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review 2017-04-20 11:53
A Slightly Feminist Installment in Project Frankenstein in the form of My Frankenstein by Michael J. Lee.
My Frankenstein - Frauke Spanuth,Michael J. Lee

 

 

 

So far, I've read about Frankenstein's twin brother whom he tried to save but couldn't, which lead to the events of the original version.

 

I have also come across his twin daughters, one of whom was curious enough to continue with his work.

 

And, this last book that I read mentioned him to be a champion of Industrial Revolution, trying to force a small town into the modern world.

 

What is evident in the Frankenstein family tree is there is a dark thread running through it, which appears in all its members!

 

What I Liked About My Frankenstein

 

The refreshing way Frankenstein acted to Eva's intelligence. It didn't matter to him if she was a girl. What made her beautiful to him was her mind. In fact, there was one scene where he sees Eva and her very beautiful friend together. Even then, Eva's beauty calls out to him while the friend he dismisses as an Amazon. That isn't to say that Amazons weren't awesomesauce. It is simply how Victor thinks because to him, brute strength is for mentally inferior people.

 

The "monster", Adam, is as innocent as the original monster. He also retained the stubborn nature and had a way with words. All of it kept the true spirit of the original alive.

 

Some of the words that stood out to me:

 

It's in that moment you discover that you never really cared about benefiting mankind. What you did, you did for yourself. To stand on the mountaintop and look down on mankind. The mortal sin of pride.

 

These words were spoken by Igor who assisted Victor in his quest and later came to regret it.

 

Maybe I feel nothing because I am nothing. Or am I nothing because I feel nothing?

 

Spoken by Adam, these words made me sad. They stem from all the brainwashing that Victor had done on the poor creature, even going as far as to tell him he wasn't even a thing, let alone a man!

 

What I didn't Like About My Frankenstein

 

There wasn't any depth to the story. I don't know why it felt that way to me. It could be the sequence of events, which wasn't surprising at all. It could also be how Eva behaved towards Frankenstein, which was again no surprise. It might be the ending as well, which doesn't fit in with the rest of the novel.

 

So, this is how the project stands now

 

 

 

I'm now reading, Undead and Unworthy, by MaryJanice Davidson.

 

 

Undead & Unworthy is a part of the Undead series, which is a whole lot of fun. Give it a try, if you like Vampire Queens who have a killer sense of fashion and not much brains! I still love how she deals with being easily distracted and doesn't let it stop her from doing the right thing. It awes me that people constantly underestimate her and yet she just does her thing.

 

 

Because Tor has a re-read going on and I've been meaning to read it for a long time:

 

 

I will end this post with a Frankenstein joke:

 

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text 2017-04-17 12:39
Frankenstein - Mary Shelley,Maurice Hindle

Mary shelley is a renowned author and is appreciated for her works.The novel is a slow burner and the moments of horror with scarce deaths are presented so quick that one cant even develop the moments of proper emotions on them.I didnt enjoy the book much but one cant deny the prestigious position this book has in the history of literature and its impact on millions of readers.

a 2.5 ✴ book.

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text 2017-04-16 14:17
The Status of Project Frankenstein & Other Updates

 

 

 

 

Reading Goal

 

I have completed half of the goal that I set for myself this year. Really happy that I'm getting some reading done even with life being as crazy as it is.

 

 

 

Project Frankenstein

 

I have finished 8 out of the books that I originally included in the post. Right now, I'm reading My Frankenstein, which is fun. Frankenstein & Philosophy remains abandoned even now. It isn't just dry; it is also repetitive, which makes it even worse!

 

 

  1. Parent Material: Frankenstein by Mary Shelley
  2. Others’ Take: The Mammoth Book of Frankenstein by Stephen Jones
  3. Historical Retakes: Anno Frankenstein by Jonathan Green
  4. Genre Spins: Steampunk: Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein by Zdenko Basic
  5. Young Adult Forays: Dr. Frankenstein’s Daughters by Suzanne Weyn
  6. Sci-Fi Pastiche: Prodigal Son by Dean Koontz
  7. Philosophical Entree: Frankenstein and Philosophy by Nicholas Michaud
  8. Series Picker-Uppers: The Second Birth of Frankenstein by Will Hill
  9. Prequels: This Dark Endeavor by Kenneth Oppel
  10. Precipitating Conditions: The Lady and Her Monsters by Roseanne Montillo
  11. Character Spotlight: My Frankenstein by Michael J. Lee
  12. Technological Difficulties: Frankenstein’s Cat by Emily Anthes
  13. Changed Perspectives: Frankenstein’s Monster by Susan Heyboer O’Keefe
  14. Graphic Detail: Monster Of Frankenstein by Dick Briefer, David Jacobs, Alicia Jo Rabins Edwards

 

Book Bingo

 

 

Besides this, I am also playing Book Bingo with my workmates. At the moment, I'm reading a book for the Myth-Based shelf

 

 

 

this is the progress that I've made so far:

 

 

 

 

 

Wringo Ink.


