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text 2020-09-23 11:43
Veterinary Care Market is expected to reach $9 billion by 2025, at a CAGR of 7.3%

The veterinary care market is expected to foresee positive trends throughout the forecast period. Substantial market growth can be attributed to the rising initiatives undertaken by the regulatory authorities. Government authorities collaborate with veterinarians and develop schemes that assure the availability of optimum inventory at fields for treating the farm animals.

MarketsandMarkets forecasts the global Latin America animal health market size is projected to reach around USD 9 billion by 2025 from around USD 5.2 billion in 2018, at a CAGR of 7.3% during the forecast period.

 

An increase in demand for animal health products showcases growth trends for the veterinary care market. There has been a considerable demand for animal health products in Asian countries, and the animal health market is predicted to grow at 5.2% during the forecast period.

 

Download PDF Brochure: https://www.marketsandmarkets.com/pdfdownloadNew.asp?id=78396315

 

Global Veterinary Care Market is Segmented on:

1. Treatment Type
2. Animal Type

 

Treatment Type

The animal type segment of the veterinary care market is bifurcated further into dogs, cats, pigs, poultry, cattle, and horses. Livestock animals such as cattle and poultry are expected to experience higher medicalization rates during the forecast years. In emerging economies such as the Philippines and Vietnam, earlier, poultry health was neglected, and owners used to discard the chickens in bulk during a virus outbreak. Similar was the condition of a few cattle farms. Unorganized farms were often neglected, and that hampered the overall meat production in such countries. However, the current laws have been framed to scrutinize the situation in farms and ensure maximum animal protection.

 

Animal Type

Based on the type of treatment, the veterinary care market is segmented into no medicalization, basic medicalization, and under veterinary care. The percentage of non-medicalized animals is going to experience a decline over the next few years. The major reason behind this sharp decrease in no medicalization in animals is rising awareness amongst the farm as well as the pet owners. Moreover, government initiatives to promote animal welfare has also raised the medicalization rate in animals; thus, proving beneficial for the overall market.

 

Request Sample Pages: https://www.marketsandmarkets.com/requestsampleNew.asp?id=78396315

 

The geographical regions mapped in the report are:
1. Europe
2. Asia Pacific
3. Latin America
4. Africa

 

Geographical Growth Analysis:

Latin America is one of the regions that has experienced significant growth in animal health space for the past few years. Countries such as Brazil and Argentina have shown potential demand for veterinary products and services. Several major players in the veterinary space have considered expansion Latin America due to the enormous growth opportunities it offers in the animal health industry.

 

Some key players mentioned in the research report are:

The leading players in the animal treatment market include Zoetis (US), Merck (US), Boehringer Ingelheim (Germany), Elanco (US), Ceva (France), Phibro Animal Health Corporation (US), Virbac SA (France), IDEXX Laboratories, Inc., Neogen Corporation (US), Heska Corporation (US) and others. These players undertake several strategic initiatives such as mergers, acquisitions, new product launches, and geographical expansions that helps them in sustaining market competition.

Source: www.marketsandmarkets.com/Market-Reports/veterinary-care-market-78396315.html
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review 2020-08-25 21:30
El Norte by Carrie Gibson
El Norte: The Epic and Forgotten Story of Hispanic North America - Carrie Gibson

This is a very informative book about the Hispanic role in North American history, from the first arrival of the Spanish in the western hemisphere, through their colonization of what is today Florida, Texas, California and much of the rest of the American West, to the U.S.’s wars with Mexico and Spain and its troubled relationship with Puerto Rico, to the role of Hispanic culture in the U.S. and the treatment of Hispanic citizens and immigrants. At 437 pages of text (followed by endnotes etc.), it covers a lot, though it also has to keep moving fairly quickly to get through it all. It’s written to be accessible to the general reader, though I found it more interesting when I was able to devote larger amounts of time to keep all the facts straight.

There are a lot of facts here, and not a lot of analysis, which is a little bit too bad because I have the feeling the author has a lot more to say but was trying to keep her opinions out of it. It’s definitely a big-picture approach, a view of all of post-contact American history side-by-side with the history of the nearest Spanish-speaking colonies and countries, but with a fair amount of detail about key events and players. The author also accomplishes a rare feat in a book focused on a particular disadvantaged group in American society, which is that she doesn’t forget about the others: some of this history overlaps quite significantly with the U.S.’s treatment of Native Americans and African-Americans, which Gibson doesn’t shy away from (and treatment of Asians is touched on as well). While little of the history was entirely new to me, I was still struck by, for instance, the extent to which southern slaveowners hoped to take over Cuba, several Mexican states, and possibly other southern neighbors in order to extend slavery. My biggest complaint is that the book could have been clearer about the implications of how the Mexican-American War got started. But I particularly appreciated the way the author relates the history of Mexico side-by-side with the U.S.; although we're neighbors, I'm not sure I've actually seen these histories in the same work before.

Overall, this is an interesting and accessible history that provides as comprehensive a view of the long history of Spanish-speaking people and their descendants in the U.S. as I’ve ever seen. It’s a useful perspective and a worthwhile read.

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text 2019-11-30 22:52
24 Festive Tasks: Door 7 - International Day for Tolerance: Task 4

I've been lucky enough to have been able to visit a fair number of World Heritage Sites already -- I don't explicitly go out to "collect" visits to them, but whenever I'm traveling and one of these sites is in the vicinity, I'll at least try to include it in my plans.

