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review 2017-03-29 22:02
Review: People of the Sun by Jason Parent
People of the Sun - Jason Parent

 

People of the Sun has everything I love to find in a book. It's a mix of horror, sci-fi, thriller, and dark fantasy, and it ticked all the boxes for me - I'm especially fussy when it comes to sci-fi and fantasy too, so they are not boxes that are easily ticked! It really has something for every reader within its pages. Seriously, is there anything this guy can't put his pen to?

 

I was totally captivated by the characters, completely immersed in their world, their experiences and their emotions. The world around me ceased to exist while I had the book in my hands. I enjoyed watching the characters grow and change throughout the story. Seeing them become more human and relatable, both for the better and for the worse.

 

People of the Sun explores what it is to be human, it delves into the good, and the bad, and the effect they have on those around us. It's a sad poignant tale, but at the same time it's tension filled and has plenty of action. I was sad to see the story come to an end. I tried to draw it out. I didn't want to say goodbye. I wanted to savour it and stay with the characters longer, but I failed miserably and ended up reading it in one sitting. I really hope there is more to this story in the future especially after that ending, it killed me.

 

Highly recommended!

 

 

 

 

Reviews also posted to my blog: Scarlet's Web
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review 2017-03-09 15:00
Wrathbone and Other Stories Review
Wrathbone and Other Stories - Jason Parent

The titular story, Wrathbone, was a fantastically disturbing read. The unreliable narrator - was he crazy? wasn't he? - was used to the fullest advantage here. That narration combined with Parent's flair for describing mind-melting scenes of horror delivered pure awesomeness. Henry Rathbone was a figure I desperately wanted to save. I felt a surprising amount of pity for him rather quickly. I found myself actually hoping things would work out for the best for the family. (Which is unusual considering I'm normally happy to see lots of death.)

 

The Only Good Lawyer was one of those cases where you knew it was going to end with a serious comeuppance. And yet knowing that it was going to end a certain way did absolutely nothing to abolish my enjoyment of the read. In fact, Parent still managed to deliver a small surprise at the end of the story. I was so caught up in what I was reading that I'd forgotten a key point. I rather enjoyed it!

 

Dorian's Mirror was odd. I didn't like it as much as the previous two, but it had an appeal that I can't deny. Obviously a riff on The Picture of Dorian Gray, Dorian's Mirror is for the modern age. I think what draws me to it is the obsession with eyeballing the things we see wrong with us. It's hard to look away from a perceived fault. And although Parent carries it to extremes here, the root is the same.

 

For the Birds was my least favorite. There wasn't anything wrong with it, necessarily. But, given the quality the author delivered with the other three stories, it seemed a cheap shot. Possibly even filler. This was a story I'd expect from someone who relied far more on shock and gore tactics than true talent to get someone creeped out.

 

Revenge is a Dish finishes this collection of stories, and changes my opinion on the book overall. Reading Wrathbone I thought I was in for a pure horror treat. By the time I was done with Revenge is a Dish, I feel like I've just finished with a collection of Tales from the Crypt episodes. Pretty typical revenge story fare about a chef that got caught stuffing his sausage somewhere he shouldn't have and feels he's the wronged party.

 

Overall, the stories range between okay to awesome, with Wrathbone maybe setting the bar a bit too high. Jason Parent has the ability to do some truly wicked things with his mind. I hope he continues to cultivate his talent and doesn't take the easy roads for horror too much in the future.

 

Disclaimer: I received this book from the author for review consideration.

Source: www.scifiandscary.com/wrathbone-and-other-stories-review
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text 2017-03-05 03:05
It's 3am, do I go to bed or do I start Jason Parent's new book...
People of the Sun - Jason Parent

 

Who am I kidding, I've been itching to read this since I got it. Sleep can wait!