 

 

As you guys know, we started a Writing Bingo game at work, as well. So far, I've written a short story in the Romance genre, one with a Philosophical twist, and a play! Now, I'm writing a story that starts with a certain phrase. The phrase was chosen by our long-suffering readers and goes like, "Once upon a time, sharks flew across the sky."

 

 

 

 

Booklikesopoly

 

As if I don't have enough things going, I am so tempted to start this game. If I do, I think I'll let it extend beyond May 2017 because I want to finish as many books off my TBR as I can! I have already rolled the dice for the first time and got 7 viz.

 

 

and I'm thinking of reading this one because I haven't had a chance to read it yet:

 

 

 

Five Exercises for Writing Stronger Narrative Personality

 

I think I'll be starting with this one and take my time to finish writing about each personality:

 

Exercise 1: Free Write

 

"Take three personalities, and spend fifteen minutes free writing in their voice. You can write about absolutely anything – what you ate for breakfast, which elder god will swallow the world, or what the character’s life is like – as long as you do it with their personality".

 

I want to start with, A cultist on the edge of losing their soul to an elder god,
because it sounds very Malazan-esque and really cool!

 

 

The Missing Slate Contest

 

A short story content that I will be participating in. Here are the details:

 

 

 

 

The Salam Award for Imaginative Fiction

 

The daddy of all awards and I want to participate in this one. The deadline is mid of May and I kept thinking I had time but now April's almost gone and I'm panicking. I have the beginnings of an idea but I don't yet know how to pull it off. Moreover, the idea tells me that the story is going to be Military SciFi/Fantasy. I might have read books in this genre but writing a story seems impossible.

 

 

Stick along for the ride & I promise, I'll keep you posted!

 

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review SPOILER ALERT! 2017-03-30 08:07
March 2017 — Wrap-Up

 

 

 
 
 

Old Favorites

 

DU

 

Dune (Re-Read)

I’ve covered this book in too much detail to add anything here. Well okay, I’ll just leave this joke here:
 
Check out the final review instalment here.

 

New Delights

 

 

CO.jpg

 

Coraline

Coraline is a book that I would have loved to read as a kid. It is full of Dahl-esque quirkiness…okay, who am I kidding? I loved it even as an adult! Two of my favorite quotes:
 
1
 
2
 
 

BI.jpg

 

Binti

Read my detailed review here.
 

 
1.jpg
 
 
I dunno what to say about this book, except that it had nothing and everything in it! I wanted to pick it up as soon as I got off work and I didn’t want to put it down. The plot is simple and straightforward. The author hasn’t weighed it down with complicated science. You can see where the events are leading up to and yet… I am still ambivalent about the ending but I guess, I’ll just let it sink in for a bit before I come to a decision. This was my first Simak book and I can’t wait to gobble everything else by him!
 
 
P.S. The cover has NOTHING to do with what goes on in the book. 
 
 

Holocaust Horrors

 

TCM

 

The Complete Maus

This comic will just mess you up and yet, you’d be unable to put it down. Just look at how beautifully it portrays the impact of the dreadful event on not just the parents who experienced it but also on their kids who had to live with it:
 
 
1
 
 
 

 

New Additions to Old Favorites

 

S5.jpg

 

Saga Vol.5.

 
Saga continues to be its beautiful, painful self. I’ve stopped thinking that the story is going anywhere. I just read it because I can’t not read it! Some of the artwork:
 

 

 

MWT.jpg

 

More Weird Customers Say in Bookshops

 
The first one was wayyyyy funnier.
 
 
 
 

New but Okayish

 

LK.jpg

 

The Lady Killer

Beautifully drawn but lacks anything that’d make it stand out!  I don’t think I will be continuing.
 
 
BL.jpg

 

Bag Lady

According to GRRM, this book is the first ever short story written in the Wild Cards series. However, it wast published as a part of the series, which had already changed and evolved.
 
