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review 2018-08-15 02:03
ARC Review: Camwolf by JL Merrow
Camwolf - J.L. Merrow

This was an interesting take on the shapeshifter sub-genre, and a much darker tale than what I'm used to from this author.

Dr. Nick Sewell is a professor at Cambridge university. He's also a werewolf, bitten and turned by an ex-boyfriend, and still struggling a bit with the wolfy parts of him.

Julian, a new student from Germany, causes an immediate reaction in Nick, even more so when Nick realizes the younger man is also a wolf. Nick is all alpha-wolf, which works well since Julian is more submissive in nature. 

Nick is still angry with the ex-boyfriend - he didn't ask to be bitten and turned, and the ex disappeared on him, more or less, so Nick has had to figure out pretty much on his own how to deal with the pull of the moon and the change. And now he's all growly and jealous and finds that he has this urge to be near the new student as much as possible, even though that creeps him out and he knows he sticks out like a sore thumb. 

Julian's backstory comes out slowly, and there were moments when what I found out made me so. fucking. mad! 

The author did a fine job with her characters - both are complex and flawed, polar opposites at first glance, but in many instances more alike deep down than they realize. The book is told from Nick's POV, switching with Julian's friend Tiffany's POV, which I found unusual and somewhat unfitting, since I really didn't have much interest in Tiffany, but the more I thought about her narrative, the more I realized that she actually brought some depth to Julian's character that may not have been as clear if we'd only heard from Nick. 

The thing that bothered me the most was how the situation with Julian's father's Beta turned out - and how his father seemed unapologetic for what he put his child through. Julian's mother seemed very weak, but we only saw her through Nick's eyes, and those were a bit biased. What didn't help was that there was a distinct lack of world-building - the werewolf lore used wasn't really explained, for one, and while Nick learns a bit more about changing into a wolf, he didn't really delve any deeper than what Julian told him. 

And it raised additional questions - like, is Crack fully human? And will he get his own book?

It's a rather dark novel, much darker than I expected, but I enjoyed reading it. I am German by birth, and most of the German used in this book was accurate. A few things were, while spelled properly, not exactly how a German would express themselves (at least not one from where I grew up).


** I received a free copy of this book from its publisher in exchange for an honest review. **

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review SPOILER ALERT! 2018-08-14 21:33
Book review : the king of bourbon street thea de salle
The King of Bourbon Street - Thea de Salle

July 19-23


Hotel chain mogul Sol DuMont is about to learn that some of life’s biggest surprises come in deceptively small packages—namely a petite heiress named Rain who’s hell-bent on upsetting her family’s expectations—in this first book in the all new series by Thea de Salle, set against the sultry backdrop of New Orleans.

Thirty-seven-year-old Sol DuMont is a divorcee and the owner of a mid-sized hotel chain in New Orleans. Since Hurricane Katrina, his father’s death, and the decision that he and his ex-wife Maddy are far better off friends than lovers, he’s lost interest in almost everything he held dear—parties, people, and pushing limits.

All his limits.

Then Arianna Barrington checks into his hotel.

Twenty-four-year-old Arianna “Rain” Barrington could have been society’s sweetheart. Her family is moneyed, connected press darlings, and make sweeping headlines from coast to coast for reasons both good and bad. But when her mother shoves her at Charles Harwood—the obnoxious, entitled heir of Harwood Corp—to cement a billion-dollar business merger, Rain does the only thing she can think of to escape: she creates a scandal so big Harwood doesn’t want her anymore before fleeing to New Orleans for much-needed rest and relaxation.

All she wants is jazz piano, beignets, and to sail the Mississippi. What she gets is Sol DuMont, a whirlwind affair, and a hands-on education in sex, power play, and pushing limits.

All her limits. 


Review : I freaking love this book it was cute and sexy and body positive . Rain goes to new Orleans for a vacation after a scandal about her and a sex tape so her and her brother go to a hotel and there she meets sol who i love he is the owner of the hotel he's a dom and bisexual he and rain strike up a relationship and I love them together the only problem is rains crazy ass mother who is trying to ruin sol hotel .so rain goes to Connecticut to do an interview threatening to do a tell all book about her mother her mom tells her not to and rain says she won't if she leaves her and sol alone . She goes back to sol. I can't wait to read the rest of the series


Quotes :


of course I’d pick the girl with an ex-marine for a chaperone


Sol almost pointed out that Vaughan couldn’t smoke the cigarette in the hotel, but he liked his face and so far this had been an amicable exchange.



Sol DuMont seemed heaven-sent. He was handsome and funny and sexy and sweet, which meant, by some cosmic joke, he probably had dead bodies stored in The Seaside’s freezer. Or maybe he sniffed socks when no one was looking. Or maybe he had a back-hair fetish.


Kitten.” “Yes?” “Are you trying to seduce me?” “Maybe? Is it working?” “Fantastically

 

 

 

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text 2018-08-14 17:55
Reading progress update: I've read 14%. - feeling disoriented
Our Friends In Berlin - Anthony Quinn

Competent if slightly disorienting start to an unusual idea: a spy novel set in London during the Blitz where the German spies are the heroes.

 

I'm not sure where this is going but the ever-so-English almost "Mrs Minerva" atmosphere is made oxymoronic when applied to descriptions of "Little England" fifth columnists meeting discuss how to accelerate Hitler's liberation of Europe.

