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review 2017-09-19 02:01
ARC Review: Saved (Breaking Free #1) by A.M. Arthur
Saved: Breaking Free #1: An Omegaverse Story - A.M. Arthur

I've never read an A/B/O book such as this one. My only exposure to Alpha/Beta/Omega is in shifter books, but this isn't a shifter book.

In this A/B/O universe, there are no shifters. There are no females. There are Alphas who are in charge, Betas who are barren but are allowed to hold jobs and adopt children (usually Beta and Omega children), and Omegas who are the lowest of the low and whose sole purpose, it seems, is to be mated to Alphas and be good little breeders.

Hmmm... that sounds familiar.

In this dystopian future of the United States, the Federal Government is no more, constitutional rights are a thing of the past, and the country is broken up into small provinces which all have their own rules and laws. 

We first meet Braun, an Omega, 20 and close to his first heat, upon his father's death. Now a ward of the state, since omegas are third-class citizens at best, unable to inherit, unable to make any personal choices, Braun is sent to a group home for orphaned omegas. Beaten regularly by his father, abused not just physically but mentally as well, told all his life that his sole purpose is to become some alpha-hole's breeding bitch, Braun is certain that alphas cannot be trusted and that happiness is not something he can expect at all. His own brother Kell is mated to a horrible Alpha, and Braun knows that Kell's lot in life is his future as well.

This was a difficult book to read, and it's just as difficult to write a coherent review without spoilers. I would advise any potential reader to heed the warnings in the blurb. Be prepared to RAGE at the injustices within. There were numerous times when I sat in my chair, my Nook gripped in my hands, and my eyes blinded with tears caused by helpless rage. 

Consent isn't required between an Alpha and his Omega. Domestic discipline is within the law. Omegas have no rights to speak of, and little protection from abuse. 

Yeah, I raged. A lot. 

The themes in this book are rather comparable to our current political climate, and there are many parallels that can be drawn between what happens in the book and what's happening in this world today. 

I liked that Braun, despite his circumstances, still had fight left in him. I liked that Tarek (the Alpha who helps Braun) was considerate and kind and patient. He took the time to win Braun's trust, something Braun didn't give easily, and he helped Braun as much as he could. He wasn't perfect, far from it, but he tried and tried to do the right thing by the young man in his care, no matter how hard Braun fought believing that an Alpha could be kind. 

I also quite liked the two Betas who take Braun in and conceal him, and who help him through his first heat. It wasn't easy reading to watch Braun go through that.

None of this book was easy reading, though there is reason for hope that things may start to change to make the lives of omegas a little easier. 

Kell's book is next. That will likely be even more difficult to get through.

Despite the dark themes inside, I would recommend this series. 



** I received a free copy of this book from Indigo Marketing & Design. A positive review was not promised in return. **

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review 2017-09-15 11:00
ARC Review: Be My Best Man by Con Riley
Be My Best Man - Con Riley

Con Riley never disappoints, and this author just keeps getting better and better.

 

In Be My Best Man, Con not only gives us a beautiful romance, but also head-on tackles one of the big current social issues.

 

Vanya, early 20s, has fled his home country of Russia nearly eight months ago when he was found out as being gay and violently beaten because of his sexuality. Now in Britain, still traumatized and scared, his dreams of becoming a teacher dashed, he is waiting to get this asylum request approved so he can be granted the ability to have a job and earn an income. In his current limbo, though finally safe from persecution for his sexuality, he lives in a run-down hostel where he has befriended a young man and woman from Estonia, who are both in Britain legally as EU citizens but whose status under Brexit is also uncertain. The hostel is not really safe either, though Vanya shares a room with his friend Kaspar. Theft is rampant. Rooms are broken into. Women fear being assaulted.

The author created a character that I immediately connected with. Vanya struggles to learn English, practicing whenever and wherever he can, and his struggles were authentic and realistic. His loneliness was evident, and I felt for him right away.

