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review 2017-06-26 16:31
Review – The Future Is Now – Fracture Point by Jeff Altabef @JeffAltabef @novelpublicity
Fracture Point (A Point Thriller Book 1) - Jeff Altabef,Lane Diamond

Fracture Point by Jeff Altabef is not my first foray into his worlds and I can say for a fact that it will not be my last.

 

Fracture Point made me feel as if our future was held be

tween the pages…and it is frightening.

 

The release date is set for June 26, 2017.

 

Cover by D Robert Pease

 

Fracture Point

Amazon  /  Goodreads

 

MY REVIEW

 

 Let me start by saying, make sure you have no plans…nowhere to go, nothing to do…because once you start reading, Fracture Point will take you down a path that will not let you go until the last word is read.

 

Is this what the future holds for us?

 

Warren Scott, well, he got my attention from the opening chapter and I felt nothing good was going to come from knowing him. He has a secret and he won’t share…yet. There is nothing he won’t do to win and revels in the evil he doles out to anyone who crosses him…or sometimes just because it feels good. Psychopath is too nice a word for him.

 

Jack is working a banquet for the richy rich and was hooking up with one of their wives. He was after info, but got more than he bargained for when he found a flash drive.

 

Once their paths cross, others become involved in the race to save Jack’s life and their own, running at a frenetic pace, making me worry and fret, wondering who will survive.

 

Fracture Point is a frightening glimpse into America’s future…voters rights taken away, the poor are discounted as lesser human beings, and terrorism is used to create fear and manipulate the people. Does any of this ring a bell?

 

They are at a Fracture Point, the point where a spark can set their world ablaze.

 

Fracture Point hits all the buttons for a heart pumping, blood boiling, terrorizing suspense thriller that smacks of realism, with big business and the 1% taking everything and leaving nothing for the 99% struggling to survive.

 

Is this what OUR world is coming to? Will it take a Civil War to wake up the leaders? What happens when the American Dream is dead, there is no hope left and we feel backed into a corner with nothing to lose?

 

CAUTION – Kindle is at risk of being thrown.

 

I voluntarily reviewed an ARC of Fracture Point by Jeff Altabef.

 

Animated Animals. Pictures, Images and Photos 5 Stars

 

GOODREADS BLURB

 

A mysterious scarlet haired jazz singer.


A rebel on a motorcycle.


And a killer with a penchant for torture.

 

Food is scarce, good jobs the rarity, and big brother is watching everyone. Will Jack and Tom’s family be torn apart in the mayhem, and how far will one brother go to save the other’s life?

 

In 2041, America is rife with ghettos and armed checkpoints, and poverty runs rampant.

 

A bloody civil war is brewing, and everyone will be forced to take a side. Education is the only way out of a life where you’re never sure where your next meal will come from, or what you’ll have to do to get it. Tom aced his assessment tests and scored an education contract, giving him a way out of poverty. Jack isn’t so lucky.

 

When Jack, a spy for a rebel fraction, goes missing, only his brother Tom can unravel the mystery of his disappearance. He will risk everything to save his brother from Warren, a killer who enjoys torturing his victims and making them beg for mercy. On a mission, Tom plunges into a world filled with mystery and danger. When he also discovers that his family has been keeping secrets from him—secrets that threaten to doom them all—he doesn’t know whom to trust.

 

Tom must break every rule he’s lived by, and go head-to-head with a psychopath if he’s to have any chance of saving his brother—and just maybe, keep America from reaching the fracture point.

 

ABOUT JEFF ALTABEF

 

Jeff Altabef is an award-winning author who lives in New York with his wife, two daughters, and Charlie the dog. He spends time volunteering at the writing center in the local community college. After years of being accused of “telling stories,” he thought he would make it official. He writes in both the thriller and young adult genres.

