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review 2018-03-23 21:15
In Every Moment We Are Still Alive -- from tragedy comes poetry
In Every Moment We Are Still Alive - Tom Malmquist,Henning Koch

The first page opens in an ER trauma room where Tom's pregnant partner Karin's clothes are being cut off and her vital stats are being called out. Anyone who's ever been in one of those rooms will instantly feel the claustrophobia, confusion and terror.

The crisis never ends. It gathers new crises to attach to itself, and in the midst of it all is a young man desperately trying to keep himself together and put one foot in front of the other. Karin had a rare and aggressive form of leukemia. Beneath a breathing mask, she tells Tom she wants to call the baby Livia, and her health (which was great days earlier) deteriorates rapidly. Very soon they induce a coma, transfer hospitals in order to get cutting-edge care, deliver her baby and perform multiple interventions to no avail. Soon she is gone and Tom is left alone with Livia. Tom, who has been living a rather charmed life becomes a widower and the single father of a premature infant in the span of days.

Tom Malmquist went through this exact same thing, and as such, it's very hard to read this as fiction and impossible to be dispassionate about the book. It's a fictionalized autobiography. I have no idea which parts are which beyond the broad strokes. There is nothing maudlin, some absurdity (ie, the baby has to bring a legal suit against Tom to become his daughter because Tom and Karin weren't married. They lived together for a decade. He'd had a DNA test, but the baby is not automatically his, despite the fact that he is the one caring for her. I would say "only in America" but apparently not.) We go from the main story to flashbacks of when Karin was alive. It feels real - that at these moments, Tom the character is remembering Karin, so the flashbacks of her work well. There are others of his father, who is also dying when the book opens, and the main timeline is straightforward but there are many branches on this tree, all culminating in the sketch of a life from childhood to present. 

The final chapter is gorgeous and brims with love. It's set apart from the acute stages of the rest of the book and moves quickly through Livia's early years to her first days of staying alone at school. Tom has learned how to parent and while he says he feels like a bad parent, it's clear he is not. It's a compelling and tear-inducing final chapter full of poetry and hope.

Malmquist is a poet for real. Prose is a newer endeavor., and this story had to be prose. The book is in translation, and the translation feels very clunky at times. I can feel the poetry trying to break free, but it fails to do so, especially in dialogue. The writing doesn't always employ typical dialogue signifiers like breaks or quotation marks. This works extremely well when Tom is stressed and too much information is coming at him. But in the midst of something that could've worked well comes what may be an overly-literal translation. So everything is conveyed, but not always in the best of ways. When dialogue isn't being overly literal, the translation doesn't get in the way, but this is yet another book I would love to read in its original language. 

No matter the translation, this is a universal story that works despite moments of clunky dialogue. Well worth keeping an eye out for anything else to come from Tom Malmquist.

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text 2018-03-12 09:50
It's okay to cry [3/12/18]

I am just so weepy recently.

 

Everything gets to me. I am thankful today that I am able to be emotional. It just proves that I am human and no matter what I go through, I am still alive. So in saying that, I am also thankful I am alive. In my darkest moment, I think I don't want to be alive, but I know that is my demon depression talking.

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review 2018-01-12 13:11
Review For: Buried Alive, by Stacey Marie Brown
Buried Alive - Stacey Marie Brown

Buried Alive, by Stacey Marie Brown is the story of Hannah Jennings and Rhys Axton.  Hannah is returning home to Whistler, Canada after being gone about 9 years.  She has changed her looks and has adjusted her name around after her leaving and starting over.  Now trying to get her family and friends to go by the name she now prefers isn't her only problem.  She keeps remembering the accident that took it all away.  Rhys knows in the back of his mind that he has somehow met Hannah before but isn't coming up yet with how.  But with them both trying to forget the past hurts will they be able to move forward into anything more?

Source: www.amazon.com/Buried-Alive-Stacey-Marie-Brown-ebook/dp/B078C7J2TZ/ref=sr_1_2?s=digital-text&ie=UTF8&qid=1515355657&sr=1-2&keywords=Buried+Alive%2C+Stacey+Marie+Brown
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review 2018-01-01 23:42
Mennyms Alive, Mennyms #5 by Sylvia Waugh
Mennyms Alive - Sylvia Waugh

The previous two books varied in quality, but shared a general "bummer" feeling. The Mennyms had faced the prospect of annihilation and had taken it with dignity, if incredulously.  

What happened next was their discovery by humans, but only as some beautifully crafted rag-dolls. The heirs to the house the Mennyms had lived in for so many decades were a little put-out by inheriting a house fully furnished and packed to the rafters with things.

As a side-note I would have been thrilled, but most people are not me.

Anyway, a kind-hearted antiques dealer and doll-lover adopts the Mennyms and creates a space for them in the unused apartment above her shop. Then without even the help of an old silk hat, the Mennyms come back to life and must plan out their next move.

A logical end to the series, but somehow unsatisfying.

Previous: <a href="https://www.goodreads.com/review/show/2172014186">Mennyms Alone</a>

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text 2017-12-10 16:09
Burning Alive - Shannon K. Butcher

Book one in the Sentinels was good. I loved the adventure, the characters were strong and carried the plot well. The conflict was big and dramatic, definitely series in the making good, and the sub characters pulled the reader into wanting to know more about the Sentinels and their women. Drake has been fighting the war against the demons for centuries with no hope of peace of any kind coming his way. He feels his time is slipping away with each leaf that falls but isn’t willing to stop fighting until the very end. When he sees Helen across a diner with fear clouding her eyes he is drawn in, but when he touches her and his decades-long pain ends, he knows he will never let her go and will fight to keep her by his side. She has a crippling fear of fire and of burning alive. She has seen herself burn alive in her dreams her whole life and one man stands by and watches as she dies, smiling. When she finally sees him across the diner, she is frozen in fear, but can’t explain why she is so drawn to the man who is going to stand by and watch her die. When demons attack and she is thrust into a world she didn’t know existed, her life will never be the same again. And Drake is going to make sure she has no choice about the matter. Their story was great. Loved it and will read more in this series.

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