 

Jason is a man in his early forties, who's recently had a falling out with his foster brother Andrew over the brother's recent engagement and wedding plans. See, it's the 3rd wedding, and Jason, without even meeting the girl in question, has already decided that this is just another mistake. He too felt lonely to me, when he was first introduced, despite being rather successful in his business, and it was fairly clear to me that he was shaped by his childhood experiences and didn't really trust anyone, other than his late foster mother and foster brother.

 

The meet-cute happens in the department store where Kaspar works and Vanya is visiting after his latest asylum appointment and Jason is hiding to wait for a call or text from Andrew. Jason thinks Vanya works in the store, and Vanya wants to practice his English. And get to know the hunky older man.

 

Jason's wrong assumption leads to him hiring Vanya as his personal shopper, and the two begin spending time together. This is where the story really begins to take shape.


Con Riley combined the sweet yet complicated romance that develops between these two men with the social issue of asylum seekers who have no legal standing, are usually running from persecution, scared to death, having to learn the customs of a country so foreign to them, and being generally looked down upon by many people. Vanya's plight, his uncertain status before asylum is granted, his internalized shame, was heart-breaking, and I wanted to reach into the book and hug him and protect him. He keeps a huge secret from Jason, and this secret nearly breaks them.

 

Jason on the other hand is oblivious to Vanya's struggles for a long time, not intentionally of course, but he doesn't realize how traumatized the young man is. He also doesn't realize for a long time how much he's hurting Andrew and his future wife, and how his distrust of Andrew knowing his own heart is jeopardizing the remaining piece of family he has. But he learns. Under Vanya's attention, Jason begins to question decisions he's made, and how wrong he might have been. With Vanya in his life, Jason starts to believe that love might be real after all. He goes to finally meet Andrew's lovely young fiancee, and he begins to see how much they are truly in love, to the point where he even steps in to... well, no, you read this yourself.

 

The author has an extraordinary talent in giving life to the characters and making them feel real. Vanya's skittishness, Jason's irrational anger (born out of heartache), the social circumstances, Vanya making huge mistakes born out of fear - everything in this book was absolutely realistic and relatable.

 

This book (and the romance) flows slowly, and it needs to. Trauma such as Vanya's takes time to overcome. Jason's disbelief in lasting love can't just suddenly disappear. They are both shaped by their experiences, and since neither feels safe to talk freely and openly about their fears, they don't have an easy path to their HEA.

 

Writing their story in the third person present tense was also a stroke of genius, because this reader felt even more connected to the characters this way. Read every word carefully - this isn't a book you can speed-read. You must savor every carefully crafted sentence, every brilliant paragraph, and let the story unfold in real time to get the full impact. Vanya's English is heavily accented, and it's written in such a way, that I could easily "hear" him speaking the words.

 

I cried a few times. I wanted Jason to pull his head out of his ass. I wanted to shield Vanya from the big, bad world and give him shelter. I loved these characters, I loved this story, and I absolutely highly recommend that you read it.

 

Get to it.

 


** I received a free copy of this book from Signal Boost Promotions as part of the review tour for an honest and fair review. **

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review 2017-09-02 00:30
Release Day ARC Review: Finding Mr. Wrong by Charlie Cochet
Finding Mr. Wrong (Dreamspun Desires Book 41) - Charlie Cochet

This story had a solid plotline, but suffered from a bit of overload with all the extra stuffing.

Matthew Hart is a successful business man and the heir to family fortune and high-end furniture and interior decoration company Hart and Home. Twenty years ago, he thought himself in love with Jax Foster, but when Jax and his father disappeared overnight, Matthew was crushed and hasn't really had a serious relationship since. When he has a near-death experience brought on by a severe allergy, he becomes a little scared about the future and decides he needs to find a husband and have children to carry on the family legacy. He even creates a list of attributes this husband needs to have. 

Jax Foster loved Matthew Hart, but his father's gambling addiction and subsequent debts required that they ran from the town. Jax resents his father for what he's put him through, but also loves the man and cannot leave him to his own devices. He's making a name for himself as an artist, designing and creating stained glass pieces. 

