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Search tags: the-guardian
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url 2017-05-16 20:26
44 new books in series today
Testimony - Scott Turow
World Without End (!Hero Trilogy) - Ross Lawhead,Mark Gilroy,Stephen R. Lawhead
Vanguard - Jack Campbell
Hospitality and Homicide (A Tourist Trap Mystery) - Lynn Cahoon
The Ultimatum (The Guardian Book 1) - Karen Robards
Raised in Fire (Fire and Ice Trilogy) (Volume 2) - K.F. Breene
Thick As Thieves - Megan Whalen Turner
Under Pressure - Alex Morgan

Highlighted a few in this post ; see http://www.fictfact.com/BookReleaseCalendar for the rest and the series info.

Source: www.fictfact.com/BookReleaseCalendar
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review 2017-05-12 14:53
No Bed for Bacon / Caryl Brahms & S.J. Simon
No Bed for Bacon - S.J. Simon,Caryl Brahms

Shakespeare's in love, perchance, in this rollicking send-up of the Age of Elizabeth. A very funny look at Elizabeth I, Will Shakespeare & the Elizabethan era which shows the Queen at her riotous best and the author unappreciated.

 

It’s a tribute to William Shakespeare that we are still interested in him, 400 years after his death. His life provides just the right mix of known facts and mysteries. We know the bare bones of his life—who he married, how many children he had, details of his career, and elements of his reputation.

What’s missing are the personal details—how did he feel about things? What kind of person was he to work with? What were his religious beliefs? Was he a faithful husband? Who was that Dark Lady of the sonnets, anyway? Did he really write all those things attributed to him?

This leaves authors lots of lee-way to write their own adventures for the Bard. I’ve enjoyed the likes of Shakespeare Undead and The Dark Lady's Mask, not to mention a short story involving Atticus O’Sullivan of Kevin Hearne’s Iron Druid series (Goddess at the Crossroads). Surprisingly, there doesn’t seem to be any kind of collated list of fiction featuring Shakespeare as a character, but No Bed for Bacon is the earliest that I have yet encountered. I’m surprised that there aren’t many more novels with Shakespeare figuring prominently as a character! If you know of any, please let me know in the comments, I’m intrigued to read more. There are tons of books written as reinterpretations of his works, but fewer which feature the Bard himself.

Despite being first published in 1941, No Bed for Bacon still feels remarkably fresh to me. Reputedly, it is the basis for the movie Shakespeare in Love.

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text 2017-05-11 22:17
Reading progress update: I've read 150 out of 256 pages.
No Bed for Bacon - S.J. Simon,Caryl Brahms

Okay, it's your turn No Bed for Bacon!  I will finish this evening or know the reason why!

 

However, I do have a massage scheduled (and I need it--my shoulders are so tight & sore) and I must make some rice krispie squares to take to Book Club tomorrow night.

 

Plus dealing with Mr. Cat.  Take one menopausal woman with sleep issues.  Add one cat that firmly believes that said woman should get up at 5:30 a.m. like his owner does.  Agitate.  Result?  Increased need & desire for coffee!

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review 2017-04-20 17:03
The Jerusalem Man and Atlantis – strange combination but quite good
The Last Guardian (Jon Shannow Novel) - David Gemmell

 

This is the second book in the Jon Shannow series by David Gemmell, having read the first one many years ago. It deals with his search for Jerusalem in a post-apocalyptic era and is basically a Western (gunfighters, outlaws etc..) with beasts, Atlanteans from the distant past and some hint about what happened to bring about the world in which they all live.

Although reasonably interesting, I found the novel a bit dated and even a bit silly at times. Having read quite a few of the author's fantasy books before, I was less impressed with this one.

 

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review 2017-04-13 22:39
Lord of the Flies / William Golding
Lord of the Flies - William Golding

Somehow, I missed this book during my school years. I remember seeing stacks of them in our school, but it was never assigned in one of my classes. I can see why it is a staple of high school curriculums, however, since it’s themes are easily seen and interpreted. There is plenty to discuss.
I would have appreciated it in high school, having struggled with Orwell’s Animal Farm instead. Lord of the Flies is pretty straight-forward in its depiction of the descent of supposedly civilized British boarding school boys into “savages” when left without adult supervision. Perhaps it is also a comment on boarding schools in general, which a couple of my friends have experienced (and do not recommend).

I find myself wondering how Golding would have written things differently if there were girls in the mix. Would they have been considered a “civilizing influence”? Or would they have become prizes or hostages in some boy’s competition? How did the “Little’uns” manage to escape the worst of the mistreatment that can be dished out when group dynamics go awry?

I chose this book after reading Barrie’s Peter Pan last year, wanting to contrast the “lost boys” in both novels. Unlike Barrie’s Lost Boys, the boys in LOTF have to grow up. Golding makes them struggle with adult responsibilities that they really aren’t prepared for, like keeping a signal fire going and building adequate shelters. I was also reminded of Robinson Crusoe, but his journey was actually towards religion, rather than away from it. Many years with only a Bible to read turns him into a religious man, which at the time would be considered more civilized.

A worthwhile book, but not one that I will ever likely re-read.

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