I loved this nod towards Asimov:
“What are your orders?”
“To obey my creator, Dr. Maxim Travineck. To guard his identity and well-being. To test myself and my equipment under combat conditions, by fighting enemies of society. To gain maximum publicity for the future Modular Men Enterprises in so doing. To preserve my existence and well-being.”
“Take that, Asimov”, Travineck said.
 
He uncorked the bottle of vodka and raised the bottle on high in a toast.
“New Prometheus,” he said, “my ass.”
 
and this witty repartee:
“I am beginning to realize, said the android, raising a hot buttered rum to his lips, that creator is a hopeless sociopath.”
Black Shadow cnsidered this, “I suspect, if you don’t mind a touch of theology, this just puts you in the boat with the rest of us,” he said.

 

 

Unbound

1.jpg
 
 
Read my review here.
 
 
A good month that was full of reading, I’d say. How was was your March reading-wise?
 
 
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review SPOILER ALERT! 2017-03-29 01:19
Fathers and Fear
Frankenstein - Mary Shelley,Maurice Hindle

It is said that Frankenstein is about the horror and despair of giving birth.  Mary Shelley wrote it after a dream she had, a dream that occurred after an evening of ghosts in Geneva.  It also occurred after miscarriage and a death of a child.  Upon reading Mary Shelley’s diaries, one cannot help but think of how she viewed pregnancy with a tinge of fear and perhaps despair, not only because of her own experiences but also because of her own birth.  Yet, for all of its focus on the fear of birth, it is absentee fatherhood or even husband hood that seems the focus.

 

                Mary Shelley (hence MS) ran off with Percy Shelley (hence PS) while he was still married to his first wife, Harriet.    Let’s be clear, he abandoned his wife and two children to run off with Mary.  At one point, he seemed to float the idea of some type of threesome (perhaps foursome) with him as center, but Harriet never bit.  Despite the work of some authors and critics, like Mark Twain, Harriet Shelley never had the good press that MS and PS did.  In all fairness to PS, one should note that the marriage with Mary seems in large part to have been an attempt to gain custody of his children by Harriet, after she committed suicide.  PS was not a faithful husband to his second wife any more than he was to his first.  It is possible (and I think it highly likely) that PS had an affair Claire Claremont, MS’s step-sister.

 

                Frankenstein is about a man who creates life without the aid of a woman and flees in horror, who does not take responsibility for what he has created or done.   Considering the men in MS’s circle this portrayal is hardly surprising.  There was love them and leave them Bryon whose relationships included ones with his half-sister and Claire Claremont, there was Shelley himself, who never seemed to suffer the same way Mary did when she lost a child.

 

                Reading MS’ journals one is stuck not so much by the sheer number of pages that have been removed, but by the sheer number of times that PS and Claire go off somewhere while MS is suffering though a pregnancy related illness.  How many time Claire burst into the Shelley’s chambers.  At the very least, it must have been a strange relationship, a fleeing couple taking a third wheel with them, the third wheel that had been used as cover for their relationship.  Then MS to be left behind while PS and Claire went rambling.

 

                Did Mary feel something of the abandonment that Harriet must have felt?  MS did resent Claire, she confirmed as much in her lifetime, is this part of the reason why?

 

                And it is those that the absentee father leaves who bear the cost.  While it is true that Victor’s friend and younger brother are murdered by the monster, his wife Elizabeth and maid/companion Justine are murdered simply because of the actions and inactions of both the monster and Victor.  Victor could have saved Justine if he only spoke up, but he doesn’t.  He could have stopped the tragedy if he had taken responsibility for his actions, had ever tried to right his mistake.  He possess an inability to shoulder any part of the blame or to act to stop the unfolding events.

 

                And that makes him a far different monster than the one he creates.

 

                And one wonders, one must wonder, if there is a bit of PS and Harriet in Victor and his monster.  PS marrying Harriet in part to “save and educate” her, in part to shove it in his father’s face.  Then losing interest in both wife and children, leaving them for a younger girl.  There is no one cause for suicide, but surely PS’s treatment of Harriet must have contributed something.

 

                Even as we condemn the monster for his actions, we feel pity for him.

 

                Perhaps the novel is also a bit of a dig at her father and is remarriage after the death of Mary Wollstonecraft.  Godwin remarried in 1801 (Wollstonecraft died in 1797) and prior to that he had left the young MS and her half-sister Fanny in the care of a friend.  Victor does nothing for his son and yet seeks to have another second family with Elizabeth much like Percy leaving Harriet, or William Godwin marrying a woman with two children.  Is the suicide of her half-sister, Fanny Imlay, also present in the story?  It is unclear.  But one could argue that Imlay was abandoned by her family in an emotional sense at the least.

