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text 2018-07-05 10:06
Reading progress update: I've listened 305 out of 4260 minutes.
Sherlock Holmes: The Definitive Collection - Arthur Conan Doyle,Stephen Fry

Done with A Study in Scarlet. I really liked the first chapter of the second part, but like in my previous read, as the story unfolded, I started to get antsy to be done with it.

 

I'm listening to The Sign of the Four's Intro now. I did not know Doyle respected Wilde so far as to keep praising his work after the trials. There is also this amazing meta aspect, where Fry is concerned too that is making me smile.

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text 2018-07-03 23:47
Reading progress update: I've listened 39 out of 4260 minutes.
Sherlock Holmes: The Definitive Collection - Arthur Conan Doyle,Stephen Fry

The landlady had become so accustomed to my late habits that my place had not been laid nor my coffee prepared. With the unreasonable petulance of mankind I rang the bell and gave a curt intimation that I was ready.

 

This is amazing. Not only does Watson poke at himself in this very honest, and very aware, way, but there is so much that went right over my teen self. Like the fact that he was spending without care, being very lazy, slept a lot, and "suffered from nerves". He was PTSD'd to all hell. And without right out saying it, future him knows that he wasn't OK, and maybe also that the way Holmes induced his curiosity might have given him the jolt to snap out of the spiral-down.

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text 2018-07-03 11:46
Reading progress update: I've listened 9 out of 4260 minutes.
Sherlock Holmes: The Definitive Collection - Arthur Conan Doyle,Stephen Fry

Between pitch and content, I'm already in love, and I'm just at the intro

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review 2018-06-30 22:21
Myths in Adventism: An Interpretive Study of Ellen White, Education, and Related Issues
Myths in Adventism: An Interpretive Study of Ellen White, Education, and Related Issues - George R. Knight

Myths pop up everywhere from history, to religion, and in the understanding of someone’s writing.  George R. Knight writes in Myths Adventism: An Interpretive Study of Ellen White, Education, and Related Issues about numerous issues that influence the thinking of Adventists educators and administrators.

 

Knight tackles 19 “myths” related to Adventist education, institutions, and thoughts over the course of 250 pages.  Beginning with myth related to “Historical and Philosophical” issues including those surrounding Ellen White, Knight clears up historical inaccuracies and puts Mrs. White’s writing not only in the context in which lines are written but what was going on at the time that made her write certain statements.  Knight then turned his attention to “Institutions and People” focusing on such issues the interplay between home and school, human nature, and intellectualism in Adventist education.  The largest section of the book about “Curriculum and Methods”, Knight focused on sacred and secular topics, Bible as textbook, literary subjects, religious instructions, in-classroom environments, and recreation and manual labor.

 

As a child of a retired Adventist teacher, I appreciated this book in seeing what my mother had to face over the course of approximately 35 years of her career.  Knight’s research and writing are fantastic throughout the book giving the reader amazing insights in how myths are given life in numerous fields and situations.  However, my problem with this book is not with Knight but with the publishers who in designing the book and blurbs made this book something it wasn’t.  The front cover blurb literally says, “A thoughtful look at misconceptions about Ellen White and Adventist life that have long caused controversy in the church” but nothing about education which is what the book is about and instead makes it appear it’ll be about numerous other things about Adventism.  Though Knight attempts to shield the publishers for their decision in the preface, it’s unfortunately makes the reader realize they might have gotten hoodwinked.

 

Overall Myths in Adventism is an insightful look at the cultural clashes in Adventist education by a writer that knows how to do research in Adventist history and education.  However even though George R. Knight is fantastic, the decisions of the publishers to make this book appear to be something that it’s not is very annoying and future readers need to know about it.

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review 2018-06-20 06:40
Difficult
Invisible Man - Ralph Ellison

On various fronts. The overarching subject, the sense of hopelessness, helplessness and despair, the long-winded, meandering way the story is told (which is on par with the idea that it is a stream-of-conscience recount), and the purpose way in which this guy's obliviousness is made plain (and cringe-inducing) for the reader (and the teller).

 

Found it brilliant, at points boring and quite maddening.

 

Oh, and I leave it with a feeling akin to what Catcher in the Rye left me.

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