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text 2019-04-01 17:56
The "Chicago Treasure" Book Launch inspires and delights local families
Chicago Treasure - Larry Broutman,Rich Green,John Rabias

 

Over 250 Chicagoans came out to The Chicago Lighthouse to celebrate the release of the new book Chicago Treasure which stars local children, many of whom are preschool students at The Chicago Lighthouse for the Blind and Visually Disabled. In this inclusive hardcover book, photographs of Chicago children have been digitally imposed into fairytale illustrations, classic works of art, and photography of Chicago landmarks to create a colorful world where every child, regardless of ability, ethnicity, gender, or age is free to see themselves take on great roles.

 

 

The young stars enthusiastically flipped through the pages of Chicago Treasure until they found their pictures, then proudly shared them with friends and family. Chicago Treasure creators Larry Broutman, Rich Green, and John Rabias happily signed autographs until their hands hurt for the never-ending line of eager book buyers. But the fun didn’t stop there.

 

 

VisionQuest, a rhythm and blues band made of members of The Chicago Lighthouse Adult Living Skills Program, gave a dynamic performance that had the crowd cheering for more. Elsa sang “Let It Go” with some help from talented and starstruck youngsters. Tinkerbell and Peter Pan even stopped by to pose for pictures with their new young friends.

 

 

A puppet show, face painting, balloon animals, arts and crafts, ice cream sundaes, cupcakes, and cotton candy were enjoyed by the young and the young at heart.

 

 

The Chicago Lighthouse President & CEO Dr. Janet Szlyk and Board of Directors Chairman Gary Rich spoke to the crowd about Mr. Broutman’s support of The Chicago Lighthouse over the years, which includes serving on the Board and donating proceeds from Chicago Treasure and his three other books of photography to The Chicago Lighthouse and Access Living. Access Living President & CEO Marca Bristo joined in the praise of Chicago Treasure and reminded the crowd of the necessity of telling everyone’s story. Coming to the podium after thunderous applause, photographer and author Larry Broutman shared that the idea for this innovative project came to him in a dream to which a supporter in the crowd yelled, “Keep dreaming, Larry!”

 

 

Chicago Treasure is available now from publisher Everything Goes Media, on Amazon, and in Chicagoland bookstores and gift shops.

 

Find out more at:

https://www.everythinggoesmedia.com/product-page/chicago-treasure

 

 

Amazon

https://www.amazon.com/Chicago-Treasure-Larry-Broutman/dp/1893121798/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1546910366&sr=8-1&keywords=Chicago+Treasure+Larry+Broutman

 

*Photographs appear courtesy of Othervertical for The Chicago Lighthouse.

 

 

Source: www.everythinggoesmedia.com/product-page/chicago-treasure
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video 2019-04-01 17:30
Chicago Treasure - Larry Broutman,Rich Green,John Rabias

In this touching video created by The Chicago Lighthouse, photographer and author Larry Broutman shares his inspiration for creating the children’s book, Chicago Treasure, and what the process taught him about what inclusion truly means. Diverse children take the lead roles in classic fairytales and nursery rhymes when photographs of the kids are digitally imposed with colorful fairytale illustration backgrounds by Rich Green. Local children and their parents explain why seeing their faces in the pages of this book is so meaningful. Interspersed throughout are scenes from the Chicago Treasure Book Launch where 250 Chicagoans came to The Chicago Lighthouse to celebrate the release of this enchanting book.

Source: chicagolighthouse.org
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review 2017-03-03 01:47
The Delusion of Inclusion
The Delusion of Inclusion - Brian W. Smith

Title: The Delusion of Inclusion
Author: Brian W. Smith
Publisher: B.W.S.
Reviewed By: Arlena Dean
Rating: Five
Review:

"The Delusion of Inclusion" by Brian W. Smith

My Viewpoint....

What a interesting story that only this author can give to his readers! I will say by the end of this story I was in tears in how this author presented this novel so well to the reader. This was definitely a excellent read that dealt so well with today's 'prejudices and racial profiling' as we can see that racism still exist in our African American and Caucasian world. The characters [from Wood, Ryan, C- When & Paige] to name a few were all over the top. They were very well developed, portrayed and even humorous as times giving the reader one intriguing, thought provoking as well as a very emotional read that will give you a lots to think about long after the read.

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text 2014-10-23 03:37
The Shearin Group Leadership Training Tips: How to deliver successful diversity and inclusion results and benchmark your progress

As leaders in the accounting profession come to understand the business case for diversity and inclusion, they often have a similar quandary.

 

“The next natural question is, ‘So what do I do about it?’ ” said Kenneth Bouyer, CPA, chairman of the AICPA National Commission on Diversity & Inclusion and EY Americas director of Inclusiveness Recruiting.

 

New tools released Monday at the AICPA fall Council meeting are designed to answer the question of how to expand diversity and inclusion at a business or firm—and across the accounting profession as a whole. Both tools are available at aicpa.org/diversity.

 

The Accounting Inclusion Maturity Model gives firm and business leaders an opportunity to perform a comprehensive self-assessment of their progress in fostering diversity and inclusion. Firms and businesses can use the model to assess their practices in the workforce, workplace, and marketplace, and in community and supplier relations.

 

A second offering, the Recruiting and Retention Toolkit, highlights best practices for attracting, recruiting, and retaining a diverse workforce.

 

The National Commission developed the tools using the input of accounting leaders and others. The tools are part of Institute-led efforts to help the accounting profession better reflect the diversity of the clients and public that CPAs serve. In 2012, 11% of the people employed in the United States were black or African-American, and 15% were Hispanic or Latino, according to Bureau of Labor Statistics research.

