version of the book, and so came as a pleasant surprise at the end of the text. From it, we easily gather that the people around her have been the most important thing in Hussey's life, and also that she has remained into later years remarkably good-looking.

 

Recommended if you like anecdotal film memoirs of the 60s/70s.

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review 2018-10-15 19:34
1,000 B00ks to Read Before you Die: A Life Changing List - James Mustich

I swear we like reading books about lists so we can quibble over the lists. Mustich is the man behind the Common Reader book catalog, which went out of business in 2006. 

This actually is a pretty good list of books to read before you die. Unlike other books of similar titles, with a few exceptions, Mustich confines it to one book per author. There are 71 exceptions to this, including Shakespeare and Dickens. 58 of the 71 are male, 13 female. The list breaks down to roughly 663 men and 204 women, with only 3 Native American authors. The books run though various genres, and while some choices are no suprise, there are quite a few surprises.

There is attention paid to fantasy and sci-fi (though the writers chosen in those genres are primary male) as well as sports writing. Children's books are present as are graphic novels (most of those chosen are by women, so that's nice)

The best part are the notes section under each volume - listing other works, further reading, and the odd factoid. The Try feature actually makes this a list of over 1,000. There is a checklist at the end.  Additionally, there is a themantic index in addition to the general one.

Of course, there are some things that don't quite make sense. Why no mention of Angela Carter? Why no mention of the editorial work of Datlow and Windling whose fairy tale series paved the way for the rich retellings we have today? Why no Terry Pratchett has an offical entry, but only a try?

Still a lovely well crafted volume.

But who would be on your list?

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