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text 2017-12-09 16:34
Reading progress update: I've read 82 out of 203 pages.
The Ginza Ghost: and other stories - Ho-Ling Wong,Keikichi Ōsaka

"The Monster of the Lighthouse" - The Shiomaki Lighthouse has been having problems for a while now - instead of sending out light every 15 seconds, it has occasionally sent out light every 30 seconds, which has so far resulted in one sunken ship. Now something else has happened: one of the lighthouse keepers has been killed in a way that appears to point to the existence of a monster. A red, squishy, octopus-like monster somehow threw a 300+ lb rock from the sea into the lighthouse, crushing the keeper, and then invaded the lighthouse.

 

This story definitely captured my attention, but the explanation of what actually happened pissed me off. This is the second story

in a row in which a woman has gone murderously crazy.

(spoiler show)

At least in the previous story, all the details held together pretty well. This one, on the other hand, was just a mess.

 

Next up, "The Phantom Wife."

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text 2017-12-08 18:52
Reading progress update: I've read 66 out of 203 pages.
The Ginza Ghost: and other stories - Ho-Ling Wong,Keikichi Ōsaka

I have a three-day weekend, so I went to an eye doctor appointment (it went well! now if only the dentist stuff would resolve itself...), took care of some chores, and am about to go to a big craft sale. First, though, I sat down and finished Osaka's "The Mourning Locomotive."

 

D-:

 

Not only does this story have several gruesomely described animal and human deaths-by-train, the conclusion was horrifying. And also tragic, but mostly horrifying. I don't know how I feel about it as a mystery, but it's certainly going to stick with me.

 

Next up, "The Monster of the Lighthouse."

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text 2017-11-28 14:47
It's a miracle!
The Ginza Ghost: and other stories - Ho-Ling Wong,Keikichi Ōsaka

So I put in a renewal request for this early yesterday but got an error message telling me that I'd missed the renewal window. I was going to turn it in but forgot about it until after I got home. Oops.

 

I checked my email this morning to discover that a miracle had occurred. That renewal request that I thought had failed actually did go through. I now have an additional month to read this. I better get cracking!

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text 2017-11-27 01:21
Reading progress update: I've read 49 out of 203 pages.
The Ginza Ghost: and other stories - Ho-Ling Wong,Keikichi Ōsaka

My will to read has just about deserted me. We'll see if I can at least get to the halfway point on this.

 

"The Phantasm of the Stone Wall" was underwhelming and confusing. The only thing that makes it even vaguely memorable is the weird little "trick" it incorporated.

 

Still reading "The Mourning Locomotive":

 

"In a strangely calm manner, Sugimoto removed his hat and gloves, breathed on the palms of his lean hands, and rubbed the soot away from beneath his nose. This was a sort of tic of Sugimoto's whenever he discovered parts of a victim clinging to the wheels of the locomotive. By the way, D50-444 was such a gigantic locomotive, it was not unusual for the operators not to notice if they ran over one or two persons in the night."

 

::shudder::

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text 2017-11-25 17:46
Reading progress update: I've read 30 out of 203 pages.
The Ginza Ghost: and other stories - Ho-Ling Wong,Keikichi Ōsaka

This is due on Monday and I only just started it today. With my reading speed lately, there's no guarantee I'll manage to finish it in time, and it's unlikely I'll be able to renew it. On the plus side, it's an anthology of short stories, so all I need to do is finish whatever story I'm on by Monday, rerequest it, and continue on from there.

 

The introduction was a bit sad. The author wrote honkaku mysteries in the 1930s, before they became popular in Japan, and was soon forced to switch to comedy and spy stories. He was drafted and died of disease near the end of World War II, when he was only 23. If he had managed to survive, he'd have been around to see honkaku mysteries become popular.

 

I skipped most of the rest of the introduction after realizing that the descriptions of the stories, although not technically filled with spoilers, contained a little too my information for my tastes. I just got through with the first story, "The Hangman of the Department Store," and I'm pretty sure the introduction influenced my thoughts on the clues.

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