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review 2018-07-13 16:10
When bad guys go good...mostly
The Bad Guys: Episode 1 - Aaron Blabey

The Bad Guys by Aaron Blabey originally had me quite frustrated because I felt that the labeling (the library's call number) misrepresented the content of the book. [Essentially The Bad Guys was labeled as a Young Reader meaning that the intended audience was anywhere from 2nd-4th grade depending on the reading level of the child. I feel that it was more accurately categorized as an Easy Reader (1st-2nd grade) which is quite different and generally means there are less words and more illustrations per page. I'm mentioning all of this because while it might not matter to some (like if you're not picking up books for your kid(s)) it may have an impact on others.] This is the first book in a series (6 so far) which follows a crew of 'bad' animals: a wolf, snake, shark, and piranha (who is the funniest and fartiest). The wolf decides to round up fellow bad guys to change their image and reform their behavior. He is initially met with skepticism but throughout the book the other members of the club start to come around to his side and become quite enthusiastic about the enterprise. Their first mission is to break 200 dogs out of an animal shelter but from the outset there are large obstacles in their path...mainly how 4 dangerous animals are going to get in the front door of an animal shelter. Cue the shark coming up with a rather camp solution... The appeal of this book rests mainly in its silly humor and quick pacing. Young audiences will surely gobble this up and ask for the next in the series immediately. 7/10 because it didn't totally blow me away but I could see myself reading more for a quick palate cleanser (I may or may not have read the #6 already).

 

Blabey's website with the total list of books in this series (as well as his Pig the Pug series which is great fun): Aaron Blabey books.

 

 

What's Up Next: The Intuitionist by Colson Whitehead

 

What I'm Currently Reading: Unruly Places: Lost Spaces, Secret Cities, and Other Inscrutable Geographies by Alastair Bonnett & When Breath Becomes Air by Paul Kalanithi

 

Source: readingfortheheckofit.blogspot.com
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review 2018-04-14 03:28
The Beam Episode 1 Review
The Beam: Episode 1 - Sean Platt,Johnny B. Truant

Source: Netgalley

 

There is some excellent writing in this book. The authors obviously have a strong grasp on something that a lot of authors I’ve read recently have trouble with. That is, giving the right amount of description and avoiding massive unnecessary info dumps as I was subjected to in Ready Player One (I outright snickered when I hit a point where one of the characters is talking about a client’s ridiculously obsessive interest in the 1980s.)

The characters are interesting, and though not exactly fully-fleshed out, given enough depth that none feel like cardboard cut-outs. Though, to be honest, with some that’s a “just barely”. Mainly the songstress and her slightly The Goblin-esque husband. Kai, I think, is my favorite (probably because I’m always attracted to strong, self-confident women in literature.) Occasionally, early on, I got confused as to who was doing what, as there were several characters to keep track of, but as I read more and got to know them, I didn’t have that problem again. So I’d advise readers to stick it out if they feel like there’s too much happening. It does get easier.

One of the things that I really like about The Beam is how well the relationships are written. Nothing is floating-on-clouds perfect. People do bad things. People do good things. Sometimes bad people do good things, and good people do bad things. Just like it should be.

There are definitely more than a few pop-culture nods, but they are done in such a way that you just smile a bit when you see them, and then move on.

There’s nothing that I can truly criticize (beyond TBDCH (The Big Dang Cliff Hanger) at the end that’s meant to make us want to read the next season) and I admire the authors’ obvious talent.

Disclaimer: I received a copy of this book free from Netgalley in exchange for an honest review.
 

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review 2018-02-25 08:43
Patch Job
Patch Job (ReMade Season 2 Episode 1) - Gwenda Bond,Matthew Cody,Andrea Phillips,E. C. Myers,Amy Rose Capetta

Patch Job is the first episode in the second season of ReMade and rather than starting of where the first season ended (without answers on a cliffhanger), this starts something new. A character that was thought to be gone for good is in a sense ReMade all over and dropped into the world again. Also, there is a special connection with the caretakers.

I'm curious to see where this is going.

Thanks to the publisher and Netgalley for providing me with a free copy of this book in exchange for an honest review!

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review 2018-02-04 16:05
The Fixer #1.1 by Rex Carpenter
The Fixer, Season 1, Episode 1: (A JC Bannister Serial Thriller) - Rex Carpenter

What a surprise ending!
That wasn't what I expected at all. I had a feeling this would be good, but I didn't think it'd be that good. J.C is one bad-ass dude!!!
The best part for me, though the ending rocked, was how he dealt with a bunch of punks that broke into his place. Epic, I tell ya! I can't wait to start the next one, which there is five in total.
People who love action and tough guys will love this series!

 

 

Source: www.fredasvoice.com/2018/02/the-fixer-jc-bannister-11-by-rex.html
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review 2017-12-23 17:34
Review of Star Wars: A New Hope by Alan Dean Foster
Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope - Alan Dean Foster,George Lucas

This book was the novelization of the original Star Wars movie.  I have not seen the movie in quite some time, but other than a few very minor points, I think this followed the film completely.  It was entertaining to read and as books tend to do, it had the reader look more deeply into the thoughts of the major characters.  

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