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review 2017-12-16 01:06
Where's a Sherpa when you need one?
The Mysterious Benedict Society and the Perilous Journey - Diana Sudyka,Trenton Lee Stewart

When we first met the intrepid, orphaned quartet that made up a large part of the Mysterious Benedict Society we were left feeling that surely this couldn't be the last adventure that they'd be on together...and we were absolutely right. The whole gang is back in the second book in the series by Trenton Lee Stewart titled The Mysterious Benedict Society and the Perilous Journey. (Note: A new illustrator, Diana Sudyka, has penned the drawings for this book and forthcoming books in the series.) The beginning of the book starts off with the kids separated and trying to live as close to normal as possible. The reader is once again following the main character, Reynie, as he heads to meet up with everyone on the anniversary of their last adventure together. However, when they are all reunited at Mr. Benedict's house they are met with a very unpleasant surprise. (No spoilers here!!) What follows is a treacherous journey (hence the name of the book) that takes them on boats, trains, and up the side of a mountain in another country. While the central theme of friendship and working together is still present, this book is much darker in tone and a sense of foreboding lingers over every page. (In some ways, it reminds me of the progression of the Harry Potter series.) The illustrations again accompany a portion of the text and even though it's a different illustrator the sense of whimsy is ever-present. Overall, very enjoyable and fun to see how the author expands on each of the characters personalities and abilities. (Constance plays a much larger role in this book.) I have to confess that I've had the third book in the series gathering dust on my desk at work (and a copy of it here at home) but I haven't felt an overwhelming urge to pick it up just yet. I have a feeling this will be one of the first books I get to in the new year. XD If you read the first book in the series then I'm confident you'll enjoy the sequel. 8/10

 

 

A sample of the new illustrator's style [Source: Kinder Books]

 

 

What's Up Next: The Time Quartet series by Madeleine L'Engle

 

What I'm Currently Reading: Scythe by Neal Shusterman

 

Source: readingfortheheckofit.blogspot.com
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review 2016-09-12 00:00
The Perilous Journey of the Not-So-Innocuous Girl
The Perilous Journey of the Not-So-Innoc... The Perilous Journey of the Not-So-Innocuous Girl - Leigh Statham
The Good
+easy fun read
+hooked me from the get-go
+liked all the characters
+perspectives were spot-on
+loved the character growth
+didn't see the surprises coming


The Bad & The Other
-Halfway through Marguerite almost lost me with her antics
- Iroquois men seen as exotic man candy, which is problematic and not called out like the classism is.

Right away, I was pulled into the story. It was easy on the eyes and flowed beautifully. There’s plenty of refresher information so I didn’t feel like I missed anything. It was quite comfortable just jumping in. My luck paid off and the good feeling lasted.

Marguerite and Outil, the automaton, were a blast. Marguerite’s voice was spot on with her airs and perspective. She really is too spontaneous. I was cursing her stupid actions from the beginning, but wasn’t put off; I was cheering for her to get it right. It was only after numerous occasions of the same kind of stunts and her persistent privilege that it finally got to me.

I was about to say fuck this, but she turned it around right after. And I mean RIGHT AFTER I was tired of her antics. Then the threads came together, and she stepped up. I loved how she was authentically flawed from this standpoint at first and thankfully she progressed so it didn’t become a liability. It can be right but irritating to read and the line in the sand was drawn in the right spot.

Besides are troublesome heroine and her voice of reason, Jacques the love interest plays the biggest role. They have a push-pull flirty courting-but-not relationship. Marguerite is all about her independence, while Jacques is the “protecting you for your own good” gentleman.

I was on Marguerite’s side at first and then became frustrated how she kept sabotaging herself. She became a liability to where I had to admit the fools had a point about her. That’s, again, when she stepped up. I was so relieved! Then ~stuff~ was revealed that I didn’t see coming because I was wrapped up in her narrative. Now I’m like “Well, you both learned your lesson. You’ll be better next time. I look forward to it.”

There’s one other thing to mention though…Minor Spoilers Below:

Marguerite grows from her elitist views of other airwomen and lower class women in general. Which is fantastic. Really. (Though she doesn’t spare the same thought for lower-class men.) And I was quite pleased how she was corrected in regards to the Iroquois and legitimately changed.

“I am Iroquois, and my people are native to this land, but we are not native in the way you suggest.” His voice was proud and sharp.


She stopped calling them “natives” very quickly. What also happened was being attracted to the man like *that*. It was all animal lust tied into how different he was. She had to remind herself OF Jacques. It’s hard to pinpoint, but all their interactions felt…improper.

She wondered what her father, or any of the upper classes of France, would say if she walked into a ball with Otetiani on her arm. My, but he was handsome.


She started with the sheltered perspective of what white academics thought of the “natives” in books, and grew a tiny bit. And swooned. But they remained curiosities and fantasies to her using stereotypes of men of color. Which made me uncomfortable to say the least.

Plus, given I though Iroquois were matrilineal I was rather disappointed we only saw the men and that the men weren’t different living in a society like that. I mean, why flirt with the white girl that would have nothing in your society so you’d have nothing too? How would that even work? Would the women decide to accept her in or shun them both? Why is it automatically assume he’d move with her to her society and not the other way around?

Hmmmm….

Quotes:

Independence was nice, but so was luxury.


“I was up half the night thinking of all my hard work being thwarted by the men who claim to love me.”


She had much more important things to think about than getting along with common aerwomen.


She was much better with machines and gadgets than she was with everyday nonsense such as rope.



