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Search tags: autobiography
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review 2017-05-11 22:35
Born to Run written and narrated by Bruce Springsteen
Born to Run - Bruce Springsteen

This is the best damn autobiography I've ever read or listened to, and I'm not even a Springsteen fan.

 

I am now, but not because of his music; it's because of his writing- his honesty, his humor, and his work ethic. His battles with depression and mental illness in his family must have been painful for him to admit, but it all rang true to me.

 

Don't get me wrong-I did have a few issues with him-most especially his reputation as a working man, or a rock and roller that represents the working man-and his not having worked a real job, (other than cutting lawns and carrying groceries to make the money for his second guitar), a day in his life! I guess I feel like he made up for that by doggedly pursuing his dreams and desires.

 

If you like Bruce Springsteen, or even if you don't, I highly recommend you read this book.

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review 2017-03-14 00:30
The Princess Diarist written and read by Carrie Fisher
The Princess Diarist - Carrie Fisher

 

Even though I'm not a Star Wars fan, I am a big fan of Carrie Fisher.

 

I loved how outspoken and honest she was about her life and mental health. After listening to The Princess Diarist I now love how honest she was about her affair with Harrison Ford. I also greatly enjoyed her talking about some of her fan interactions; they were hilarious!

 

It's nice to hear someone from Hollywood talking about how insecure she was about her hair, her weight, etc... You would never know it from watching Princess Leia and her buns of Navarone. (As she called them.) As a role model for strong women, one could do much worse than the Princess.

 

Recommended for anyone interested in learning more about Carrie Fisher and Star Wars!

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review 2017-03-10 22:33
Dared & Done: Marriage Of Elizabeth Barrett & Robert Browning - Julia Markus

After having a months-long thing about Markus’s biography of Annabella Milbanke Byron (Ada Lovelace’s mother), I definitely had to read her first biography about the marriage of Elizabeth Barrett and Robert Browning. I have a lot of feelings about Elizabeth Barrett Browning–mostly due to the fact that I wrote part of a senior thesis on the Sonnets from the Portuguese. In fact, Markus’s look at the Browning’s marriage as it relates to the sonnet sequence was probably the strongest part of the book for me. It’s very solidly researched and does a nice job of teasing out the circumstances of the Browning’s marriage in particular as opposed to Victorian marriage in general, and contrasting it with some of their friends who were less conventional. However, there were times when the organization was a bit confusing–jumps in chronology that muddled rather than clarified–and I found it less emotionally affective than I expected.

Source: bysinginglight.wordpress.com/2017/01/30/recent-reading-markus-lord-mcpherson-gonzalez
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review 2017-02-21 02:35
Book Review: My Bridges of Hope by Livia Bitton-Jackson
My Bridges of Hope - Livia Bitton-Jackson

I went into this book not really knowing what to expect — I’m not sure how it ended up on my family’s shelves, but I noticed it one day and added it to my to-read list for the future. Now, I have no idea where my copy of this book is, but luckily, the library had a copy. This is a memoir about a teenage girl’s coming of age after she survives the Holocaust and struggles to make a life for herself and make sense of the world after what she suffered, and after the turmoil that her country is put in post-World War II. It’s written in a very easy-to-read manner, so I can see this being a great introduction to older children and middle-graders as to what different people had to deal with during this time. It’s also a pretty quick read and told in short segments, so it would be easy to include in a Holocaust curriculum, at least in part.

 

This is apparently book 2 in a series, and I love that it follows the aftermath of the Holocaust, which I don’t think is talked about quite as much — or at least, my teachers never focused on it as much as the Holocaust itself. I’ve never read much about what happened to Slovakia after the war, so I enjoyed this book for giving me that perspective and teaching me more about all the different countries and people who were affected by the Holocaust, and how the surrender of Germany didn’t lead to immediately fixing anti-Semitism. Livia tells her story with painstaking honesty, and it hurt to see how roughly Jewish people were treated even after the war, and how hard it was for them to reunite with family members who had already emigrated to the United States or other countries. For some, it was even impossible.

 

Overall, I recommend this for someone who’s looking to learn more about this time period and what people had to deal with. In a way, it was heartening to read, because the community came together for each other and all supported one other so that they could make a better life for themselves. It’s still horrifying that any people were ever treated the way Jewish people were treated during this time, but reading about someone overcoming that hate and being an integral part in building up her community was heartwarming.

Source: www.purplereaders.com/?p=3418
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review 2017-02-12 11:15
As You Wish: Inconceivable Tales from the Making of The Princess Bride - Joe Layden,Cary Elwes,Rob Reiner

A fantastic, easy read that's a must for any fan of The Princess Bride. I loved Cary Elwes' anecdotes from behind the scenes and his sneak peeks at everyone involved in making the movie, which sounded like a blast. A wonderful reflection on one of my favourite movies.

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