 

In the Young Adult genre, Jeff co-authored the Chosen Trilogy with his teenaged daughter, Erynn. The Chosen Series has won multiple awards including the 2015 Readers’ Favorite Gold Medal for Best Coming of Age Novel, the 2015 Beverly HIlls Book Award for Best YA Fiction, and a Mom’s Choice Award.

 

As an avid Knicks fan, Jeff is prone to long periods of melancholy during hoops season. Jeff has a column on The Examiner focused on writing and a blog designed to encourage writing by those who like telling stories.

 

You can connect with Jeff on his website, Facebook, Twitter & Newsletter.

 

MY REVIEWS FOR JEFF ALTABEF

 

Red Death

 

 

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Source: www.fundinmental.com/early-review-the-future-is-now-fracture-point-by-jeff-altabef-jeffaltabef-novelpublicity
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review 2017-06-26 15:26
Angels Fall by Nora Roberts
Angels Fall - Nora Roberts

The only survivor of a brutal crime, Reece Gilmore has been on the road for a long time now. Plagued by phobias, obsessive compulsive disorder, and her many mental issues, she hasn’t stopped anywhere for long. But her car has decided to break down in the little Wyoming town, Angel Fist, and almost broke, Reece has no other option than to stop, and seek employment.
Soon, the little town starts feeling like home, she likes her job as cook in the local diner, and although she’s the stranger in town, hence object of curiosity, the jitters about hitting the road again haven’t hit.

Until she witnesses a murder during a hike one day, but no one believes her since there’s no proof, no other witnesses, and absolutely no sign of struggle. And it seems the violence of what she’s witnessed has put her recovery into regression, and she starts experiencing lost time again, moving things, doing things she cannot remember doing. She would probably skip town again if it wasn’t for another outsider, the man who held her together the day she witnessed the murder, the only man who believes her she did see what she claims she saw, Brody. And it’s also Brody the one who suspects there might be another explanation to her supposed lost-time episodes to the one of her going slowly crazy.

Someone is obviously trying to discredit her testimony, and drive her out of town...But what measures might they take if she doesn’t run?



Nice. Very nice. Intense, gripping, suspenseful, and skirting the edges of thriller with all the psychological warfare deployed by the villain toward the heroine. Very nice, indeed.

I loved Reece, not just liked, loved her. She was a mess with all her issues, her insecurities, her obsessive compulsive disorder, her phobias, but I didn’t find her annoying. I sympathized and empathized, but I didn’t pity her. As Brody said, she might’ve been a victim once, but she was a survivor all the way. She’d self-admitted herself into a mental institution, for crying out loud. She’d known she needed help, and she sought it. If that isn’t admirable, I don’t know what is. She also knew she had many screws loose, yet she coped, she tried to move on, she tried to live. And thanks to Brody (yes, unfortunately, the guy had to help somewhat) when push came to shove, she didn’t go down without a fight.

Now, as for Brody, I somehow didn’t get a really clear picture about him. The image, even the character of him still eludes me. He was there, I guess, a supportive entity, one of the few in town who truly believed Reese, a guardian angel of some sort, a brusque jackass which was just what she needed to get out of her funk, yet he remains obscure. A tall, dark, and handsome generic hero, who happened to get involved with Reece.

It’s weird, because it’s usually the other way around. It’s NR heroes I can clearly picture, while the heroines remain rather generic (and somewhat annoying).
I guess this is a “special” book, since the abovementioned fact isn’t the only thing that’s inverted. In this book it’s the heroine who embraces her feelings more easily, it’s Reece who expresses them first, and it’s the hero who’s scared, annoyed, and reluctant to move forward, to change the way things are, while it’s usually the other way around, with the heroines playing the “male part”.

