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review 2017-10-08 02:45
Nolite Te Bastardes Carborundorum
The Handmaid's Tale - Margaret Atwood

“Don't let the bastards grind you down.” 

 

 

The future fucking sucks. 

 

That's one of the lines from the promotional posters from The Handmaid's Tale on Hulu, and it's a good way to set the tone between the two works. While they both carry the same chilling version of a Dystopian (but still too close to home to be comfortable) future, the series has more of an aggressive tone, more of a willingness to bring it's evils down. The most noticeable of impact of that is June. Or, I should say, Offred. Because in the book, we never really learn Offred's true name, while in the series we receive it on the first episode.

 

They are different, but both of them are amazing interpretations. I recommend fans of the book to watch the show and fans of the show to read the book. I really loved both.

 

Back to our main character, Book Offred is very passive. Almost infuriatingly so, at times, until you remember she is simply a product of the extremely oppressive society that surrounds her. She has barely any fight left on her, because it was dragged away. And she is pale in comparison to other characters in the book, other man and other women, because Offred shows how deep the bleak world can cut someone who is simply normal (tv series Offred is tougher, because otherwise the series would be a little too slow for 10 chapters). 

 

“Better never means better for everyone... It always means worse, for some."

 

The Handmaid's Tale is a bone chilling book, a future where all minorities get permanently crushed under the boots of the ruling ones, but the true horror of the plot doesn't come on what's spoken. It comes on the chill horror of that which we never know. What happened to that one character? Where does the road lead, in the ending? We never know, and that's even more terrifying. Because our minds can take a hint. All we can conjure by our own is scarier than what the author could have told us.

 

This book is very topical. It was topical in 1985, and it's topical now. The true scary beings aren't the ones that are hidden under our beds, it's the very real ones that cross the street in front of us everyday. Not all humans are monsters, but all monsters are human.

 

The biggest character in the book isn't even our narrator. It's the unity. The unity of those that choose to fight against the power that holds them down, with very small gestures, or even bigger gestures. But still, they stand. It cannot end well. But it's better than no action at all.

 

 

“I want everything back, the way it was. But there is no point to it, this wanting.” 

 

 

Sentence: There isn't much I can say that hasn't been said before. But this is an amazing book, it's terrifying in the most subtle way, and it will jump at you when you're least expecting it. When it does... enjoy the ride.

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text 2017-09-26 05:41
Reading progress update: I've read 100 out of 136 pages.
The Handmaid's Tale - Margaret Atwood

I finished this one already but I'm still gathering my thoughts on it. Review soon!

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review 2017-08-16 00:00
The Handmaid's Tale
The Handmaid's Tale - Margaret Atwood It took me awhile to work up the nerve to read this book. I was worried that it would be too heavy on my heart. I'm glad I finally took the time. What happens in it is scary, but it's a great book. The way the story is written with the character like she is actually telling the reader the story makes it feel more personal. Mine was a recent copy so it also had a note from the author written after the tv series was already in the works. She answers frequently asked questions. It also has an essay type piece written by someone else discussing and explaining different bits. Both of those additions really helped me sort my thoughts. In the book, it's the future and America has become a land where women have no rights. All the equality we would expect is gone. Also, because of toxicity in the environment, lots of people can't have children anymore so the women that can are just used as breeders. Pretty freaky. Definitely worth reading.
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url 2017-07-22 00:31
The Seven Books Every Woman Must Read: Must-reads that have paved new roads, broken glass ceilings, and redefined female sexuality.
A Room of One's Own - Virginia Woolf
Fear of Flying - Erica Jong
Reading Lolita in Tehran - Azar Nafisi
The Book of Joan: Tales of Mirth, Mischief, and Manipulation - Melissa Rivers
#GIRLBOSS - Sophia Amoruso
Handmaid's Tale - Margaret Atwood
Lean In: Women, Work, and the Will to Lead - Sheryl Sandberg
Source: www.readitforward.com/bookshelf/the-seven
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text 2017-06-21 19:34
Top Read and Sold this week on Amazon.com (or: In my lifetime will the Harry Potter books ever not be chart toppers?)
The Handmaid's Tale - Margaret Atwood
Camino Island: A Novel - John Grisham
Beneath a Scarlet Sky: A Novel - Mark Sullivan
Come Sundown - Nora Roberts
American Gods - Neil Gaiman
The Subtle Art of Not Giving a F*ck: A Counterintuitive Approach to Living a Good Life - Mark Manson
I Can't Make This Up: Life Lessons - Kevin Hart,Neil Strauss
Al Franken, Giant of the Senate - Al Franken
Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind - Yuval Noah Harari Dr
Hillbilly Elegy: A Memoir of a Family and Culture in Crisis - J.D. Vance

I'm just noticing https://www.amazon.com/charts showing the current week's most read and most sold books.  I put the top five most read fiction and nonfiction at top of this post, visit the link for all of them. 

 

Anyone know what these colored triangles mean?  UPDATE — thanks to Grimlock's comment on another post — triangles refer to movement up/down on the chart.

 

         

 

 

Source: www.amazon.com/charts
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