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Search tags: Tiffany-Reisz
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review 2018-08-18 03:19
I hate this book
The Headmaster - Tiffany Reisz

I don't know why I pushed through once I started getting irritated with the weird regressive snobbery of the main character -- probably because this is short and maybe she'd pull her head out eventually. An English teacher on her last dime is driving up from the deep South to Chicago to crash on a friend's couch and hopefully find a new job. She doesn't really have anyone in her life: parents are dead, boyfriend took off to Africa to Peace Corps or something. She gets into a car accident on the way to Spooky Gothic Boys Academy, and wakes up in the headmaster's apartment. She hassles him for a job and he puts her on a one week probationary period. Here's where things start to go to shit. 

 

First, main girl starts hitting on the headmaster like it's her damn job. This is unbelievably unprofessional, if not downright unethical. Which fine, this is a Gothic romance, whatever. The real irritation set in when she began outlining her curricula, and I fully own what a dork ass thing that is to say. It's a boys' school, yes? With a very frusty hidebound reading list? And she's like, I won't bother them with Brontës or Austen because boys hate romance. What in the actual fuck.

 

This is actually, literally a romance novel, and we're going to have to hear a bunch of fucking bullshit about how 1) the Brontës and Austen wrote romance and 2) boys shouldn't have to read writing by women because it's all fucking romance. Jfc does that piss me off. Brontës were Romantics, no question (though Austen was not) but given that the modern romance novel wasn't invented until a century and a half later, they were not writing romance novels. Moreover, if they were somehow writing romance novels, given their position in the actual Western Canon, there is absolutely no justification for keeping them off a reading list for boys, other than boys might get cooties and feel uncomfortable, and their delicate fee-fees must be shielded from women who are apparently only capable of writing romance novels, because that is the only thing that women write. I recognize the run-on nature of the previous sentence, but that is just an indicator of my ire. 

 

This bullshit is repeated when Gwen(?) considers maybe she should include some works by black authors because there is a single black student who, it is assured to us assiduously, is completely extraordinary and the smartest kid in the school. (Black students are never allowed to be average.) Which is why the headmaster went to bat for him the previous year when he was the first black student in the school, and half the parents pulled their kids because they were racist shitheels. There's a (stupid) reason for why the school just integrated in the 21st fucking century, but Gwen does not know that reason. Headmaster gets all the cookies for standing up to racists, but it's full on bullshit that there are only white dudes on the reading list, and Gwen is all la la la maybe I should remedy that lol, instead of asking very pointed questions about what the fuck is wrong with a school that accepted its first black student in 20 fucking 18, let alone why there are only white men are on the reading list. But really she's much more interested in banging her boss before she even gets the job. 

 

The ending is where I blew my top, but I'm not sure I should get into it because of spoilers. I'll just say that the horrible, inert ending of the Twilight saga, which saw Bella and Edward locked into enduring middle class perfection for ever and ever amen is, for me, the worst kind of hell. Aspects of that were replicated here, with an added bonus of the death wish of such a vision made more explicit. There's medieval heresies based on what happens here, and while I'm not usually aligned with religious crackpots high on ergot, we are in accordance here. What a strange world we live in. 

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review 2018-05-29 14:29
Review: The Chateau by Tiffany Reisz
The Chateau - Tiffany Reisz

Reviewed for Wit and Sin

 

Working for a secret branch of the French military by day and seducing a number of women by night may be enough to occupy some men, but not Kingsley Boissonneault. No assignment, no assignation can fill his mind enough to rid him of the dreams of Søren, the love he can never get over. Until, that is, he’s tasked with going undercover and rescuing his commanding officer’s nephew from a sex cult run by the mysterious Madame. Madame’s world is like nothing Kingsley has ever seen. In the château, the women rule and the men serve. And as Madame’s brand of sadism feeds Kingsley’s soul, he’s faced with a choice: he can have everything he’s ever wanted, but the price is giving up forever the beautiful monster who haunt his dreams.

The Chateau is an interesting, evocative read that’s a fantastic mix of dark and light. Kingsley’s journey through the looking glass and into Madame’s world is filled with surprises, erotic adventures, and masochism. The château is a sort of reverse Story of O where the women rule and the men serve them in every way. In many ways it’s a lovely world, with warmth, humor, and sensuality. Madame is a sadist and a master at mind games, and she’s an interesting, well-developed character. It’s easy to see why Kingsley is fascinated by her and why he’s taken with the other women in the house. Whether or not the world Madame has created is what it seems or if there are darker elements at play, I’ll leave readers to discover. I will say that nothing is ever simple and straightforward when you’re playing with characters this clever and I loved the twists and turns Kingsley encounters over the course of the story.