 

It is said that Frankenstein is about the horror and despair of giving birth.  Mary Shelley wrote it after a dream she had, a dream that occurred after an evening of ghosts in Geneva.  It also occurred after miscarriage and a death of a child.  Upon reading Mary Shelley’s diaries, one cannot help but think of how she viewed pregnancy with a tinge of fear and perhaps despair, not only because of her own experiences but also because of her own birth.  Yet, for all of its focus on the fear of birth, it is absentee fatherhood or even husband hood that seems the focus.

 

                Mary Shelley (hence MS) ran off with Percy Shelley (hence PS) while he was still married to his first wife, Harriet.    Let’s be clear, he abandoned his wife and two children to run off with Mary.  At one point, he seemed to float the idea of some type of threesome (perhaps foursome) with him as center, but Harriet never bit.  Despite the work of some authors and critics, like Mark Twain, Harriet Shelley never had the good press that MS and PS did.  In all fairness to PS, one should note that the marriage with Mary seems in large part to have been an attempt to gain custody of his children by Harriet, after she committed suicide.  PS was not a faithful husband to his second wife any more than he was to his first.  It is possible (and I think it highly likely) that PS had an affair Claire Claremont, MS’s step-sister.

 

                Frankenstein is about a man who creates life without the aid of a woman and flees in horror, who does not take responsibility for what he has created or done.   Considering the men in MS’s circle this portrayal is hardly surprising.  There was love them and leave them Bryon whose relationships included ones with his half-sister and Claire Claremont, there was Shelley himself, who never seemed to suffer the same way Mary did when she lost a child.

 

                Reading MS’ journals one is stuck not so much by the sheer number of pages that have been removed, but by the sheer number of times that PS and Claire go off somewhere while MS is suffering though a pregnancy related illness.  How many time Claire burst into the Shelley’s chambers.  At the very least, it must have been a strange relationship, a fleeing couple taking a third wheel with them, the third wheel that had been used as cover for their relationship.  Then MS to be left behind while PS and Claire went rambling.

 

                Did Mary feel something of the abandonment that Harriet must have felt?  MS did resent Claire, she confirmed as much in her lifetime, is this part of the reason why?

 

                And it is those that the absentee father leaves who bear the cost.  While it is true that Victor’s friend and younger brother are murdered by the monster, his wife Elizabeth and maid/companion Justine are murdered simply because of the actions and inactions of both the monster and Victor.  Victor could have saved Justine if he only spoke up, but he doesn’t.  He could have stopped the tragedy if he had taken responsibility for his actions, had ever tried to right his mistake.  He possess an inability to shoulder any part of the blame or to act to stop the unfolding events.

 

                And that makes him a far different monster than the one he creates.

 

                And one wonders, one must wonder, if there is a bit of PS and Harriet in Victor and his monster.  PS marrying Harriet in part to “save and educate” her, in part to shove it in his father’s face.  Then losing interest in both wife and children, leaving them for a younger girl.  There is no one cause for suicide, but surely PS’s treatment of Harriet must have contributed something.

 

                Even as we condemn the monster for his actions, we feel pity for him.

 

                Perhaps the novel is also a bit of a dig at her father and is remarriage after the death of Mary Wollstonecraft.  Godwin remarried in 1801 (Wollstonecraft died in 1797) and prior to that he had left the young MS and her half-sister Fanny in the care of a friend.  Victor does nothing for his son and yet seeks to have another second family with Elizabeth much like Percy leaving Harriet, or William Godwin marrying a woman with two children.  Is the suicide of her half-sister, Fanny Imlay, also present in the story?  It is unclear.  But one could argue that Imlay was abandoned by her family in an emotional sense at the least.

 

                Reading this novel, it is hard not see it as anything but condemnation of a men who father children, who marry and then leave, abandoning the women and children but also leaving them with the hard work.  Then perhaps, returning and upset at the way things have turned out.  Even at the beginning of science fiction, even before the genre had a name, Shelley was showing us what it could be.  It puts the Sad and Rabid puppies to shame, doesn’t it?

 

                Reading this novel, it is hard not see it as anything but condemnation of a men who father children, who marry and then leave, abandoning the women and children but also leaving them with the hard work.  Then perhaps, returning and upset at the way things have turned out.  Even at the beginning of science fiction, even before the genre had a name, Shelley was showing us what it could be.  It puts the Sad and Rabid puppies to shame, doesn’t it?

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