The jewel of this story is the suspense, which is also a slight deviation from norm. Usually I enjoy the perfect combination of both, the romance and the suspense, but in this case, the romance (or whatever that was) took the backseat to the suspense. And yes, it was suspense. Not much action, not much danger, gripping nevertheless.
It was suspenseful, lurking, creeping slowly forward, keeping the reader at the edge of the seat, wondering whether it was truly all in Reece’s head or if there was something more sinister afoot. Very, very well done.
In the end, when Reece and Brody went out on their own, and the knots started unraveling, and the plot started thickening, I had two possible suspects—I had no idea about the villain’s identity until the end, so the big reveal came off as a surprise and not so much a surprise in the end.
I also felt the ending a tad too easy for the town-folk, with no vindication for Reece. I wouldn’t have minded a little groveling, but then, those that counted, believed her no matter what.

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review 2017-06-26 03:24
The Child
The Child - Fiona Barton
ISBN: 978-1101990483
Publisher: Berkley 
Publication Date: 6/27/2017 
Format: Hardcover 
My Rating: 5 Stars 

 

Join Me June 27 Blog Tour Host

Fiona Barton returns following her award-winning debut The Widow, landing on my Top 50 Books of 2016, with a riveting follow-up, THE CHILD — as readers catch up with journalist Kate from the first book.

From love and loss, a character-driven intense psychological suspense tale of three women. Emotional destruction — dark secrets and lies are exposed, a whodunit mystery keeping readers glued the pages to the twisty finale!

You can bury the story . . . but you can’t hide the truth.

“When truth is replaced by silence, the silence is a lie.” — Yevgeny Yevtushenko

Kate Waters, a journalist was bored. She needed a story. She soon finds an intriguing case and she will not stop until she writes the story and solves the mystery.

Headlined “Baby’s Body Found.”

An infant’s skeleton had been unearthed on a building site in Woolwich near London. The police were investigating. No other details. She tore it out of the paper to save for later as she often does when running across a potential story.

Who is the baby and how did it die? Who would bury a baby? How could anyone kill a baby?

When checking with the authorities she found newborns were tricky when it came to DNA especially if they have been underground for years.

Kate loved a glint of something in the dark. Someone to absorb her totally. Something to sink her teeth into. Anything to get her out of the office. She is obsessed with finding out the name of this baby. She wants the story. The Building Site Baby. Who drove someone to bury a baby?

 

 



From alternating POVs, we hear from Kate and the three women: Emma Simmonds, Jude Massingham, and Angela Irving. (enjoyed the way each section is clearly defined).

Angela’s newborn daughter went missing some 28 years earlier. Every March 20 she would cry, thinking of Alice’s birthday. She had less than twenty-four hours with her. The dread would come each year before the baby’s birthday. She could not put the painful memories behind her.

Emma suffers from anxiety and depression from her past. She knows that a secret takes on a life of its own. She must protect her secret. She will keep it safe.

“I’ve always thought that’s a funny saying. Let sleeping dogs lie. Because sleeping dogs always wake up eventually, don’t they?”



Angela soon calls Kate to find out more. Could this be her daughter? She has never given up hope her daughter would one day be found.

Jude had been a single mom in the late seventies trying to forge a new career with a child to look after, but the rent was cheap. It did not matter where she lived, she was caught in her own little world. She threw Jude out of the house when she was sixteen, choosing her boyfriend Will over her daughter.

How does this current tragedy connect these three women? Secrets threaten current lives. A nameless child.

With alternating time periods (2012-2013) with flashbacks to the 70s-80s, Kate continues to dig deep to solve the mystery of the baby. She begins looking at old missing children cases from the 70’s to the mid-1990s. (Loved Kate from The Widow) and her tenacity!

 

 


Barton captivates readers with an enthralling page-turner, as addictive and intense as her debut. How well you know those closest to you?

A well-written slow-burning whodunit suspense mystery with depth, Barton once again shines, using her own career as a journalist to enhance the intensity and mystery of the Building Site Baby. Even though each of the women brings emotion to the story, the real mystery to be uncovered comes from the relationship between Emma and Jude and how this connects with Angela.

Highly recommend, both The Widow and The Child. For fans of Mary Kubica, B.A. Paris, Clare Mackintosh, and Ruth Ware. These talented ladies are TOP-Notch authors and enjoy their writing style.

