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Search tags: best-humor
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review 2019-01-15 15:38
This is the end, my friends...
Summoned to the Thirteenth Grave - Darynda Jones

Book source ~ NetGalley (for tour in 2018)

 

Charley Davidson broke the only rule she was supposed to follow and God (yes, Him) flicked her like a bug into a Hell dimension as punishment. Ok, maybe he didn’t actually flick her. He may have whisked her. Or scooted? Anyway, after 100+ years of exile she’s back and she’s not sure what she’s missed more: Reyes, her daughter, her friends or coffee. But just because she’s been gone doesn’t mean shit hasn’t hit the fan and now she has to roll up her sleeves, assuming she has sleeves, and get to work.

 

I finished this epic final installment of an even bigger epic series and all I could hear is the Doors playing The End. That was a stupid ringtone I picked for my phone, but anyway, I’m sad to say it is The End for Charley’s adventures. However, I left the last page behind with hope in my heart that there will, at some point, be a book/trilogy/series featuring the ever adorable Beep and her army facing off with Lucifer.

 

I laughed, I cried, I snorted, I drooled, so it was a typical Charley book in that respect. But I was also floored by a certain revelation. Woo doggie! I totally did not see that coming. And that thing, at the end? I never would have thought of that! So, goodbye for now, my friends. I hope to see you again soon in another dimension. Or installment. Or whatever. Oh, who am I kidding? I’m totally going to re-read this entire series and soon, so get some cookies and put on the tea!

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review 2019-01-15 12:45
THE PIGEON by Andrew Lennon and Christopher Motz
The Pigeon: Nothing Goes Unseen - Christopher Motz,Andrew Lennon,Ryan C. Thomas

Don't let this rather vague-looking cover trick you into thinking this is not a full-fledged horror story. THE PIGEON is not some little psychological tale with a talking bird or poetry like an Edgar Allan Poe story. And it's not some fancy literary fiction either. It's an in-your-face, fast paced, gory, twisty-turny little novella that might even make you laugh at times. How much fun is that? A lot! It's a LOT of fun.

 

When Andrew Lennon asked me if I could review this book last fall I think it was, I said sure without really knowing what I was getting myself into. If I had known it was this short, I probably would have tried to squeeze it in even sooner.

 

A young lady hates her job and is being stalked by her ex-boyfriend. He shows up at her house and things just go downhill from there. Fast! There's no way I can get across to you how surprised I was at nearly every turn this story took. And it's because of the fact that I want you to be surprised too, that I'm not going to go further into the plot.

 

If you like your horror unpredictable, bloody and gory, with a sense of humor on the side? THE PIGEON is for you!

 

Highly recommended! Get your copy here: THE PIGEON

 

*I was provided an e-copy of this novella in exchange for my honest feedback. This is it.*

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review 2019-01-15 03:32
Death and Taxes by J. Zachary Pike
Death and Taxes: An Urban Fantasy Mystery - J. Zachary Pike
J. Zachary Pike's small Kindle novella is hard to describe.  It's about a happy go lucky guy named Arther C. Torr that gets out of college and does whatever he wants.  Until his college loan needs to be paid off. He's practically unhirable but he finds a job working at a doughnut shop.  Not any doughnut shop, but a shop that is run by a former police detective that is now a private detective.  The detective is also familiar with the paranormal.
 
This is a short, 34 pages and free.  I got hooked on J. Zachary Pike after reading one of the best fantasy series I've read in a long time, the Dark Profit Saga. Pike is a self-published writer and while his 2 novellas were a little above mediocre, his series is fun and hilarious to read.  I can see where if he wanted to do a complete book about Arthur.    I'll try to get a couple of reviews on them out to see if they pique any interest in any of you.
Death and Taxes by J. Zachary Pike
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review 2019-01-13 17:41
I'm still glad I was an only child
Dear Sister - Alison McGhee,Joe Bluhm

