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review 2018-12-08 12:00
funtastic insights into the real Scotland
Abenteuer Highlands - Mein etwas anderes Leben im schottischen Hochland - Nellie Merthe Erkenbach

Reading this has been so much fun so in case you do speak German - go and get Erkenbach's "Abenteuer Highlands".

The author, a famous and well travelled tv journalist, ends up in the remote Scottish Highlands with a man she rarely knows.

All these little everyday adverntures she has to "survive" out there in the beautiful wilderness of Europe's far North, her thoughts filled with humour and wisdom.

And yes, she falls in love with the guy and they get together but the adventures seem to be as amuseing as they are neverending. 
Her stories vary considerably, from historical murders to funny neighbours, extraordinary customs and hilarious mishaps like the lost pants on the bike - I will not give too much away. Just read it and be happy.

Five stars from me MS Erkenbach!

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review 2018-12-08 04:12
I Will Never Leave Thee Nor Forsake Thee
Woman of Courage: Collector's Edition Continues the Story of Little Fawn - Wanda E. Brunstetter

“I am a woman of faith who is trusting in the Lord to give her courage.”

“Woman of Courage” has been on my reading list for a few years now, and I am glad that I was able to read this collector’s edition, which includes the sequel novella “Woman of Hope.” Expecting “Woman of Courage” to be a travel novel and an Oregon Trail-like experience, I was surprised to discover that it fell more into the genre of wilderness survival and mountain living. Traveling was still a part of the tale, but most of the narrative was focused on the characters’ experiences and interactions with each other rather than on the trek itself. Fraught with omnipresent danger, this story did not have any lulls or tedious sections and proved to be a quick read, even taking into consideration the appended novella. The situations seemed realistic and not contrived, and there were several twists that I did not expect, which I always appreciate. Amanda, the eponymous heroine, was a sweet character, and I would have liked to have more of her background; other than being unerringly Christian and using quaint language (“thee” and “thou”), there were no other indications that she was a Quaker. It would have been worthwhile to add more information about this particular religious group to the story, in my opinion. However, I did appreciate the author’s use of Native American and mixed-race characters.

Despite very much enjoying this story, there were a few points with which I had issues, and I wavered between a four and a five-star rating. Some of the language and slang used in the narrative was not period-appropriate, and several of the characters were stereotypical, including Amanda. She was too perfect and therefore did not seem to grow or change throughout the course of the story, whereas Jim Breck’s attitudes and place in the story shifted too quickly. Yellow Bird and Buck McFadden were my favorite characters, as they were the most dynamic and realistic, given their pasts and what became of them. Because Amanda was a missionary, the Christian underpinning of the novel did come across as preachy, but not overbearingly so. Amanda’s story dovetailed well into that of Little Fawn’s in “Woman of Hope”, and this novella is what ultimately bumped up my rating. Little Fawn’s story was not as idealistic and yet it was still hopeful and inspiring. Amanda’s character was also more realistic, and all of the characters’ actions were credible. The story was well written for its short length, as well, and it did not seem like it was too abrupt. Being able to see how circumstances changed for the characters from “Woman of Courage” in the approximately seventeen-year time gap and being introduced to the next generation of characters was a fitting way to end the saga.

I received a complimentary copy of this book from Barbour Publishing and was under no obligation to post a review.

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text 2018-12-03 03:55
Reading progress update: I've read 2 out of 172 pages.
Maigret and the Tall Woman - Georges Simenon,Georges Simeon,David Watson

my Reading Project for 2019 may end up being a whole lot of Simenon novels; My Friend MaigretA Maigret Christmas and Other Stories, and The Man Who Watched The Trains Go By have convinced me this could be a great idea. we’ll see how I feel after this one...

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review 2018-11-30 22:38
Catch Tapeworms: "The Woman in White" by Wilkie Collins
The Woman in White - Wilkie Collins,Matthew Sweet



(Original Review, 1981-01-25)



Beauty is completely subjective, and in Victorian times when this novel was written, the ideal of beauty was extremely different to what we would consider attractive now. Blond, blue eyed, curly hair and very pale was considered lovely. Women went to incredible lengths to achieve the paleness - even deliberately trying to catch consumption or tapeworms as that would help achieve the extreme paleness, weakness and general lying on the sofa because you are too pathetic to do anything else look. This is not a general look that is found attractive nowadays. Then, just simply having dark hair / eyes was enough to be considered 'ugly'.

 

 

If you're into stuff like this, you can read the full review.

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review 2018-11-28 03:06
THE LIBRARY ON The EDGE OF THE WORLD by Felicity Hayes McCoy
The Library at the Edge of the World - Felicity Hayes-McCoy
 

 

 THE LIBRARY ON THE EDGE OF THE WORLD

 Felicity Hayes-McCoy

paperback, 368 pages

Published November 14th 2017 by Harper Perennial
ISBN:  0062663720 (ISBN13: 9780062663726)

 

 

 

 

 

Things start a quiet confusion while Hannah tries to figure out her life after divorce and moving back to her small, rural hometown. Then chaos when she starts renovations on her house and the community finds out they are losing governmental support for the library and seniors.
I am a library lover to begin with. Set that in Ireland, I am in heaven. This was a fun read. Some of the crotchety characters and the description of the landscape were great. Hayes-McCoy usually writes non-fiction about the Dingle Peninsula where this book is set, so she knows the area well. Her words bring out the beauty of the area wonderfully. Hannah's character was a little too stubborn for me, at first. But as I continued with the story, I soon realized why.

 

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