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review 2018-01-27 10:07
The Bee Friendly Garden: Easy Ways to Help the Bees and Make Your Garden Grow
The Bee Friendly Garden: Easy Ways to Help the Bees and Make Your Garden Grow - Doug Purdie

I think I mentioned in a post just after Christmas that MT got me bees for Christmas.  An old schoolmate of his runs a beehive management business, and either Tuesday or Wednesday next week, after dark, he's delivering our hives to us.  MT has decreed that all the bees will be named Barry.  I've pointed out that all the worker bees are female, which temporarily stumped him.  I'm sure by the time I finish this review he'll have rallied.  Stay tuned.

 

Anyway, my garden is pretty close to jungle status as is, but I'm always looking for excuses to plant new things, and our bees need to feel welcomed.  But I know not all flowers are bee friendly (size, shape, and whether or not they make pollen/nectar), so I wanted a list of particular plants the bees would love.  Our bee guy recommended this book, and MT bought it for me for my birthday, and I guilted him into giving it to me a day early, because he also gave me this cold.

 

The Bee guy did not steer me wrong.  This is a great book for anyone who just wants to attract more bees to their garden.  It's a tiny bit preachy - he's (rightfully) passionate about NOT spraying your garden - but there's a lot of compelling reason to preach it.  Without bees we can kiss about 80% of our food goodbye and bees are in serious decline world wide.  

 

The Bee Friendly Garden is strongly geared toward Australia, primarily in the chapters where he discusses native bees (some of which are SO cool), but more than half the book would be useful to anyone, as a lot of the suggestions are geared toward the European honey bee and the plant lists are almost universal in their availability.

 

I now have a list of plants to look for at the nursery.  Now I just have to find a place to put them.  

 

Update:  MT has named all the bees Betty.

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review 2017-10-31 00:00
Why I'm Afraid of Bees (Goosebumps, #17)
Why I'm Afraid of Bees (Goosebumps, #17) - R.L. Stine I'm pretty sure I read this one a loooong time ago, but it didn't stick in my head. I don't think it will this time around, either. Definitely not my favorite Goosebumps book and I had a hard time getting through it. It wasn't awful or anything, though, just not one of the really good ones in my opinion.
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review 2017-08-14 00:00
The Language of Bees
The Language of Bees - Laurie R. King Excellent mystery, this one set in 1920s Britain including Scotland/Orkneys. Warning: seems to be a two-parter; I'm not certain, but you'll probably want to pick up the next in the series to start immediately after, as there is an awfully strong hint at the conclusion that a major thread continues to the next volume. Looking forward to it!
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review 2017-08-05 00:00
The History of Bees
The History of Bees - Maja Lunde,Diane Oatley Let see it as a coincidence: a big egg insecticide scandal in Germany that has spread to food stores across Europe, "emissionsgate", Trump's energy policy and me, reading [b:The History of Bees|32920292|The History of Bees|Maja Lunde|https://images.gr-assets.com/books/1485795323s/32920292.jpg|45708705]. Actually I can add many other scandals to this list, those that are happening because of our reckless behavior or indifferent attitude to flora and fauna, those that lead to damage which can never be made good.

The History of Bees is a book about bees. One could guess. It is Well not really. But it is so clever framed, so beautifully told that it is impossible not TO think about what will we leave to our future generation.

We follow the stories of three different families living in three different periods of time: in the past, in the present and in the future. Three different fates, three different lives, three different places, three different social backgrounds. cultures, mentality. There is a connection between all these fates, but which one? It couldn't be only bees, it has to be more.

You won't get the answer up to the end. Truly clever solved. I had many theories and partly I was right, but still I had a WOW-moment waiting for me.

What I really enjoyed, along with a melancholically beautiful way of telling, an enthralling story with an unusual building and interesting characters was a strong feeling of hope.
A single, unifying feeling: hope. And this is a good thing.

Very recommended.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M8OksU9G9WA&feature=youtu.be

***Copy provided kindly by the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review***
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review 2017-07-20 09:10
Zoom: How Everything Moves by Bob Berman
Zoom: From Atoms and Galaxies to Blizzards and Bees: How Everything Moves - Bob Berman

TITLE:  Zoom:  How Everything Moves,  From Atoms and Galaxies to Blizzards and Bees

 

AUTHOR:  Bob Berman

 

DATE OF PUBLICATION:  2014

 

FORMAT:  Paperback

 

ISBN-13:  978-1-78074-549-7

 

_________________

 

REVIEW:  

 

In this "pop-science" book, Bob Berman takes a whirl-wind tour around the many phenomena that have to do with motion.  He includes interesting stories that span astronomy, geology, biology, meteorology and history.  Everything from the exploding universe, runaway poles, magnetic fields, radiation, atoms, snow, ice, tides, tsunami, how clouds stay aloft, earth;s motion, in-tune mosquitoes, wind, air pressure, lightning, thunder, meteors, electricity, sneezes, animals, cells, and much more.

 

The author explains each phenomenon in an enthusiastic, clear and understandable manner, without bogging the reader down with complicated science. Bob Berman provides a new perspective on old "stuff" and also covers topics not usually covered in popular physics books.  Each chapter covers something different, so the reader can dip in and out without getting confused.  This book was a joy to read.

 

 

 

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