Often a psychological suspense makes a big impact, even though they may not always be edge-of-your-seat fast paced action. I also enjoyed reading about the inspiration behind the novel.

A strong theme of motherhood with a twisty surprise ending. A mother who has not given up after forty-two years. Readers will be drawn into the lives of each of these women. Savor and unravel the mysterious puzzle, with many red herrings. The tension mounts and all the secrets and lies surface. Enjoy the journey.

Well-crafted, twisty, addictive, and intriguing. Can’t wait to see what comes next. . .

A special thank you to Berkley and NetGalley for an early reading copy.

JDCMustReadBooks

 

 

 

 

 

 

  

About the Author

 

My career has taken some surprising twists and turns over the years. I have been a journalist - senior writer at the Daily Mail, news editor at the Daily Telegraph, and chief reporter at The Mail on Sunday, where I won Reporter of the Year at the National Press Awards, gave up my job to volunteer in Sri Lanka and since 2008, have trained and worked with exiled and threatened journalists all over the world.

But through it all, a story was cooking in my head.

 

The worm of my first book infected me long ago when, as a national newspaper journalist covering notorious crimes and trials, I found myself wondering what the wives of those accused really knew - or allowed themselves to know.

 

It took the liberation of my career change to turn that fascination into a tale of a missing child, narrated by the wife of the man suspected of the crime, the detective leading the hunt, the journalist covering the case and the mother of the victim.

Much to my astonishment and delight, The Widow was published in 36 countries and made the Sunday Times and New York Times Best Seller lists.

 

It gave me the confidence to write a second book ,The Child, in which I return to another story that had intrigued me as a journalist. It begins with the discovery of a newborn's skeleton on a building site. It only makes a paragraph in an evening newspaper but for three women it's impossible to ignore.

 

The Child will be published in June 2017 and I am embarking on my next novel. My husband and I are still living the good life in south-west France, where I am writing in bed, early in the morning when the only distraction is our cockerel, Titch, crowing.  

 

Read More 

 

 

 

 

"The ultimate psychological thriller! Barton carefully unspools this dark, intimate tale of a terrible crime, a stifling marriage, and the lies spouses tell not just to each other, but to themselves in order to make it through. The ending totally blew me away!"  --Lisa Gardner, #1 New York Times bestselling author  

 

 

Source: www.judithdcollinsconsulting.com/single-post/2017/01/03/The-Child
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review 2017-06-25 23:43
Don’t You Cry - DNF
Don't You Cry - Mary Kubica

Sometimes, rarely, very rarely, I will come across a book written in first-person, present tense that is either so well done, or where the writing and storytelling is otherwise so good that I barely notice it, or else where it is used only sparingly and appropriately to a particular scene. But the vast majority of the time, I hate it. Hate it. Hate it. And I thought I only had to be diligent in checking the preview on YA novels, but apparently this gawdawful trend is invading other genre fiction.

 

I listened to enough of the first chapter to know that I didn’t want to hear any more, but will not assign a star rating as I didn’t get to my minimum 20 minutes of audio time.

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review 2017-06-25 23:21
Camino Island ★★☆☆☆
Camino Island: A Novel - John Grisham

Deadly dull stuff. I couldn’t bring myself to care about any of the characters, and the main character’s moral rationalizing was frankly laughable. I’m not sure why the author even bothered telling us about any of the criminals who pulled off the heist. The plot was… well, I couldn’t bring myself to care how it ended, if the criminals were caught, if the university got their manuscript back, or if the writer and the bookseller reconciled their relationship.

 

I think the only reason I even finished this book is that I was listening to it while on a long road trip and the book was marginally more interesting than just looking at 200 miles worth of grass and trees and cows, although the occasional horse pasture was distraction enough for me to have to rewind.

 

Audiobook, borrowed from my public library. January LaVoy provided a very good performance, considering the material she had to work with.

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