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review 2018-03-13 02:38
The Divide by Jeremy Robinson
The Divide - Jeremy Robinson

First, I want to say that I love almost all of the books this author has written, but this one didn't do it for me. Unlike a lot of others, I am not a fan of the Kaiju theme, so I didn't dive right into this one like a many of his other books. It took me longer to finish than usual. I did appreciate the reference at the end to characters from his other novels that I love though.

 

If you like Kaiju themed books, I would give it a go. His Kaiju thrillers are very popular.

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review 2017-12-01 21:55
Poems of Rifts and Revelations
Permeable Divide - Ellen Rachlin Permeable Divide - Ellen Rachlin

Permeable Divide provides Ellen Rachlin's fourth volume of poetry and blends it with a philosophical observational style that is elegant in expression and rich in description and psychological insight. Take, for one example, the unexpected depth of 'Families': "Those slack wire acts that balance/by focusing near, love the sloped wire./First, there are the shakes of contorting bodies/then the hold while they juggle troubled kin/in each outstretched hand."

Readers are invited to reflect on various incarnations of what Rachlin describes as the "permeable divide", which consists of the gap between the living and a loved one lost to death, the rift between art and business, or the breaks that limit freedom and result in revolutions that may based be as much experiences of the past as the present.

Each poem is so different that this collection requires slow, careful, contemplative thought before realization sets in that each poem is actually interconnected, in a much broader sense. 'Divide', for example, also explores change, loss, and being lost in a different sense than 'Families' offered - yet, in a familiar way: "There is nothing to change/if you fit in/but that's the catch./To go from shore to mountaintop/you must adjust./The mind won't let go."

Permeable Divide captures confrontations with self, evolving efforts to change and grow, and how gaps are bridged or widened between life, death, and daily affairs in a succinct yet absorbing collection of images and ideas that requires slow, thoughtful reading from free verse fans and rewards these efforts with rich insights that linger in the mind long after the last poem is read.

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review 2017-10-31 00:00
The Stark Divide
The Stark Divide - J. Scott Coatsworth The Stark Divide - J. Scott Coatsworth Three people, two men, Jackson Hammon, Colin McAvery and a woman, Dr. Anastasia Anatov are sent out into the universe on ship called the Dressler or Lex for short, a living ship to find a place to build a new Earth on as the people are destroying the old Earth.

Over the years more and more people come to live and help to create this new Earth that is called Forever. Dr. Anatov returns after many years on Earth hoping to get some closure or maybe to set things right for what happened all those years ago on the asteroid before it became Forever. She needs to somehow make amends for what happened on the ship.

The world building in The Stark Divide was astronomical it sort of reminded me of Star Trek in some ways. I liked that the ship Lex has a mind of her own and was a living thing. The description of the ship and the new world was so amazing. The author made you fill as if you were there looking around in the universe and seeing it all up close.

If you like stories like Star Trek then I think you will love The Stark Divide. I would recommend The Stark Divide to all science fiction fans.
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review 2017-10-06 00:00
The Stark Divide
The Stark Divide - J. Scott Coatsworth The Stark Divide - J. Scott Coatsworth

The Stark Divide was a nice quick read. It was definitely a book that I didn't want to put down unless I absolutely had to. It plays with some familiar ideas, but does so in such a way that it doesn't feel 'been there, done that'. In it, we've basically destroyed Earth, but we don't have FTL travel yet, so we can't quickly get to another planet. Naturally, that means we have to turn to colony spaceships in the meantime. And that leads me into what I liked most about the book. From the initial ship that the story starts on, Coatsworth catches your imagination and opens your minds to the possibilities of meat and metal spaceships. From there, we move on to an O'Neill cylinder, but the author's way of developing one is definitely one you rarely read about. 