When a customer of Hart and Home requires special stained glass inserts for his doors, Matthew and Jax's paths cross and converge.

Mr. Hart Sr, Matthew's father, and Adam, Matthew's PA, both help this along. I liked both of these side characters, especially Adam who really looked out for Matthew.

As Jax and Matthew rekindle their romance, and some truths come out, the suspense part of the plot increases. We have attempted murder, a kidnapping, a mobster enforcer named Rai whom Adam would like to climb like a tree, and Matthew's cousin and crazy wife also play a role.

The sex is hot, with lots of dirty talking, the dialogue had some bite on occasion, and though I didn't like the obvious "big misunderstanding", I did like their relationship. Having both Matthew and Jax alternate in being the narrator helped to understand both of their perspectives, their hopes, and their fears, and made them more sympathetic to me. I could understand that Jax didn't want to give up on his father, despite the addiction, and I could understand that Matthew was wary Jax would run again. 

The lone female in this book was the designated villain, something that I don't particularly care for, and her portrayal was totally OTT. I could believe the mobster money collector, and I could even believe that Adam had the hots for him (hopefully, these two will get their own book), but all in all, it was just a little bit too much, even for a Dreamspun Desires title.

The romance though, that second chance at love, was well done, and I wanted Matthew and Jax to find their HEA. Which, no spoiler here, they did.

Charlie Cochet's writing style is a good fit here, and thankfully not flowery at all. The plot flowed smoothly, without any lulls, and I was engaged throughout the book. It fits within the series by having a somewhat implausible setting (Matthew being a young, hot, successful and rich guy, partnered with a young man from the wrong side of the tracks - fabulous trope, that) and the scenarios within are not close to the realm of realism, but it's entertaining nonetheless. There's not a whole lot of in depth character development, but I didn't expect that from this book. I do expect a whirlwind emotional romance when I read a title in this series, and I got that here. Mission accomplished.


** I received a free copy of this book from its publisher. A positive review was not promised in return. **

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review 2017-09-01 03:11
ARC Review: The Veranda by Rosalind Abel
The Veranda (Lavender Shores Book 3) - Rosalind Abel

Donovan Carlisle, descendant of one of the founding families of Lavender Shores, is the town therapist and knows everyone's secrets. Well, at least everyone who's come to his practice and unburdened themselves. He's had a few unsuccessful relationships and has for many years denied his attraction to his sister's husband, burying that deep inside, knowing that it can never be more. 

Spencer Epstein is the ex-husband of Erica Epstein, Donovan's sister (there are families trees available on the author's website that explain all this, and Spencer actually took Erica's name upon marriage). Spencer is a high-powered, successful attorney. He's known he's gay but his religious preacher parents sent him to "pray-the-gay-away" therapy for years, and he still struggles with the guilt his formative years have instilled in him. He initially came to Lavender Shores to be himself, but then met Erica, and for some reason that isn't clear to me decided to marry her. Meeting Donovan at the engagement party and falling in love at first sight wasn't in his plans, but Spencer denied and buried the attraction and desire for an entire decade, during which he was faithful to his wife and produced two children.

The book starts at a masquerade party being held by one of Donovan's friends in San Fran, which Spencer also attends. Spencer recognizes Donovan immediately and grabs the chance to take what he's wanted for so long, thinking that Donovan will not know who he is, since the mask and costume hides his identity. 

But Donovan does, right after the end of the impromptu blow-job. 

It takes a little while but they come clean about a lot of things, and carefully start dating. Donovan has concerns that being with Spencer will be seen as a betrayal of the family, and the ugly voices inside Spencer from years of reparative therapy rear up at inopportune moments. They struggle, not with each other so much, because there is little internal angst in the relationship, but with how to best move their love into the open. There are kids involved, obviously, and some hard conversation need to be had. 