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review 2018-08-14 16:12
Review: Wild Hunger (Heirs of Chicagoland #1) by Chloe Neill
Wild Hunger - Chloe Neill

 

As the only vampire child ever born, some believed Elisa Sullivan had all the luck. But the magic that helped bring her into the world left her with a dark secret. Shifter Connor Keene, the only son of North American Central Pack Apex Gabriel Keene, is the only one she trusts with it. But she’s a vampire and the daughter of a Master and a Sentinel, and he’s prince of the Pack and its future king.

When the assassination of an ambassador brings old feuds to the fore again, Elisa and Connor must choose between love and family, between honor and obligation, before Chicago disappears forever.

 

*I received a free copy from the publisher and chose to leave a voluntary review. Thank you!*

 

4 ½ ★

I have read and loved The Chicagoland Vampires Series, (mostly) so when I saw this will be released I was really psyched to get my hands on it. I should say that it also can be easily read if you have not read the first series, everything that is important will be mentioned and explained. So if you have not read it and don’t plan on it you still can read this book and not be lost. After reading it I can say that I enjoyed it more than I thought I would. It was a perfect mix of old and new , the old Chicagoland we know and love and the new with fresh new people to love just as much if not a bit more . Familiar faces and storyline being brought over to the new faces and new problems with Chicago. We still get to see Merit and Ethan but out if the eyes of their Daughter Elisa which I not only liked but it was different. But obviously this being Elisa’s story they stay pretty much in the background but still poke their head in sometimes. Which was nicely done. I really enjoyed Elisa, she was strong, unique funny and really working on distancing herself from her parent’s legacy and wants to stay on her own two feet. But what nobody knows is that she fights an internal battle with a monster inside her since she was pretty much born. A possible side effect if the way she was made and or born?! Only one person knows a little about it and that is Connor Keene. Speaking of Connor I really enjoyed him, sexy strong alpha male with a sense of humor. I really loved them together and their banter, it had many laugh out loud moments. But there was also a tender and really honest site to them that I loved. Overall I just really liked them. The few awkward moments between them made it just so much more realistic and fun read. I also enjoyed Theo, thought his role in the Ombidubus office was great, I just hope we will not see a love triangle here. I also enjoyed Lulu, the daughter of Malory and Catcher who decided to ban Magic in her life, but I think that will change and we will see some kind of conflict with herself. Of course we also see the faeries again and of course they up to no good. We learn more about their magic and history but also more about Magic in general that also involves the vampires and wolves. The seen prophecy we heard about before is hinted at but we still don’t know what it is or what was seen……but I think it will be a major part of the series. Overall, I really enjoyed it was fresh and funny, the writing was smooth and it was easy to fall in love with the characters. The final battle I thought was a bit anti climatic but overall it was great first book and I ‘m looking forward to reading the next one already.

I rate it 4 ½ ★

 

 

 

 

 

 

Buy Links 

Amazon ***  B&N *** Kobo 

 

Source: snoopydoosbookreviews.com/index.php/2018/08/14/review-wild-hunger-heirs-of-chicagoland-1-by-chloe-neill
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review 2018-08-14 12:48
"Bearskin" by James A. McLaughlin - Highly Recommended
Bearskin - James McLaughlin

"Bearskin" is a rare find: a literary thriller that is as lyrical as it is muscular.

 

Instead of choosing between writing a literary book about how a man can surrender himself to the dark sentience of an ancient forest and walk out more himself than he was before or a thriller about a man deeply maimed by violence who, although living an almost invisible life in the wilds, knows his past will catch up with him, James McLaughlinhas written a book that is both a literary achievement and a page-turning, viscerally realistic thriller.

 

Two things caught and kept my attention throughout this book: the development of Rice Moore, the man at the heart of the story and the sometimes total immersion into the ancient Appalachian forest. Either one would have been reason enough to read this book. Together they became compelling.

 

Rice Moore is a great creation. Recent acts of extreme violence against him and by him have left him emotionally scarred and subject to fugues states and hallucinations. A solitary man who no longer entirely trusts himself to play well with others, he seeks isolation, partly to hide from his enemies and partly to avoid people. Alone in the forest, feeling its pulse next to his own, his inability to let go of his territoriality or his instinct for violence, repeatedly draws him into conflict with the people around him.

 

Yet this isn't a one-man-triumphs-against-the-world sort of story. Moore is losing his mind. His fugue states, his obsession with protecting the black bears on the estate he is warden of and his personal ghosts, lead him down a path where he literally puts on another skin and enters a different kind of consciousness. James McLaughlin's ability to help me experience this altering of states as something real and raw was deeply impressive.

 

Even though "Bearskin" is as fast-paced and propulsive as a thriller needs to be, McLaughlin is able to incorporate the forest and its fauna and fauna as a deeply experienced part of the story. Ecology is more than a plot device or a scientific concept here, it is about understanding our place in the world and its rhythms.

 

In addition to these two strong themes, McLaughlin gives us an insight into the poaching of black bears, the vengeance of the Mexican drug cartels and the rules and rituals of outlaw motorcycle clubs and an up-close experience of violence that is hard to look away from.

 

I recommend the audiobook version of "Bearskin" as MacLeod Andrews' narration enhanced my experience of the book.

 

Click on the SoundCloud link below to hear a sample.

 

[soundcloud url="https://api.soundcloud.com/tracks/441607044" params="color=#ff5500&auto_play=false&hide_related=false&show_comments=true&show_user=true&show_reposts=false&show_teaser=true&visual=true" width="100%" height="300" iframe="true" /]

 

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