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Search tags: dystopian
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review 2017-03-21 13:14
EMP: Heading Home
EMP: Heading Home - Wilson Harp

by Wilson Harp

 

This second book in a series starts not too long after the first book ends. David still thinks about his wife and daughter in Chicago, sure in his heart that they must have survived, and after his mother dies, there is nothing to hold him in his home town. Things are running as smoothly as can be expected in the little town and he wants to come back, but he resolves to find his family and bring them back too.

 

His developing relationship with his old girlfriend, Anne, is a complication. He thinks she understands that he can't very well bring her along to help find his wife, but she doesn't want him to travel alone when there are dangers along the way from survivors who haven't been as organized as their town. Without giving away too many details, David begins his journey well supplied and with companions who can watch his back.

 

At first things seem far too easy, and it isn't until the last quarter of the book that their journey runs into serious hazards. It was at this point that I began to think that this book was going to be all about the journey and leave me having to buy a third book if I wanted to see how it would all come out. However, the story did come to an end with most things resolved, though one loose end could become a new story. In a way it seemed a little rushed at the end and it did start to lose me when a reaction to something didn't feel realistic, but over all I did enjoy the story, if not quite as much as the first book.

 

As a contribution to the Dystopian genre, I think the series has a lot to offer in dealing with details of how people might react and deal with surviving in a collapsed world.

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review 2017-03-17 22:59
DEADLAND'S HARVEST by RACHEL AUKES
Deadland's Harvest - Rachel Aukes

Okay, wow, what a horrible-good ending - emphasis on the horrible. I'm just sitting here stunned. I'm hoping that some of the people were hiding behind the building - that's all I have to say. Well, except UGH!!!

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review 2017-03-16 16:48
100 DAYS IN DEADLAND by RACHEL AUKES
100 Days in Deadland - Rachel Aukes

Really enjoyable book - well as enjoyable as a zombie book can be. I usually don't like it when a book is full of inner dialogue but I felt this book was in need of a little of that. And I wish the military wouldn't have been so naive, especially when they'd been hearing about the militia doing stuff they shouldn't for a while. I don't think the military would have let things stand for as long as they had. Those are my only complaint. Cliffhanger ending. Can't wait to read the next book :)

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review 2017-03-16 00:39
Carve the Mark Book Review
Carve the Mark - Veronica Roth

There seem's to be a lot of hate surrounding this book. But I really enjoyed it. It's definitely very similar to a lot of other dystopians and reminded me a bit of the Red Queen. I'd say, for me it needed more world building. I felt like I forgot a lot that this was taking place in space at times and in ships. But I did love the characters and the overall plot line. I want to see more of Akos and Cyra. Looking forward to seeing where the series go. 

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review 2017-03-13 19:33
The Country of Ice Cream Star
The Country of Ice Cream Star - Sandra Newman

The Country of Ice Cream Star came to me almost by accident.  The library on post hosted an event around Valentine's Day called Blind Date with a Book.  I chose one based on nothing more than a genre and a vague blurb.  And it was unlike anything I've ever read.

 

It is a post-apocalyptic, dystopian, young adult novel set in the future.  It takes place in the remains of what was once the United States.  But disease and war has left the country decimated.  The overwhelming population is black or Hispanic, and even this population is left with a crippling disease that leaves what's left of the country run by children.

 

The story was fantastic, filled with sometimes subtle messages about society and values.  Faith, or the lack of it, plays a huge role in how new micro-societies have been formed and how they are run.  There are shreds of recognizable faith from our own reality, but it has been changed by the experiences these children have gone through and by time.  Race, too, plays a pivotal role.  It highlights how assumptions about race can evolve into entire belief systems.

 

But the most distinctive aspect of this book is the patois.  This is what made the book almost magical to me.  The book was written in an evolved version of street language, peppered liberally with Russian and French derivations.  Not just the dialogue, but the entire book.  From a technical standpoint, this awes me because of the sheer creativity it takes to undertake such a thing, and to do it successfully.  And this is not a short book.  As a linguist, this got my juices flowing.

 

Is it difficult to read?  Yes, it can be.  Having the language background that I do probably helped a little because I recognized a lot of the root words as French and Russian and could translate those easily.  Sometimes it was the evolved English that gave me the most trouble, words that had developed over fictional time to be used in different ways, in different forms and contexts.  Nouns that are now verbs.  Verbs that have become nouns.  Even familiar places are made unfamiliar with the new language.

 

This patois is something that I've seen turn many readers away, but I urge you to give this a shot.  It probably does take a great deal more concentration to read it, but the story is well worth it.  And the concept is just so unique that the experience is fantastic.

Source: thecaffeinateddivareads.multifacetedmama.com/?p=12722
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