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text 2018-05-01 18:45
April 2018-That's A Wrap!
Stirring the Sheets - Chad Lutzke
Zombie Bigfoot (Creature Quest Series Book 1) - Nick Sullivan
Unbury Carol: A Novel - Josh Malerman
Hammurabi Road: A Tale of Northern Ontario Vengeance - Steve Vernon
It's A Bad, Bad, Bad, Bad World - Curtis M. Lawson
Winterbay Abbey: A Ghost Story - John Bladek,Davonna Juroe,Matt Godfrey
All Systems Red - Martha Wells
Sick House - Jeff Strand
SHOCK Anthology - Joe Pruitt
Figures Unseen: Selected Stories - Steve Rasnic Tem,Matt Godfrey

I've read 13 books this month!

 

Graphic Novels

SAGA, Volume 6 by Brian Vaughan and Fiona Staples 4*

SHOCK Anthology edited by Joe Pruett 4*

 

Total: 2

 

 

Novellas

Stirring the Sheets by Chad Lutzke 5*

All Systems Red by Martha Wells 3.5*

RAGE by Richard Bachman 3*

Manchester Vice by Jack Strange 4*

 

Total: 4

 

Audiobooks

Zombie Bigfoot written and narrated by Nick Sullivan 4*

Hammurabi Road by Steve Vernon 4*

Winterbay Abbey: A Ghost Story by John Bladek and Davonna Juroe, narrated by Matt Godfrey 4.5*

Figures Unseen: Selected Stories by Steve Rasnic Tem, narrated by Matt Godfrey 5*

 

Total: 4

 

 

ARCS/Reads for Review

Unbury Carol by Josh Malerman 3.5*

It's A Bad, Bad, Bad, Bad World by Curtis Lawson 4*

 

Total: 2

 

Random Reads

Sick House by Jeff Strand 3.5*

 

 

 

 

Horror Aficionados Mount TBR Challenge:

Challenge: Read 40 Books Already on my TBR

1. City of the Dead by Brian Keene

2. The Warblers by Amber Fallon

3. October by Michael Rowe

4. It's A Bad, Bad, Bad, Bad World by Curtis Lawson

Status: 4/40

 2018 Running Total: 61

 

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review 2018-04-11 18:45
IT'S A BAD, BAD, BAD, BAD WORLD by Curtis Lawson
It's A Bad, Bad, Bad, Bad World - Curtis M. Lawson

 

Rarely does a book leave me without words, yet here I am. IT'S A BAD, BAD, BAD, BAD WORLD is full of horrible people and terrible situations. It was funny as hell and I loved it!

 

Written in vivid style it was easy to picture this in my imagination as a movie. Combine some ancient relics with your favorite action film, add a bit of any Tarantino movie, sprinkle in a dry sense of humor and finish it off with the "franks and beans" scene from There's Something About Mary-and Voila! You have the recipe for this book. (I tried to fit the battle-nun into my recipe but I can't think of anything, anywhere to liken her to. That's right, there's a bad-ass battle nun, deal with it.)

 

 

 

As I said, this book left me speechless, so I had to borrow descriptions of films to write this review. A friend of mine used the movie Smoking Aces to help describe this book, and I find that to be an apt comparison as well. I just don't know what else to say. Fun, full of action and humor, IT'S A BAD, BAD, BAD, BAD WORLD is a great way to spend a few hours. Highly recommended!

 

 

You can buy a copy here: IT'S A BAD, BAD, BAD, BAD WORLD

 

*I was provided a free e-book copy in exchange for my honest review. This is it!*

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text 2018-04-10 22:30
Reading progress update: I've read 55% and...
It's A Bad, Bad, Bad, Bad World - Curtis M. Lawson

this book is hilarious. It was Sister Michelle that set me off. She's a nun from a special order that protects holy relics or whatever else they're told to do by the church.

 

She's trained like someone on a Seal Team.  But when one character called her "Battle Nun" I just about fell over laughing. I can just picture her in her body armor and habit!

 

This is fast paced and a helluva a lot of fun!

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text 2018-03-03 23:58
February in Review

January in Review

 

(Read: 5 / Reviewed: 6)

 

February sure flew past! I have to say, I had so much fun this month! There was a lot of coffee, wine, and book-related delights! I also had the chance to take part in a Q and A for Booklikes, which really made me feel warm and fuzzy inside! I know it's not that big of a deal, but it's nice to be acknowledged for something you work hard on. See my post about it here!

 

Read

 

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John Dies at the End by David Wong - It's surely becoming a regular enjoyment; taking part in the monthly group reads of Horror Aficionados! I honestly wasn't sure about this one at all - it sounded way too silly for my taste. How wrong I was! What a great start to the month!

 

 

The Devoured by Curtis M. Lawson - I was requested to read and review this one by the author. I'm glad I did, as it was a bit different than my usual reads, but in a good way. I promptly consumed it and reviewed it.

