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review 2019-03-17 19:45
The Hatching by Ezekiel Boone

[Spider phobia warning]

27276264
I liked it but was bored with all the unneeded backstory of every character, even the minor ones who are just there to be killed. It was annoying how shallow this book was. It's about killer spiders, yet everyone is talking about how good looking they are and how their sex life is.

I've never been a huge fan of books with a lot of POV changes and there were so many characters that it was hard to know who is who. Too many to really feel an attachment to, so I felt nothing when they were killed.

The spider scenes were creepy and if you have a phobia, I'm sure it would be horrifying, but I would not say this book is horror at all. The first 100 pages felt like they were dragging and I couldn't help feeling bored. After a very intense scene with a rich man in an airplane (you know the one if you read the book), the whole book got a lot better.

However, the book ended with a boring cliffhanger, which was more annoying than anything. A lot of things went unanswered in the first book, so we can only hope the next book answers them and they don't end up being plot holes.


I'm currently reading the next book, Skitter and I'm liking it a lot better!

Source: www.goodreads.com/book/show/27276264-the-hatching
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review 2019-01-21 21:59
The Very Busy Spider
The Very Busy Spider - Eric Carle

The Very Busy Spider was published in 1984 by Eric Carle. This story is about a busy farm yard spider that will not stop spinning her web despite how many times her other farm yard friends try to get her to stop. Eventually, the spiders web is complete and has caught its first fly! When it reaches night time and the spider is sound asleep, the owl is amazed by the beauty of the web. Throughout the story, the students can see and feel the web growing until it is complete. As a fun science activity, I would have a printable of a spider that comes with cutouts for the parts of the spider for the students to glue in their appropriate spots! This would be a fun way for the students to easily learn about spiders. Fun fact: there is only one place in the whole world where there are NO spiders! This book is on a 1.3 book level according to the Accelerated Reader book leveling system.

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review 2018-10-30 11:32
Sympathy for the Spider – Adrian Tchaikovsky‘s SPIDERLIGHT
Spiderlight - Adrian Tchaikovsky

A priest, a mage, a knight, a warrior, a thief, and a giant spider walk into a bar…

 

Tchaikovsky‘s Clarke Award-winning novel Children of Time (2015) already offered a fascinating glimpse into the arachnid mind – and went a long way to turn me from total arachnophobe into someone who still not really likes, but can at least appreciate spiders from afar. In Spiderlight (2016), the rare beast of a fantasy stand-alone novel, Tchaikovsky returns to eight-legged goodness. Not quite coincidentally, I read it in the same week Doctor Who brought us Spiders in the UK. I mean, what’s more fitting for Halloween than big, hairy, awfully fast spiders?

 

On first glance, Spiderlight is your typical D&D quest: the aforementioned assembly of rogues, warriors of the Light, follow a prophecy to bring down a Dark Lord. The prophecy leads them to Nth, the giant spider in question, who becomes their unwilling scout. Forcefully turned into a man, or at least into something vaguely resembling a man, he has to learn what it means to be human. The little band is guided by the Light of Armes, some bloke who went to become a god, dividing creation into creatures of the Light – humans – and creatures of the Dark – everyone else - with the Dark’s sole purpose being to be slain by the Light, because Light is better than Dark. Lovely fellow, this Armes, eh?

 

Tchaikovsky uses this set-up to thoroughly examine and subvert some of the more questionable fantasy tropes. On their journey into the Heart of Darkness our heroes reveal their motives and ever more of their personality - and don't appear all that heroic all of a sudden. Heart and soul of the narrative is Nth, whose abominable treatment poses a few uncomfortable questions about consent, about the means justifying an end, and puts a taint on all that Light.

Of course, subverting tropes has become a trope in itself by now, so the story’s not entirely new. But Tchaikovsky plays it well, tongue firmly in cheek, and with a palpable love for RPG. He manages to hold a fine balance between hilarious and gut-wrenchingly sad, light-hearted and heavy, Light and Dark… (sorry, couldn’t resist). The book’s a real page-turner, to boot. I finished it in just three days.

 

Recommended, even for people like me, who never quite got the fascination of D&D.

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review 2018-02-20 18:45
Zero Day by Ezekiel Boone
Zero Day: The Hatching Series, Book 3 (Hatching Series, The) - Ezekiel Boone

ZERO DAY was a fun wrap up to the trilogy that started with THE HATCHING.

 

The narrative is still following all the same people, people who are now facing the fallout from a few nuclear strikes across the U.S., and the previous ones which occurred in various places around the world. The spiders are still continuing to mutate and evolve with the most dangerous of them all appearing in this book.

 

I enjoyed following the characters around on each of their missions and adventures. What I did not like was the following, (do not click if you don't want to know): 

 where are the dead people? None of the main people die! I wish the story had more guts by sacrificing at least one of the main characters. Having them all live was just playing it too safe for my liking. Of course, I like it when everyone dies, so your mileage may vary.) I rarely felt anyone was in real danger.

(spoiler show)

 

Additionally, I wanted more spider action. In the previous two books, there was lots of it. They were both your usual quick chapter Creature Features with lots of spiders overcoming people, animals, etc... In this book there is little of that, other than during the denouement, which was disappointing.

 

As a whole, this series was a ton of fun! Even though I found this entry to be slightly wanting, the trilogy itself was a blast, with a couple of real twists that I enjoyed. And, I have to admit that at times, reading it made me itchy!

 

If Creature Features are your thing, then I highly recommend you check out this trilogy! I'd just advise you to have lots of lights on, so you can immediately spot any insects heading your way.

 

*Thanks to Atria and to NetGalley for the e-ARC of this book in exchange for my honest feedback. This is it.*

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review 2018-02-04 19:42
Charlotte's Web
Charlotte's Web - E.B. White,Garth Williams,Rosemary Wells

I can not say enough good things about this story. I read this book as a child, and have re-read it as an adult. The message still holds true! The text is so rich and filled with sensory details. I would love to do an entire novel study on this book. I would start by reading the chapters aloud to students. This would be a wonderful time to reflect on the language and have them turn and talk to discuss specific phrases. I would use this book in science lessons and study spiders! I would ask students to draw and label the parts of a spider. I would also extend this theme into writing. I would give the students several prompts while covering this text, such as: Would you like to have a pet pig? How did Charlotte save Wilbur's life? Choose an adjective that describes you; draw it in a web and write a paragraph explaining why you chose it. A fun way to end this unit would be to act out the story, or to watch the movie!

 

Guided Reading - R

Lexile - 680L

DRA - 40 

AR - 4.4

 

 

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