At the center of The Chateau is the story of Kingsley finding himself again. Kingsley is a delightful protagonist. He’s young, arrogant, charming, protective, and funny as hell. He’s strong and deadly, to be sure, but he’s also incredibly vulnerable and I found the contrast appealing. Life in the château holds great appeal for him: beautiful women, the chance of a family, and a masterful sadist who can give him almost everything he needs. The almost part comes in because of Kingsley’s dreams about Søren, the former lover whose hold on him is still strong. I loved watching Kingsley learn more about himself and about his relationship with Søren over the course of the book.

The Chateau is a standalone book set in the world of Tiffany Reisz’s Original Sinners series. I haven’t yet read the rest of the books, but if I wasn’t already planning to I definitely would now because I was so intrigued by Kingsley and Søren’s relationship. Ms. Reisz is a master of pushing boundaries and mixing eroticism with emotion and charm. Her writing is always engaging, so much so that I started The Chateau late and night and read until I couldn’t keep my eyes open any longer, only to finish the book when I woke up the next morning. So whether you’re a fan of the Original Sinners series or are new to the world, this is an exceptional ride.


FTC Disclosure: I received this book for free from the publisher in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review.

Source: witandsin.blogspot.com/2018/05/review-chateau-by-tiffany-reisz.html
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review 2017-12-06 04:55
Review: One Hot December by Tiffany Reisz
One Hot December - Tiffany Reisz

My review cross-posted from Wit and Sin

 

 

One Hot December is wildly sexy, insanely funny, and quite simply a fantastic read. Every book in Tiffany Reisz’s Men at Work series has been incredibly addictive and Flash and Ian’s love story is no exception. It’s a wonderful romance that is so much fun I cannot help but smile when I think about it.

Flash is an awesome heroine. She’s got a quit wit (and sometimes a quick trigger), a spine of steel, and she’s refreshingly straightforward. She’s not afraid to be different, to speak up for herself, and I loved her strength. Flash isn’t invulnerable, though. She’s been hurt and has had to fight for respect more than once. I admired and adored Flash and wanted to see her find someone she could both love and trust. On the surface, Ian seems like an odd match for her. But the two of them simply click. Beneath the suit and the all-business demeanor, Ian is a funny, caring, deliciously filthy hero. Even though he is a wealthy businessman whose father owns the company he works at, Ian has worked hard to get where he is. He also has some hidden vulnerabilities. His mother died when he was a baby and one of my favorite parts of One Hot December was how Flash helped Ian connect with his heritage through his mother’s faith. The quiet moments of honesty and caring between Flash and Ian give this story its heart and are just lovely.

While I do love the emotional moments of One Hot December, it’d be a crime if I didn’t talk about how incredibly fun and dirty this book is. Humor in romance tends to be hit-or-miss for me, but the banter between Flash and Ian had me laughing out loud. And when Flash and Ian hit the sheets… Well, this book ain’t called One Hot December for nothin’. Ian and Flash could keep you warm in a snowstorm (not literally – please don’t attempt ;-)).

If you love holiday romances (and I admit to being a sucker for them, particularly Hanukkah romances), One Hot December has double the holiday cheer as it celebrates both Hanukkah and Christmas. I truly loved reading Ian and Flash’s story. It’s a festive and fun read that is guaranteed to delight all year long.


FTC Disclosure: I received this book for free from the publisher in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review.

 

Source: witandsin.blogspot.com/2017/12/review-one-hot-december-by-tiffany-reisz.html
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review 2017-12-01 22:07
Her Halloween Treat
Her Halloween Treat - Tiffany Reisz

Joey just found out that her boyfriend of 2 years is a lying, cheating, asshole. (He's married. And she didn't know. Had no clue, none). Her best friend's advice is to get laid and get laid now. Joey heads home a little early and runs into one of her best friends from high school, Chris. Chris (yes, you guessed it!) has been in love with Joey since high school. 
I liked that the first to fall was Chris. The banter between the two of them was fun. The secondary characters: Kira, Dillon, Oscar were all likable and added to the story. I really liked this, not sure why this took so long for me to finish it. (2 days for just over 200 pages).

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text 2017-11-23 23:40
The Angel by Tiffany Reisz $1.99
The Angel - Tiffany Reisz

Infamous erotica author and accomplished dominatrix Nora Sutherlin is doing something utterly out of character: hiding. While her longtime lover, S¿ren—whose fetishes, if exposed, would be his ruin—is under scrutiny pending a major promotion, Nora’s lying low and away from temptation in the lap of luxury. 

Her host, the wealthy and uninhibited Griffin Fiske, is thrilled to have Nora stay at his country estate, especially once he meets her traveling companion. Young, inexperienced and angelically beautiful, Michael has become Nora’s protégé, and this summer with Griffin is going to be his training, where the hazing never ends. 

But while her flesh is willing, Nora’s mind is wandering. To thoughts of S¿ren, her master, under investigation by a journalist with an ax to grind. And to another man from Nora’s past, whose hold on her is less bruising, but whose secrets are no less painful. It’s a summer that will prove the old adage: love hurts.

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