 

Hidden by Benedict Jacka - I started this series in 2015, whilst still in my Urban Fantasy phase. What intrigued my about it, was that it had a male protagonist, something that's not all too common in the genre. This series has never been perfect for me, but I still like to see what trouble Alex gets himself into.

 

The Fallen Kind Vol I: Ghosts Of Nunchi by M. Almelk - After being contacted by the lovely author, I quickly accepted his request! Post-apocalypse but on another planet? It certainly piqued my interest. I reviewed it here.

 

Preta's Realm by J. Thorn - A last minute read for the month. Having been on my Kindle for a long time, I decided to finally give it a shot. It was short, and it included some truly disgusting scenes.

 

Reviewed 

 

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Morium by S.J. Hermann

Splatterpunk Fighting Back by MULTIPLE

A Head Full of Ghosts by Paul Tremblay

The Devoured by Curtis M. Lawson

The Darkest Torment by Gena Showalter (WORST READ)

The Magic Cottage by James Herbert (2017 Review) (BEST READ)

The Awesome by Eva Darrows (2017 Review)

The Fallen Kind Vol I: Ghosts Of Nunchi by M. Almelk

 

I strive for two reviews a week, but I had extra space this month, so I included reviews from last year. I think I'll do that - start to post old reviews, just to have them on this blog. On Goodreads I have over a hundred reviews, dating back to 2011! This month also included a trip to Waterstones, and a basket full of books! All horror, of course.

 

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So how did February go for you? Read anything good? Let me know!

 

Red xx

Source: redlace.reviews/2018/02/28/february-in-review
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review SPOILER ALERT! 2018-02-13 13:13
The Devoured by Curtis M. Lawson
The Devoured - Curtis M. Lawson,Jason Sprenger

The Devoured by Curtis M. Lawson
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Desperately on the trail of his missing son, an old Confederate solider will stop at nothing to reunite the remnants of his family, even if he has to slay every trace of Utgard filth along the way. Finding unexpected companionship in a young orphan, the gunslinger closes in on the god responsible - Thurs, he who hails beyond the stars.

(WARNING: This review contains spoilers.)

I received this book in exchange for an honest review. My thanks to Curtis M. Lawson for giving me the opportunity.

If I wasn't so pessimistic about book to movie adaptations, I'd say this would make a brilliant film - in fact, I imagined it as such; Lawson's stunning use of words did wonders to create vivid imagery inside my head. I found myself thoroughly impressed by the intelligent, highly attractive prose, and by how each scene seamlessly came together to tell an exciting yet ultimately tragic tale. Despite being a short novel of less than two hundred pages, it expressed itself with a lot more substance than other full-length books I've read. A part of me wishes it was longer, but I realise it may have lessened the overall impact.

The character of the "old man" was probably the pinnacle; he was so utterly badass, and believe me when I say I don't use that term lightly. Smart, skilled, and completely unapologetic about his paternal devotion - he's someone I won't forget anytime soon. I'm not saying he was a perfect man, far from it, but he owned every scene he was in. He was the sort of being that would draw an entire room to his entrance, and not just because of his (suspiciously) large size. Emmett, however, whilst starting out with good intentions, truly lost his way as he succumbed to the unsavoury power of Utgard. I could relate with him in a way, in that I'm well aware of the pain of watching a parent slowly fade away. Nothing compares to that feeling of hopelessness, and if given the same opportunity, I'd have likely welcomed the same solution.

Moving on from that painfully honest bit of information.

As with all books I read, I tend to look deeper into things; for meaning in aspects that are probably meaningless. Both Emmett and his father shared a particular trait of being tall, bulky and at times, questionably strong. The fact that Utgard's a stronghold of giants, I was left contemplating a connection. Could it be, that the old man's ancestry is intermingled with otherworldly blood? If anything, at least, I can have my theories, incorrect and insignificant as they may be!

I can't say the Old Western theme has ever appealed to me, but I now feel inclined to seek out similar tales. Of course, few, if any, are going to have such a factual and accurate setting seeped in unforgiving folklore. The historic element of the American Civil War worked wonderfully with the touch of Norse and Native American mythology, and I was impressed with the knowledge poured into it. Either Lawson did his homework, or he simply knows his stuff. I also loved the brutality of the surrounding world- cannibals and witches, oh my! Seriously, sometimes witchcraft should be punishing, rather than glamorous.

In conclusion: The unnamed hero has been one of the coolest characters I've ever had the pleasure to read about. Whilst including both history and the supernatural, Lawson makes a short novel seem like an epic best-seller.

Notable Scene:

"Thought - critical, logical thought - that's what separates a man from an animal. That's what keeps us progressing further and further. That ability to think our way around any and every problem is why the Devourers fear us."

"And what about memory?" Hank asked.

"Memory is what keeps us strong in the toughest times, and it's what prevents us from becoming monsters when our hands are forced to kill. It's the memories of love and happiness that let us come home from the dark places where the world sometimes takes us. It's memory that lets a man find the strength to fight the gods themselves for what's right."


© Red Lace 2018

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Source: redlace.reviews/2018/02/13/the-devoured-by-curtis-m-lawson
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