 

In that same year, blacks or African-Americans accounted for 4% of the accounting employees and 2% of the partners at CPA firms, according to the most recent AICPA Trends supply and demand survey. Hispanics or Latinos made up 5% of the accounting employees and 2% of the partners at CPA firms.

 

While the maturity model will help leaders understand where their businesses and firms stand with relation to diversity and inclusion, the toolkit describes specific methods for improving their diversity and inclusion.

 

“This is going to answer the ‘Now what?’ question,” Bouyer said. “This toolkit will be a playbook to help you devise a strategy and a focus.”

 

The toolkit describes the business case for focusing on diversity and inclusion in the accounting profession, and provides steps businesses can take to improve their diversity and inclusion. It includes best practices for:

 

  • Attracting diverse candidates. This section discusses how organizations prepare themselves to be attractive to under-represented minority candidates by doing such things as obtaining leadership buy-in, setting clear short-term and long-term goals, and assessing employee engagement around current opportunities for creating a more inclusive work environment. “What does your brand look like?” Bouyer said. “How are you positioned to be successful? How well do your folks in your organization understand the need and why you’re focusing on this space?”

 

  • Recruiting a diverse workforce by perfecting job postings to better define how candidates will fit into the larger picture, developing recruitment plans, training recruiters and human resources professionals to recognize the obstacle of unconscious bias, and delivering consistent interview experiences for all candidates. Bouyer uses a fishing analogy, saying that leaders and recruiters may need to fish in a different pond to catch different kinds of fish. “You have to do different things to attract diverse talent,” he said.

 

  • Retaining under-represented minorities at an organization. Tips include conducting “stay interviews.” Turning exit interviews on their heads, these give employees an opportunity to share what’s working for them—and what can be done to improve the overall workplace culture.“You’re not the only organization that’s interested in the power of diversity and inclusion and diverse talent,” Bouyer said. “So your folks will be highly sought after in the marketplace. You have to think about different retention strategies to retain and ultimately advance this really talented group of people that you’re spending a fair amount of effort to get into your organization.”

 

As more organizations use the maturity model, an anonymized database will be built to allow them to benchmark where they stand on diversity and inclusion compared with similar organizations.

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text 2014-10-22 02:56
The Shearin Group Leadership Training Tips: How to deliver successful diversity and inclusion results and benchmark your progress

As leaders in the accounting profession come to understand the business case for diversity and inclusion, they often have a similar quandary.

 

“The next natural question is, ‘So what do I do about it?’ ” said Kenneth Bouyer, CPA, chairman of the AICPA National Commission on Diversity & Inclusion and EY Americas director of Inclusiveness Recruiting.

 

New tools released Monday at the AICPA fall Council meeting are designed to answer the question of how to expand diversity and inclusion at a business or firm—and across the accounting profession as a whole. Both tools are available at aicpa.org/diversity.

 

The Accounting Inclusion Maturity Model gives firm and business leaders an opportunity to perform a comprehensive self-assessment of their progress in fostering diversity and inclusion. Firms and businesses can use the model to assess their practices in the workforce, workplace, and marketplace, and in community and supplier relations.

 

A second offering, the Recruiting and Retention Toolkit, highlights best practices for attracting, recruiting, and retaining a diverse workforce.

 

The National Commission developed the tools using the input of accounting leaders and others. The tools are part of Institute-led efforts to help the accounting profession better reflect the diversity of the clients and public that CPAs serve. In 2012, 11% of the people employed in the United States were black or African-American, and 15% were Hispanic or Latino, according to Bureau of Labor Statistics research.

 

In that same year, blacks or African-Americans accounted for 4% of the accounting employees and 2% of the partners at CPA firms, according to the most recent AICPA Trends supply and demand survey. Hispanics or Latinos made up 5% of the accounting employees and 2% of the partners at CPA firms.

 

While the maturity model will help leaders understand where their businesses and firms stand with relation to diversity and inclusion, the toolkit describes specific methods for improving their diversity and inclusion.

 

“This is going to answer the ‘Now what?’ question,” Bouyer said. “This toolkit will be a playbook to help you devise a strategy and a focus.”

 

The toolkit describes the business case for focusing on diversity and inclusion in the accounting profession, and provides steps businesses can take to improve their diversity and inclusion. It includes best practices for:

 

  • Attracting diverse candidates. This section discusses how organizations prepare themselves to be attractive to under-represented minority candidates by doing such things as obtaining leadership buy-in, setting clear short-term and long-term goals, and assessing employee engagement around current opportunities for creating a more inclusive work environment. “What does your brand look like?” Bouyer said. “How are you positioned to be successful? How well do your folks in your organization understand the need and why you’re focusing on this space?”

 

  • Recruiting a diverse workforce by perfecting job postings to better define how candidates will fit into the larger picture, developing recruitment plans, training recruiters and human resources professionals to recognize the obstacle of unconscious bias, and delivering consistent interview experiences for all candidates. Bouyer uses a fishing analogy, saying that leaders and recruiters may need to fish in a different pond to catch different kinds of fish. “You have to do different things to attract diverse talent,” he said.

 

  • Retaining under-represented minorities at an organization. Tips include conducting “stay interviews.” Turning exit interviews on their heads, these give employees an opportunity to share what’s working for them—and what can be done to improve the overall workplace culture.“You’re not the only organization that’s interested in the power of diversity and inclusion and diverse talent,” Bouyer said. “So your folks will be highly sought after in the marketplace. You have to think about different retention strategies to retain and ultimately advance this really talented group of people that you’re spending a fair amount of effort to get into your organization.”

 

As more organizations use the maturity model, an anonymized database will be built to allow them to benchmark where they stand on diversity and inclusion compared with similar organizations.

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