I really like this series. Each book is very different from its predecessor, and we get unique couples with unique situations. In this book, considering that the two men have secretly lusted for each other for a decade, their relationship evolved rather quickly but still felt realistic under the circumstances. The ILYs come early, but not unexpectedly - again, it felt plausible, considering the circumstances. Their easy banter was fun, and I loved how eager Spencer was to explore all the things he's missed out on, once they jump feet first into the relationship. Their bedroom exploits were part fun and part super hawt, and I loved how easy this part was for them. The relationship overall had a more relaxed tone, which also felt realistic, considering they've known each other as brothers-in-law and family/friends for years. 

I had a couple of niggles. While Erica isn't the only female in this series, her initial portrayal was one-dimensional and flat. She was basically (and has been from the start of the series, really) the designated villain in this book, rude to and full of contempt for pretty much anyone she deems beneath her, and her behavior, through Donovan's and Spencer's eyes both, was cruel and mean and unexplained. It was only later in the book that she became a real human, a real person, when she is honest with Spencer for what is possibly the first time in their entire relationship. We see her struggle with Spencer's new relationship, with the fact that her brother took her place, and that made her real. There was a moment when she let loose a horrible slur, which, I think, shook her up quite a bit once she realized what she said, and then she actually apologized. 

My other niggle is that Donovan and Spencer sounded rather alike on occasion, so much so that it was a little difficult to tell who was talking at a given time. This wasn't something that happened throughout the book, but often enough that I noticed it. Their thought processes seemed very similar during those instances. 

While this wasn't my favorite of the three books so far published, it's still a solid 4 star read for me, a book about second chances and being true to yourself and finally going after what you really wanted all along, and I would definitely recommend it. 

Lamont's story is next. I can hardly wait! 


** I received a free copy of this book from its author. A positive review was not promised in return. **

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review 2017-08-30 02:44
ARC Review: Sins Of The Father by Sam Burns
Sins of the Father (Wilde Love Book 2) - Sam Burns

This is the 2nd book in the Wilde Love series, and it's rather different from the first one. This one was a bit more quiet, if you can call it that, considering that it still has mobsters and family ties, and an FBI investigation. And guns. 

Keegan Quinn, whom me met in the first book, quit his father's business six years ago, after a shootout with the Russian mob left him near death, and lingering pain and stiffness from the injuries still plague him. He's since built a successful business with his restaurant Wilde's. Of course, while he may be out of the family business, he's not out of the family, and he still loves his father. 

Jon Brookfield is an FBI agent tasked with interviewing Keegan to see if he can find out anything about the father's business/crimes. He didn't expect to want to climb Keegan like a tree upon first meeting him, but then the heart wants what the heart wants, and since this series is tropey and OTT and unrealistic, Jon's boss tells him he can quit that part of the investigation and date Keegan.

I didn't actually care about realism while reading, since I didn't expect any to begin with. What I did expect, and what the author delivered, was a grand romance, with a bit of angst, a bit of action, and some hot shmexy times.

I got all that in droves. The book is highly entertaining, the writing flows well, and the story line was well paced, without any lulls or massive time jumps. The supporting cast was fabulous, especially the people at Keegan's restaurant, except for the ex-boyfriend who got what was coming to him, and I enjoyed every minute I spent reading this book. 

I especially enjoyed how much emotions the author gave the characters, and how well the family connections were portrayed. While the actual plot was unrealistic, the relationships weren't. Keegan and Jon begin dating and falling in love, and while their romance was high-speed, it didn't feel insta-lovish. There also was very little relationship angst - when they decided to be together, they were in it for good, and neither doubted the other's commitment. The only thing that might have derailed them was Keegan's father's illness, but even then they fought for what they wanted. Their communications were honest and mostly straight-forward. I liked that a lot.

I'd say, suspend your disbelief while reading, but read it anyway. Sam Burns' books are sweet but not cloying, with great characters, some snark, and hot sexy times - ergo, excellent comfort reads.

I need the next book in this series, like, yesterday! Keep 'em coming! (pun intended)


** I received a free copy of this book from its author. A positive review was not promised in return. **

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