logo
Wrong email address or username
Wrong email address or username
Incorrect verification code
back to top
Search tags: Peter-May
Load new posts () and activity
Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
text 2018-09-18 22:11
Reading progress update: I've read 59 out of 320 pages.
Jaws - Peter Benchley

For the Drowning Deep

 

It's been more than forty years since I read this and boy is it different reading this as an adult versus as a kid.

 

The inflation. The casual sexism. The really weird history of the serial rapist.

 

I am liking the time he takes to explain the cast of characters, and the whole economy of the Hamptons. And I love the newspaper editor.

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
text 2018-09-18 00:23
Reading progress update: I've listened 73 out of 254 minutes.
The Wild Robot - Peter Brown

Roz is now the accidental mother of a gosling, and it's giving me Horton Hatches the Egg vibes.

 

This started off as a robot trying to figure out how to survive in a realistic wilderness without human guidance. It has since morphed into a talking animal book, which disappoints me a little. I'm trying to adjust, but it's weird that a beaver is advising Roz on how to make her home more inviting to guests ("grow a garden!") and telling her she needs to find a way to heat her home before it gets colder.

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
text 2018-09-17 22:57
Reading progress update: I've listened 27 out of 254 minutes.
The Wild Robot - Peter Brown

"The robot's programming stopped her from being violent, but nothing stopped her from being annoying."

 

Go, robot, go.

 

There's a sequel, or I would be much more worried about this being a tearjerker with a rusted, dead robot at the end. I don't think even 24 hours have passed since Roz was first booted up by curious otters, and she's already been caught in a mudslide and is currently being attacked by bears.

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2018-09-17 21:55
Jaws / Peter Benchley
Jaws - Peter Benchley

It was just another day in the life of a small Atlantic resort until the terror from the deep came to prey on unwary holiday makers. The first sign of trouble a warning of what was to come took the form of a young woman's body, or what was left of it, washed up on the long, white stretch of beach. A summer of terror has begun.

 

I read this book for the Fear the Drowning Deep square of my 2018 Halloween Bingo card.

This is purportedly a book about a monster shark. I would beg to differ—the shark is just a catalyst for the very human drama that became the main thing for me. Police chief Martin Brody is a conscientious policeman—he isn’t perfect and he knows it, but he is striving to do the right thing. He’s not up against the shark really, he’s up against those with money who want to make more money. Shutting down the town beach during the July 4th weekend is going to hurt the community economically, but powerful people seem to value money over human life.

We get a good look at “the old boys club” in action in Jaws. Their indifference to potential deaths is far scarier than the enormous Great White that is cruising the shore. They are as indifferent as the beast itself. We also get a glimpse back in time to society in the 1970s—women are still mostly housewives, maybe with a side job to help with family finances. Only the elderly woman who runs the post office seems to be able to speak her mind without reservation, as she has no husband to police her behaviour.

The icthyologist who admires the shark, but has a sexual liaison with Ellen Brody, ends up self-destructing—it’s unclear which issue he’s being punished for, siding with nature against humanity or breaking societal expectations with another man’s wife.

I’m pretty sure that I read this back in junior high school (at the time it was originally published), but the only familiar thing was that cover! I’m pretty sure that my teenage self was reading entirely for the sharky bits, not so much for the human stuff.

 

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2018-09-16 13:31
Space Opera Buffa: "Salvation" by Peter F. Hamilton
Salvation - Peter F. Hamilton


"Book One in the Salvation Sequence, a dazzling space opera trilogy from master of the genre, Peter F. Hamilton

Know your enemy - or be defeated.

AD 2204
An alien shipwreck is discovered on a planet at the very limits of human expansion - so Security Director Feriton Kayne selects a team to investigate. The ship's sinister cargo not only raises bewildering questions, but could also foreshadow humanity's extinction. It will be up to the team to bring back answers, and the consequences of this voyage will change everything.

Back on Earth, we can now make deserts bloom and extend lifespans indefinitely, so humanity seems invulnerable. We therefore welcomed the Olyix to Earth when they contacted us. They needed fuel for their pilgrimage across the galaxy - and in exchange they helped us advance our technology. But were the Olyix a blessing or a curse?

AD 50,000
Many lightyears from Earth, Dellian and his clan of genetically-engineered soldiers are raised with one goal. They must confront and destroy their ancient adversary. The enemy caused mankind to flee across the galaxy and they hunt us still. If they aren't stopped, we will be wiped out - and we're running out of time.

Salvation is the first title in a stunning science fiction trilogy by Peter F. Hamilton."


From the book blurb.


"Interstellar war is a fantasy. It makes no sense. Economically, for resources, for territory...it's all crap. Hong Kong doesn't even make drama games about it anymore."


In "Salvation" by Peter F. Hamilton

 

 

If you're into stuff like this, you can read the full review.

More posts
Your Dashboard view:
Need help?