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text 2016-12-28 12:45
Char's Horror Corner Top 5: Short Story Collections/Anthologies Read in 2016!
Greener Pastures - Michael Bukowski,Michael Wehunt,John Boden,K. Allen Wood
The Wrath of Concrete and Steel - John Claude Smith
Wrathbone and Other Stories - Jason Parent
The Valancourt Book of Horror Stories - Professor of Strategic Management Bernard Taylor,Michael P. Kube-McDowell,Christopher Priest
The Seeds of Nightmares - Tony Tremblay
The Martian Chronicles - Ray Bradbury

 

I've been lucky to have read a ton of great books this year here at my Horror Corner. I'll be doing a few different posts about my favorites and this one tackles short story collections and anthologies. If you're interested in learning more, please click the titles to see my original review. 

 

These are in no particular order but:  Every. Single. One. Of them. ROCKED!

 

Greener Pastures by Michael Wehunt is the one selection in my top 5 that was written by an author previously unknown to me. It absolutely knocked my socks off and I cannot say enough good things about it. I still think about the title story and the "spaces between" any time I hear any stories about long distance truckers. 

You can get your copy here: Greener Pastures

 

The Wrath of Concrete and Steel by John Claude Smith contains a few stories that are unlike anything I've read before. I've read over 170 books this year alone, so for me to say that is really something. Unfortunately, I do not believe this book is currently available anywhere. 

 

Wrathbone by Jason Parent was great fun! The title story was a curious mix of historical fiction and dark fiction which I didn't think was possible to pull off properly, but Jason did it and he made it look easy. I still think about "The Only Good Lawyer"  and the witch doctor all the time. You can find your copy here: Wrathbone and Other Stories

 

 

The Valancourt Book of Horror Stories is an absolutely terrific anthology put together by one of my favorite publishers. What sets this one apart and above the rest is the fact that it's not the same old horror stories that you read in every other anthology. The authors included within are often not known for their horror stories at all, which was a nice treat. Plus, there's a kick-ass story from Michael McDowell in there. The price of the collection is worth it, just for Miss Mack, in my opinion. 

You can get a copy here: The Valancourt Book of Horror Stories

 

 

The Seeds of Nightmares by Tony Tremblay was a breath of fresh air. Containing original and creative stories, often with a touch of poignancy, I found myself wishing I had read this collection sooner. I know that the story Stardust will stick with me forever. You can get your copy here: The Seeds of Nightmares

 

 

Bonus: The Martian Chronicles by Ray Bradbury. What more can I say about this widely read classic? The stories were creative and imaginative even by today's standards. I think any fiction reader's library is incomplete without this volume. 

So fill that void here: The Martian Chronicles

 

 

Thanks for reading and I'll hope you stick with Char's Horror Corner in 2017, for your dark fiction and horror reading recommendations. 

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review 2016-11-10 17:16
Seeing Evil by Jason Parent (audiobook)
Seeing Evil - Jason Parent

Seeing Evil is a book about the evil human beings inflict on one another. It’s more thriller than horror but has a few disturbing scenes that fall more into the horror realm.

 

Michael was tragically orphaned as a young boy. Now he’s a teen living with foster parents and dealing with the typical cruelties and horrors of high school. He’s quiet, keeps his head down and minds his own business but one day he finds himself the target of one of the biggest bullies in the school. This scene is horrifying and too well written, if you ask me. I felt like I was in that bathroom stall with unfortunate Michael and, eww, I did not want to be there! Later Michael has a dark and dire vision that eventually comes true. He confides in his police detective friend, Samantha, and she later uses this information to guide her in an investigation.

 

And this is where I had a problem. The writing is good and the teen characters are amazingly well drawn. You really feel for them. But I would be lying if I didn’t admit that Samantha using Michael, pretty much without his ok, to help her catch a killer bothered the hell out of me. This poor kid had already lived through hell and here she was forcing him to see things he should never have to see. Once? Okay, I get it. But again and again, after he tells her he doesn’t want to do it? Well, that is completely awful no matter her motives.

 

I listened to this book as an unabridged audio but I’d suggest you read it as a paperback. I felt the female narrator gave a flat performance and didn’t do justice to the material and it took me way too long to warm up to her voice.

 

Those two things aside, the book was a creepy and disturbing read with characters you will care about. The story gets a four, the narration a three so I guess I’m ending with a 3 ½.

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