 

Of the places I have not visited yet, two are at the very top of my list: Lillelara's pick, Agkor (Wat), and ... Machu Picchu.  And however much I might be interested in pretty much any other place in the world, if it comes down to "one -- and one only", as you might have guessed from my post about that long-ago trip to Mexico and Guatemala, anything "Precolumbian civilizations" will virtually always win the day.  Especially if it's the capital of one of the most legendary and powerful Precolumbian empires (that of the Incas), is acutely in danger of vanishing forever if its protection is not jacked up something sharpish, and has got this sort of breathtaking a location ... I mean, just look at it!

 

From the UNESCO website:

"Machu Picchu stands 2,430 m above sea-level, in the middle of a tropical mountain forest, in an extraordinarily beautiful setting. It was probably the most amazing urban creation of the Inca Empire at its height; its giant walls, terraces and ramps seem as if they have been cut naturally in the continuous rock escarpments. The natural setting, on the eastern slopes of the Andes, encompasses the upper Amazon basin with its rich diversity of flora and fauna.

 

Embedded within a dramatic landscape at the meeting point between the Peruvian Andes and the Amazon Basin, the Historic Sanctuary of Machu Picchu is among the greatest artistic, architectural and land use achievements anywhere and the most significant tangible legacy of the Inca civilization. Recognized for outstanding cultural and natural values, the mixed World Heritage property covers 32,592 hectares of mountain slopes, peaks and valleys surrounding its heart, the spectacular archaeological monument of “La Ciudadela” (the Citadel) at more than 2,400 meters above sea level. Built in the fifteenth century Machu Picchu was abandoned when the Inca Empire was conquered by the Spaniards in the sixteenth century. It was not until 1911 that the archaeological complex was made known to the outside world.

 

The approximately 200 structures making up this outstanding religious, ceremonial, astronomical and agricultural centre are set on a steep ridge, crisscrossed by stone terraces. Following a rigorous plan the city is divided into a lower and upper part, separating the farming from residential areas, with a large square between the two. To this day, many of Machu Picchu’s mysteries remain unresolved, including the exact role it may have played in the Incas’ sophisticated understanding of astronomy and domestication of wild plant species.

 

The massive yet refined architecture of Machu Picchu blends exceptionally well with the stunning natural environment, with which it is intricately linked. Numerous subsidiary centres, an extensive road and trail system, irrigation canals and agricultural terraces bear witness to longstanding, often on-going human use. The rugged topography making some areas difficult to access has resulted in a mosaic of used areas and diverse natural habitats. The Eastern slopes of the tropical Andes with its enormous gradient from high altitude “Puna” grasslands and Polylepis thickets to montane cloud forests all the way down towards the tropical lowland forests are known to harbour a rich biodiversity and high endemism of global significance. Despite its small size the property contributes to conserving a very rich habitat and species diversity with remarkable endemic and relict flora and fauna.

 

 

[...]

 

Tourism itself represents a double-edged sword by providing economic benefits but also by resulting in major cultural and ecological impacts. The strongly increasing number of visitors to the Historic Sanctuary of Machu Picchu must be matched by an adequate management regulating access, diversifying the offer and efforts to fully understand and minimize impacts. A larger appropriate and increasing share of the significant tourism revenues could be re-invested in planning and management. The planning and organization of transportation and infrastructure construction, as well as the sanitary and safety conditions for both tourists and new residents attracted by tourism requires the creation of high quality and new long-term solutions, and is a significant ongoing concern.

 

Since the time of inscription consistent concerns have been expressed about ecosystem degradation through logging, firewood and commercial plant collection, poor waste management, poaching, agricultural encroachment in the absence of clear land tenure arrangements, introduced species and water pollution from both urban waste and agro-chemicals in the Urubamba River, in addition from pressures derived from broader development in the region. It is important to remember that the overall risks are aggravated by the location in a high altitude with extreme topography and weather conditions and thus susceptibility to natural disasters. Continuous efforts are needed to comply with protected areas and other legislation and plans and prevent further degradation. There is also great potential for restoring degraded areas."

 

All images in this post from the UNESCO website:
(c) Silvan Rehfeld, Geoff Steven, and Ko Hon Chiu Vincent

 

(Task: If you were offered an all-expenses-paid trip to one (one only!) of UNESCO’s World Heritage Sites, which one would you pick (and why)?)

 

 

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url 2019-11-21 12:13
Latin America Palm Oil Market Report

Market Outlook

 

The LATAM palm oil market attained almost 4 million metric tons in 2018. The region accounts for 6% of the global production. Although its share is comparatively smaller than the 85% to 90% share of Indonesia and Malaysia, LATAM’s projected robust growth of its palm oil production will contribute to the growth of the global market in the forecast period. The global market is expected to grow at a CAGR of almost 1.9% in the forecast period of 2019-2024.

 

Read full report with toc - https://www.expertmarketresearch.com/reports/latam-palm-oil-market

Source: www.expertmarketresearch.com/reports/latam-palm-oil-market
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url 2019-11-14 13:41
Latin America Carbon Black Market Share

The Latin America carbon black market attained a production volume of almost 0.6 million metric tons in 2018. It is expected to grow further in the forecast period of 2019-2024 and will aid the growth of the global industry. The global market is projected to grow at a CAGR of 4.3% between 2019 and 2024.

 

Although the share of Latin America in the industry is comparatively smaller as compared to Asia Pacific, Europe, and North America, the industry is expected to grow at a steady pace in the coming years driven by the region’s recovering automobiles industry. The region also exports significant quantities of low-cost carbon black from China to meet the rising local demand. Brazil, especially, is a growing market for the substance due to its thriving automobiles industry. The expanding plastic and rubber industries in the industry is also propelling the market forward. Mexico is another significant market in the Latin American region.

 

Read full report with TOC - https://www.expertmarketresearch.com/reports/latam-carbon-black-market

Source: www.expertmarketresearch.com/reports/latam-carbon-black-market
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