Bottomline:


Problematic 4 star read that was a light, quick, and fun read. If you like spontaneous women that grow as people, I highly recommend it. Unless you can’t stand sheltered, elitist snobs.
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review 2016-09-10 00:00
The Perilous Journey Of The Much Too Spontaneous Girl
The Perilous Journey Of The Much Too Spo... The Perilous Journey Of The Much Too Spontaneous Girl - Leigh Statham I signed up to review because I hadn’t read a fully enjoyable Gaslamp novel in a while and the blurb sounded great. I’d never heard of this program before so I was instantly curious.

Okay, all of this happened after the gorgeous cover caught me, but still, it counts.

What I didn’t count on was it being a sequel in a series. Oops. I ran out of time to read the first book and review it, so I read this first as a standalone. But that may have worked out for the best…

The Good
+easy fun read
+hooked me from the get-go
+liked all the characters
+perspectives were spot-on
+loved the character growth
+didn't see the surprises coming


The Bad & The Other
-Halfway through Marguerite almost lost me with her antics
- Iroquois men seen as exotic man candy, which is problematic and not called out like the classism is.




Right away, I was pulled into the story. It was easy on the eyes and flowed beautifully. There’s plenty of refresher information so I didn’t feel like I missed anything. It was quite comfortable just jumping in. My luck paid off and the good feeling lasted.

Marguerite and Outil, the automaton, were a blast. Marguerite’s voice was spot on with her airs and perspective. She really is too spontaneous. I was cursing her stupid actions from the beginning, but wasn’t put off; I was cheering for her to get it right. It was only after numerous occasions of the same kind of stunts and her persistent privilege that it finally got to me.

I was about to say fuck this, but she turned it around right after. And I mean RIGHT AFTER I was tired of her antics. Then the threads came together, and she stepped up. I loved how she was authentically flawed from this standpoint at first and thankfully she progressed so it didn’t become a liability. It can be right but irritating to read and the line in the sand was drawn in the right spot.

Besides are troublesome heroine and her voice of reason, Jacques the love interest plays the biggest role. They have a push-pull flirty courting-but-not relationship. Marguerite is all about her independence, while Jacques is the “protecting you for your own good” gentleman.

I was on Marguerite’s side at first and then became frustrated how she kept sabotaging herself. She became a liability to where I had to admit the fools had a point about her. That’s, again, when she stepped up. I was so relieved! Then ~stuff~ was revealed that I didn’t see coming because I was wrapped up in her narrative. Now I’m like “Well, you both learned your lesson. You’ll be better next time. I look forward to it.”

There’s one other thing to mention though…Minor Spoilers Below:

Marguerite grows from her elitist views of other airwomen and lower class women in general. Which is fantastic. Really. (Though she doesn’t spare the same thought for lower-class men.) And I was quite pleased how she was corrected in regards to the Iroquois and legitimately changed.

“I am Iroquois, and my people are native to this land, but we are not native in the way you suggest.” His voice was proud and sharp.

She stopped calling them “natives” very quickly. What also happened was being attracted to the man like *that*. It was all animal lust tied into how different he was. She had to remind herself OF Jacques. It’s hard to pinpoint, but all their interactions felt…improper.

She wondered what her father, or any of the upper classes of France, would say if she walked into a ball with Otetiani on her arm. My, but he was handsome.

She started with the sheltered perspective of what white academics thought of the “natives” in books, and grew a tiny bit. And swooned. But they remained curiosities and fantasies to her using stereotypes of men of color. Which made me uncomfortable to say the least.

Plus, given I though Iroquois were matrilineal I was rather disappointed we only saw the men and that the men weren’t different living in a society like that. I mean, why flirt with the white girl that would have nothing in your society so you’d have nothing too? How would that even work? Would the women decide to accept her in or shun them both? Why is it automatically assume he’d move with her to her society and not the other way around?

Hmmmm….
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review 2015-03-19 18:09
Review: The Perilous Journey of the not-so-Innocuous Girl by Leigh Statham
The Perilous Journey of the Not-So-Innoc... The Perilous Journey of the Not-So-Innocuous Girl - Leigh Statham

I received this book from the author in exchange for an honest review

 

Steampunk, adventure, romance-- all can be found in The Perilous Journey of the not-so-Innocuous Girl.This is one of those rare novels that blends a fun plot with great characters, making for a wonderful read. I was entirely too grumpy when forced to put it down, and yes- I did read it in just a few hours.

 

Marguerite- what can I say about her? She was the type of female protag I love: smart, too sassy for her own good, and courageous. Marguerite knew she wouldn't be happy with the life being forced upon her. It takes great courage to take a chance on a new life- even if she did do it originally to be with Claude. No one could ever accuse her of taking the easy way out of anything. I liked Claude, he seemed like a great childhood friend, but there were no sparks between the two characters. Now Jacques, on the other hand, seemed to set Marguerite's heart racing-- both in outrage and attraction.

 

I loved the steampunk aspect of this novel-- so many fun inventions, bots, machines-- and everything was described in such a way that it was easy to picture in the minds eye. The story unfolded at a great pace, in fact there was only one lull that occurred toward the middle when Marguerite first boarded the aership. There wasn't a whole lot of romance in the story, but what was there was rather sweet. Lots of action- did I mention that Marguerite was a woman of action. As the book progressed I became more and more impressed with her.

 

The Perilous Journey of the not-so-Innocuous Girl is great for fans of nonstop action and adventure. Vivid imagery, great characters, and a fun plot made it one of the better books I've read this year.

Source: onceuponayabook.blogspot.com/2015/03/the-perilous-journey-of-not-so.html
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