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Search tags: slice-of-life
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review 2019-07-14 02:49
A bit of reality
Like Pickle Juice on a Cookie - Julie Sternberg,Matthew Cordell

I am all for works of fantasy and sci-fi to tell stories that pull the reader into different worlds and experiences. However, there's something to be said about introducing a piece of realistic fiction to an emerging reader so that they can feel that 'so someone has felt the same things that I have' feeling. When you're growing up, it's so easy to feel isolated and alien. You feel like your problems are huge and that no one could possibly understand your pains, frustrations, or anguish. And then a little book like this one comes along. Like Pickle Juice on a Cookie by Julie Sternberg follows a little girl called Eleanor who experiences suffers abandonment and all the attendant stages of grief that come along after when the babysitter she's had her entire life moves away. With Eleanor's adjustment to a new babysitter who is wholly different from Bibi, she learns that sometimes change is good and relationships can survive distance. This is a good lesson for us all I think. This book is perfect for the emerging reader (probably why it was recommended in Excellent Books for Early and Eager Readers). It's written in short, simple sentences (somewhat oddly structured on each page) with illustrations by Matthew Cordell liberally spread throughout.  7/10

 

What's Up Next: The Doll People by Ann M. Martin with pictures by Brian Selznick

 

What I'm Currently Reading: The Gods Themselves by Isaac Isamov

Source: readingfortheheckofit.blogspot.com
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review 2019-06-30 02:16
The value of the dollar was VERY different in the 1940s
The Saturdays - Elizabeth Enright

The Saturdays by Elizabeth Enright was one of the titles mentioned in the Excellent Books for Early and Eager Readers that I reviewed not too long ago and one of the first from my holds list that I picked up to read. Firstly, even though this book was written in the 1940s it's still very readable for a contemporary middle grade (or adult in my case) audience. The book follows the 4 Melendy children (Mona, Rush, Randy, and Oliver) who are described (and drawn) with loving detail by the author along with their father, Cuffy the housekeeper, and Willy Sloper the handyman. The basic premise of the book (which is the first in a 4 part series by the way) is that the four children form a club to stave off their boredom wherein they pool their weekly allowances so that every Saturday they can each afford to go on solo adventures and do something that they really want to do (but which will likely not appeal to anyone else). Their interests much like their personalities were realistic for the time period in which the book was written although they feel somewhat far-fetched in comparison to today's children (one of the kids is obsessed with opera). Each of their Saturday adventures comes complete with peril (of the lightest variety) and life lessons learned so that there are built-in morals (sometimes heavy-handed) built into the narrative. I liked it but it's probably not going to be the first book I think of to recommend...unless the kid really digs the opera in which case I am ready. 6/10

 

What's Up Next: Lumberjanes Vol 1: Beware the Kitten Holy by Noelle Stevenson (might be a masterpost with more volumes included)

 

What I'm Currently Reading: The Umbrella Academy, Volume 1: Apocalypse Suite by Gerard Way & Gabriel Ba

Source: readingfortheheckofit.blogspot.com
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review SPOILER ALERT! 2019-06-08 03:45
Go For It, Nakamura! - Syundei 春泥

 

I needed something light and fluffy while I was reading The Song of Achilles. I usually read something light-hearted after or during something like TSOA. Go for it, Nakamura fits the former. 

 

The manga is about Nakamura who has a crush on his classmate, Hirose and his hilarious attempts to get close to him. Nakamura is an easy character to relate to in many ways, and he is adorable when he tries to make small talk. Hirose is also cute as well. I went "aww, so cute" during the aquarium scene. Not only is their interaction entertaining to read, but the other characters' as well. The ending might be off-putting for some people because it ends ambiguously. Nakamura and Hirose become friends, but the conclusion doesn't outright say if they become a couple though it looks like there is a high chance that they upgrade to a couple soon.

 

The art style reminds me of some the classic 80s and 90s manga I've seen in the past, but with some modern-day flavors. The rounded and soft style goes well with this sweet story of an awkward young man. I wish there were more color pages because the colors go well with the artwork. The artwork still looks vibrant in black and white. 

 

The author has another work available in English, and I'm hoping it is as good as this one shot.    

 

(spoiler show)

 

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text 2019-05-25 01:45
Update
The Whale Rider - Witi Ihimaera

My copy of Whale Rider arrived today. I watched the movie years ago, and I enjoyed it. Until recently, I didn't know that the movie was originally a book. So I went out and search for a copy on the internet. It wasn't easy since most of the bookstores I came across didn't have any copies in stock or if they have any, the prices were ridiculously high. I finally found a used copy in "very good" condition for a low price and free shipping.

 

I'm surprised how the book is in excellent condition for something labeled "very good" and costs under $5.

 

I wish I could read it now, but I'm still busy with other books.    

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review 2019-05-17 18:10
Self-deprecating hilarity
Adulthood is a Myth: A Sarah's Scribbles Collection - Sarah Andersen
Big Mushy Happy Lump: A Sarah's Scribbles Collection - Sarah Andersen
Herding Cats - Sarah Andersen

Adulthood is a Myth by Sarah Andersen marks the beginning of her illustrated web comic being released in book format. Andersen's art is full of humor about her day-to-day life as a single lady who'd rather stay at home than socialize. [A/N: If you're not into jokes about menstruation then this isn't the book for you.] A lot of her jokes focus on how she doesn't want kids, in general doesn't like people, and prefers to stay at home to eat and sleep. (Some of these things seem eerily familiar to me...) Her art style is quite cartoon-y and definitely keeps the feel of her beginnings as an Internet comics artist (in the best way possible).

 

Good ol' menstrual humor featuring my legs.

 

Who among us hasn't done this?

 

 

Her sequel, Big Mushy Happy Lump, showcases relatable female humor at its best. She really leans into the jokes examining her introverted/socially awkward personality traits. She added an end section to this book where she talks directly to the reader about how she feels/acts in social situations. She also discusses at length why she's a sweater thief forever and always. It's really cute and I think it's a great way to connect more with her audience. 

 

I think you get why I took a picture of this one.

 

#truestory

 

I didn't choose this life. This life chose me.

 

And finally there's Andersen's Herding Cats which (surprise surprise) features a lot of cat comics. In Big Mushy Happy Lump Sarah talks about how she has never been a 'pet' person but after she cat-sit for her mom this completely changed and this book examines her obsession with all things feline. This book has a phenomenal end section about navigating the Internet as an artist. Biggest takeaway: Keep making art. 

 

I laugh every time I see this.

 

That last one is how I feel during storytime at work.

 

What's Up Next: Excellent Books for Early and Eager Readers by Kathleen T. Isaacs

 

What I'm Currently Reading: Doctor Proctor's Fart Powder by Jo Nesbo with illustrations by Mike Lowery

 

Source: readingfortheheckofit.blogspot.com
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