Really, the only thing I didn't care for about The Stark Divide was the decades long time skips. I didn't mind the first two, but the third one just seemed to rush things a bit. It felt like it was leaping to keep the drama high, and while I normally like full speed ahead, I just wished for a little more regular stuff here. Well, that, and although the characters were interesting, I wish we had gotten to know them a little bit more. Basically, it seems liked we just skimmed the surface for all the 'good' parts, and it felt like something was missing as a result.


Speaking of characters, I loved that three of the characters both carried a favorite book amongst their meagre possessions in The Stark Divide. At a time where every ounce counts, a book has to be extremely well loved. In one case, it was a journal. But the others were well-recognized sci-fi classics. It made me reflect on what book I would carry with me when everything was going to pieces. (Answer: My Kindle, because I couldn't just choose one book.)


While I have read a few science fiction books that had LGBTQ+ characters in them, it was generally only one or two at max. The Stark Divide is inclusive science fiction written by an author who was tired of not finding characters he could relate to in stories. Anyone who is seeking good science fiction within those parameters needs to take a look at The Stark Divide. This is a solid story with a diverse cast of characters where their sexuality and/or gender is present, acknowledged, but really not a big deal. There are same sex marriages, casual relationships, FtM characters, and more.


Earth was believably depressing, the spaceships were awesome, the relationship between the AI minds and some of the humans were great, and there was a solid amount of diversity present in The Stark Divide. This was a very entertaining book and I believe it's the start to a series with a lot of potential. Here's hoping J. Scott Coatsworth writes the epic saga this story begs to be the beginning of.




Disclaimer: I received a copy of this book from the author for review consideration.
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review 2017-10-06 00:00
The Stark Divide
The Stark Divide - J. Scott Coatsworth The Stark Divide - J. Scott Coatsworth

The Stark Divide was a nice quick read. It was definitely a book that I didn't want to put down unless I absolutely had to. It plays with some familiar ideas, but does so in such a way that it doesn't feel 'been there, done that'. In it, we've basically destroyed Earth, but we don't have FTL travel yet, so we can't quickly get to another planet. Naturally, that means we have to turn to colony spaceships in the meantime. And that leads me into what I liked most about the book. From the initial ship that the story starts on, Coatsworth catches your imagination and opens your minds to the possibilities of meat and metal spaceships. From there, we move on to an O'Neill cylinder, but the author's way of developing one is definitely one you rarely read about. 


Really, the only thing I didn't care for about The Stark Divide was the decades long time skips. I didn't mind the first two, but the third one just seemed to rush things a bit. It felt like it was leaping to keep the drama high, and while I normally like full speed ahead, I just wished for a little more regular stuff here. Well, that, and although the characters were interesting, I wish we had gotten to know them a little bit more. Basically, it seems liked we just skimmed the surface for all the 'good' parts, and it felt like something was missing as a result.


Speaking of characters, I loved that three of the characters both carried a favorite book amongst their meagre possessions in The Stark Divide. At a time where every ounce counts, a book has to be extremely well loved. In one case, it was a journal. But the others were well-recognized sci-fi classics. It made me reflect on what book I would carry with me when everything was going to pieces. (Answer: My Kindle, because I couldn't just choose one book.)


While I have read a few science fiction books that had LGBTQ+ characters in them, it was generally only one or two at max. The Stark Divide is inclusive science fiction written by an author who was tired of not finding characters he could relate to in stories. Anyone who is seeking good science fiction within those parameters needs to take a look at The Stark Divide. This is a solid story with a diverse cast of characters where their sexuality and/or gender is present, acknowledged, but really not a big deal. There are same sex marriages, casual relationships, FtM characters, and more.


Earth was believably depressing, the spaceships were awesome, the relationship between the AI minds and some of the humans were great, and there was a solid amount of diversity present in The Stark Divide. This was a very entertaining book and I believe it's the start to a series with a lot of potential. Here's hoping J. Scott Coatsworth writes the epic saga this story begs to be the beginning of.




Disclaimer: I received a copy of this book from the author for review consideration.
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