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Search tags: Sylvia-Day
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review 2017-10-22 19:37
On Fire
On Fire (Shadow Stalkers #4) - Sylvia Day
Darcy is a fire inspector in a small town investigating a series of arson incidents. Each is a place that Darcy is tied to in some way. After the third, she calls in for help. Jared, a Deputy Marshal arrives and is hot on the case. Insta-lust also flares up. 
This was decent. Very heavy on the sex, but it also had a plot. I liked Darcy's vocation, different for a change. She also saved herself towards the end, so mad props to that. Jared was also likable, and I liked that he had moments where he was distracted. 
I would have liked more on the mystery and Danielle. The suspense element could have been better. Everything was wrapped up, but *more* would have been wonderful. The "why" was lacking IMO. But, this did have halfway decent plot to all the sex that was happening on the page.
 
Slow start to this morning, this was the only book I finished for the readathon.  

 

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review 2017-10-18 02:02
Taking the Heat
Taking the Heat (Shadow Stalkers #2) - Sylvia Day
Brian is a US Marshall tasked with protecting a witness while transporting her across the country to testify. Layla is that witness. It turns out they have a history together. First loves, they broke-up (but of course haven't forgotten each other). Complicating matters, Layla is the target of an assassination attempt. 
Didn't care to much for this one. I had a harder time getting into the story. Don't get me wrong, the sexytimes were HOT, but it was just weird under the circumstances (someone has tried to kill you while on the way to testify in court, but who cares! Let's have sex!). Because I wasn't that into the story, moments like this one took me out more (not to mention gave me a case of the giggles): "She's found his prostate." and "...as her pussy spasmed in greedy delight." And let's not forgot this one: "...her womb spasming with need."
I did like the end and how they compromised to solve their issues.
 
 

 

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text 2017-10-09 02:28
Reading progress update: I've read 79 out of 304 pages.
Training the Best Dog Ever: A 5-Week Program Using the Power of Positive Reinforcement - Larry Kay,Dawn Sylvia-Stasiewicz

Finding this one more appealing than the other dog training book available during yesterday's library run.  I really liked the goal setting checklist.  

 

Our initial goals for Quincy are:

  • My dog is impeccably house-trained - We're particularly working on figuring out what his signal is to ask to go out.
  • Although my dog likes be with me, he isn't so needy that he shadows me everywhere - We perhaps should have listened better when they said he was originally part of a trio (2 dogs and a cat).  He's definitely shadowing us everywhere and has been pretty frantic when nobody is within sight.
  • The crate is my dog's home - we're working on having him enjoy the crate and to be less anxious when left alone inside it
  • My dog obeys the furniture rules and chews only what is allowed - we've gone from a cat that eats plastic bags to a dog who seems to gravitate to hard plastic items like army men.

 

While there are lots of other things to work on eventually, based on our 1st week, these are our priorities.

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review 2017-09-18 17:10
Women Murderers Of The 18th Century #Halloweenbingo2017
Women Murderers of the 18th Century - Sylvia Perrini

For a short novella I felt I learned about the subject of women serial killers that I didn't know about before.

I know it sounds silly but I don't remember ever reading about female killers before until these past 10 years.

Each set of women killed in their own way and of course was found out. Even back then they couldn't hide what they did no matter how much they tried.

We get a bit of detail on how each women took the lives of those around them, though we are not bored with full details. It is more sweet and to the point. 

If you are looking for just true crime light reading then this maybe the book for you. 

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review 2017-08-28 21:28
Indiana
Indiana - Sylvia Raphael,Naomi Schor,George Sand

‘You’ve been unbelievably imprudent!’ said Raymon, carefully closing the door behind him. ‘And my servants know you’re here! They’ve just told me.’

‘I made no secret of my presence,’ she replied coldly, ‘and, as for the word you use, I think it ill-chosen.’

‘I said imprudent; I ought to have said insane.’

‘I would have said courageous. But it doesn’t matter.'

No, no, it does matter, and I would like to get back to using the word insane. This novel was insane. Seriously, there was nothing sane amidst the high drama in this story. There was no sane person among the characters in this story. All of whom deserved to be slapped repeatedly by the way.

 

At some point when reading this I asked whether Sand wrote this as satire, but apparently she did not. This was, apparently, an earnest attempt at a story and at characters. 

 

I am really torn about this book, because I can't decide whether I liked it: plot, characters, and style, were all over the place. There were inconceivable and weird turns, there were high dramatics, there were tantrums, there was a lot of sentimentality. 

 

And, yet, at no point did I want to set the book aside. At no point did I want to DNF this.

 

I guess this is because the plot was so incredibly packed with moments that astonished me, that I just had to watch this train wreck of a novel until the end.

 

And what an end this was!

 

 

So, we get two of the characters on the way to fulfil a suicide pact.

They jump.

And yet they survive?

How did they miss the cliff?

Was this simply meant to be metaphorical?

WTF?

 

(spoiler show)

 

I guess I should have written about how Indiana is Sand making a stand for women's rights, and the emancipation of women as individuals who are equal under law, and the general struggle of individuals of both sexes against the social constrictions of her time, but, oh boy, that would mean that I would have to take Indiana serious as a novel.

And that I just cannot do.

 

For all the courage, sass, and modernism that Sand stands for, I have to separate the author from this particular book. This particular book was insane!

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