Dear Sister by Alison McGhee (with illustrations by Joe Bluhm) was a happy accident. It happened to be returned while I was working at circulation and when I flipped through it I was intrigued enough to check it out for myself. The book is written in a series of letters and drawings from a boy who has just been saddled  blessed with a baby sister. His parents want him to write to her so they can put it in her baby book but he has his own ideas of what to write. From the start, his letters and drawings are quite hostile and he makes a point of saying that the 'wardens' have forced him into contributing. Their relationship is typical of an older sibling who has no interest in catering to an annoying, screaming infant/toddler/preschooler. Their age difference is about 8 years which explains a lot of the animosity. He always refers to her as 'sister' because the name he had picked out for her (and which wasn't used) was so good that he'd hate to slip up and call her that because then she'd be sad that it wasn't her name. This is one of those perfect little books that shock you when you realize they're not more in demand. It felt totally authentic and the illustrations were absolutely fantastic. They were a mix of childlike drawings which aged up with the character and a few realistic looking pencil drawings from a third person standpoint. The whole story is heartwarming and the ending was so sweet that I actually cried. What a great little book! 10/10

 

A/N: I discovered that Joe Bluhm illustrated one of my favorite William Joyce books The Fantastic Flying Books of Mr. Morris Lessmore and now I'm on a mission to find more of his work. No wonder I liked the drawings in this so much! XD

 

Source: Amazon.com

 

                                  Source: Amazon.com

 

What's Up Next: I'm waiting on another volume of the Elfquest Archives so that I can hopefully do my reviews in one post. We shall see...

 

What I'm Currently Reading: The Historian by Elizabeth Kostova (reread)

Source: readingfortheheckofit.blogspot.com
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review 2019-01-12 22:11
A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court
A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court - Mark Twain;Samuel Clemens

First the book . . .

 

This story is about Samuel Clemens (Mark Twain) meeting a man on a castle tour and the man knew everything about the castle. Later, Twain meets the man and they talk a while about how this man, Hank Morgan new so much about the castle. Hank didn’t tell a story, but left Twain with a book, or better yet a diary of Hank falling asleep and waking thirteen hundred years earlier.

 

Hank Morgan’s father was a blacksmith and his uncle a horse doctor. Hank ran a gun factory, starting at the bottom and learning everything, to quote:

 

“ I could make anything a body wanted- anything in the world, it didn’t make a difference what; and if there wasn’t any quick newfangled way to make a thing, I could invent one – and do it as easy as rolling off a log.”

 

So Hanks diary becomes the book “A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court”.

 

Well if you’ve read the book, Clemens attacks a lot of issues of his day, our day too. Religion, not really religion but when it is organized so well that it attacks the way a person lives his life. Slavery. He hated it and it even haunted him. Most of what he wrote about slavery were his own feelings. Other things like monarchy, nepotism, politics, and poverty. He even made fun of ad campaigns like soap ads. He brought up some things that even strikes today, which is when he came across was people that would take things as fact if it was said. No evidence of proof, and if evidence was there, it was forgotten as soon as the words were spoken.  He made fun of himself.

 

With the inventiveness of Morgan, he tells a story about how he overcomes these obstacles or at least the obstacles he chooses with modern tools and skillfulness he can create. And then he told of he destructing every advancement he made.

 

About the narrator . . .

 

Nick Offerman has this mid-western accent that does well with the book. It’s probably not an easy to perform, being as dated as it is but he does a good job of it. To me, he started off slow, not very into it but this could have been by design. By the end of the book, he was really going strong. This could also be to Twain having modernized the language of the book as Hank modernized the culture. Maybe not award worthy but Offerman did a good narrative.

 

My thoughts on the book . . .

 

As I said before I started the book, the biggest reason I choose this was the narrator. The book is good, but dated and sometimes hard to keep up with the dated sayings of that time. I am reading the book along with the audio-book and it does give me footnotes to help and some insight on what Clemons/Twain was thinking, or at least what somebody else thought what he was thinking. I would love to see what Clemons would write if he were alive today. I would think he would have a field day mocking both sides of the aisle. With that said, please don’t take this as something I am trying to politicize. I do not participate in political debates of today. It’s like teaching a pig to sing. You will only annoy the pig.

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