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text 2017-05-14 16:40
I got approved!
The Furthest Station - Ben Aaronovitch

So now I'm reading the series out of order.

 

Anyone know if I'm likely to trip over spoilers for the previous books?

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review 2017-05-11 08:00
The Furthest Station
The Furthest Station - Ben Aaronovitch

This was so much fun!

For years I've been a great fan of the series (I could rage for hours about how I always have to wait just shy of an entire year for the right edition to be published, but that is another case), so I was delighted when I got this review copy of The Furthest Station. It's only about 140 pages long, and it is not essential for the greater arc in the series, but fans will want to get a hold of it anyway.

Expect everything you've come to expect from Peter Grant and the rest of the crew. If you're new to the series, I greatly recommend starting with the first book in the series: Rivers of London.

Thanks to the publisher and Netgalley for providing me with a free copy of this book in exchange for an honest review!

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review 2017-04-26 04:18
Peter Grant ain't afraid of no ghost
The Furthest Station - Ben Aaronovitch

He asked if we were really ghost hunting, and I said we were.

 

“What, like officially?”

 

“Officially secret,” I said because discretion is supposed to be, if not our middle name, at least a nickname we occasionally answer to when we remember.


This novella hit the spot -- a short, but fully developed, adventure with our friends from the Rivers of London series -- full of action, a bit of snark, and seeing Peter in his element (and far out of it, too). Would I have preferred a full novel? Sure -- but if I can't have one, this is more than adequate.

 

Peter Grant, apprentice wizard and Police Constable, is investigating several reports of a ghost terrorizing people on the Underground during the morning commute. Naturally, even when interviewed immediately following a sighting the witness would only be able to remember details for a few moments before they forgot and/or rationalized them away. Which makes it pretty difficult to ask follow-up questions. As Peter continues to investigate, he ends up finding a very non-supernatural crime that he needs to deal with, even if he goes about it in a pretty supernatural way. While there's little in this series that I don't like, but Peter doing regular policework is one of my favorite parts.

Along for the ride (and looking for trouble) is his cousin, Abigail Jumara, acting as a summer intern for the Folly. Honestly, I barely remembered her when she shows up here -- but I eventually remembered her, and I was glad to see her back. I'm not necessarily sure that I need to see her all the time, but seeing more of her would definitely be pleasant.

 

In addition to the subplot about Abigail's future, there's a subplot revolving around another personification of a river -- not one of Mama Thames', either. I enjoyed it, and thought it fit in nicely with the rest of the novella, while giving us the requisite dose of a body of water.

 

There's not a lot to sink your teeth into here -- but the novella length doesn't leave you wanting more (like a short story would). It's good to see the Folly involved in smaller cases. Not just the serial killing, major magical threat, etc. kind of thing -- but the "smaller" stuff, too.

 

For any fan of the Folly/Peter Grant/Rivers of London series, this is one to get. It'd even make a pretty good introduction to the series for someone who hasn't yet discovered this fun UF series.


Disclaimer: I received this eARC from Subterranean Press via NetGalley in exchange for this post -- thanks to both, I needed something like this.
N.B.: As this was an ARC, any quotations above may be changed in the published work -- I will endeavor to verify them as soon as possible.

Source: irresponsiblereader.com/2017/04/25/the-furthest-station-by-ben-aaronovitch
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