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Search tags: handmaid\'s-tale
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text 2018-04-15 05:30
Reading progress update: I've read 100%.
The Handmaid's Tale: Special Edition - Margaret Atwood,Claire Danes

I finished this book the other day and I'm still trying to decide how I feel about it. I have several reviews I need to write. Looks like tomorrow is going to be a review day for me...

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text 2018-04-06 04:05
Reading progress update: I've read 25%.
The Handmaid's Tale: Special Edition - Margaret Atwood,Claire Danes

I feel like I need to listen to the ending chapters first and then start from the beginning. 

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review 2018-03-28 15:01
#20 - The Handmaid's Tale by Margaret Atwood
The Handmaid's Tale - Margaret Atwood

Honestly, I don’t know where to begin. It was a weird and disturbing read. I often felt anxious and not at ease while reading this book. 

I was not a fan of the writing style, it was just an endless stream of comments and stories and it is really not the kind of writing I like. I was sometimes confused, the dialogues were not written as such, without quotations marks etc. But I think it was important to the purpose of the story and it added a touch of authenticity. 

The topic of this book is really interesting and complex and it will leave you with a lot of thoughts. About women, mostly, but not only. I think I would have enjoyed immensely to read this book in high school and analyze it with the teacher and my classmates. It would have been really interesting and it would have helped me understand things that I did not fully comprehend. 

The plot was not particularly to my taste, but it definitely not what was important here. In the end, I really enjoyed this story and the ending was perfect. Such an open ending that will let you imagine a lot of different scenarios. However, I would have liked more insight on how things could have gone this far. How it was possible to let that happen. Even if, history will teach us that sometimes really crazy things can happen without you noticing it...

This story will definitely stick with me for a long time. 

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review 2017-12-21 20:10
Horrible, but great.
The Handmaid's Tale - Margaret Atwood

This was part of my real life book club.

 

And it was depressing. A very good book, a horrifying dystopia - especially in the current times.

 

At least the epilogue gave some hope within this world.

 

 

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review 2017-10-08 02:45
Nolite Te Bastardes Carborundorum
The Handmaid's Tale - Margaret Atwood

“Don't let the bastards grind you down.” 

 

 

The future fucking sucks. 

 

That's one of the lines from the promotional posters from The Handmaid's Tale on Hulu, and it's a good way to set the tone between the two works. While they both carry the same chilling version of a Dystopian (but still too close to home to be comfortable) future, the series has more of an aggressive tone, more of a willingness to bring it's evils down. The most noticeable of impact of that is June. Or, I should say, Offred. Because in the book, we never really learn Offred's true name, while in the series we receive it on the first episode.

 

They are different, but both of them are amazing interpretations. I recommend fans of the book to watch the show and fans of the show to read the book. I really loved both.

 

Back to our main character, Book Offred is very passive. Almost infuriatingly so, at times, until you remember she is simply a product of the extremely oppressive society that surrounds her. She has barely any fight left on her, because it was dragged away. And she is pale in comparison to other characters in the book, other man and other women, because Offred shows how deep the bleak world can cut someone who is simply normal (tv series Offred is tougher, because otherwise the series would be a little too slow for 10 chapters). 

 

“Better never means better for everyone... It always means worse, for some."

 

The Handmaid's Tale is a bone chilling book, a future where all minorities get permanently crushed under the boots of the ruling ones, but the true horror of the plot doesn't come on what's spoken. It comes on the chill horror of that which we never know. What happened to that one character? Where does the road lead, in the ending? We never know, and that's even more terrifying. Because our minds can take a hint. All we can conjure by our own is scarier than what the author could have told us.

 

This book is very topical. It was topical in 1985, and it's topical now. The true scary beings aren't the ones that are hidden under our beds, it's the very real ones that cross the street in front of us everyday. Not all humans are monsters, but all monsters are human.

 

The biggest character in the book isn't even our narrator. It's the unity. The unity of those that choose to fight against the power that holds them down, with very small gestures, or even bigger gestures. But still, they stand. It cannot end well. But it's better than no action at all.

 

 

“I want everything back, the way it was. But there is no point to it, this wanting.” 

 

 

Sentence: There isn't much I can say that hasn't been said before. But this is an amazing book, it's terrifying in the most subtle way, and it will jump at you when you're least expecting it. When it does... enjoy the ride.

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