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review 2019-01-22 16:28
DNF at 25 Percent- A Map of Days is Mind-Numbing
A Map of Days - Ransom Riggs

Sigh. I just DNFed this at 25 percent. I wasn't enjoying the children in this one and following Jacob as he is crowned "The One" through a fourth book didn't sound like a good time to me.

 

I think that the last book ended perfectly and had the right message that life isn't fair. I thought it had a good logic behind Jacob following in his grandfather's steps with him not being able to say with the people he loved. I thought it was up there with "His Dark Materials" in showing children how life can be cruel sometimes. But Riggs ruins it with a handwave with somehow Miss Peregrine and the rest of the children being able to follow Jacob into his world. And then we have Jacob and a lot of the children acting like rebellious jerks. I just got sick of Jacob being rude and nasty and being jealous that Emma was in love with his grandfather. Also, can we talk about how weird that whole thing is??? 

 

I also thought that Riggs missed out on including Jacob's parents in this one. I think that could have made the story more exciting. Jacob is hostile and nasty to Miss Peregrine to the point I wish she had shaken him. And Jacob just wanting to be alone with Emma for kissing and something else just made me sigh. This book started to remind me of the worst parts of Harry Potter when the characters grow up and just become hormones. I am going to compare it to "His Dark Materials" again because to me that book showcased a young girl coming into her own and finding love. I thought it was more true about how many of us find our first love. I didn't feel any of that with Jacob and Emma. 

 

This book seems to be following more mysteries of what Jacob's grandfather was up to which...I just don't care anymore. Seriously. Just pick a new plot and move on to something else.


The pictures in this one felt more meh to me too which is sad. I remember the first book really incorporating the pictures and stories of the Peculiar much better. 

 

I skimmed ahead and read the ending and am glad I passed on finishing this one the whole way through. It just seems to set up another book and I am just not that excited about following this series anymore. 

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review 2019-01-09 23:45
Outdated Part 2 (DNF)
The Future Factor: The Five Forces Transforming Our Lives and Shaping Human Destiny - Michael G. Zey

The Future Factor: The Five Forces Transforming our Lives and Shaping Human Destiny by Michael G. Zey talks about the advent of social, economic, and technological innovations which have shaped us as a species and how these and others will continue to help us evolve.The problem was that it is so outdated that there was little point in me reading beyond page 20. This book was written in 2000 but from the first page made reference to events and situations which considering how fast technology changes made this book (and its many references) obsolete. That's the problem with books about the future...once you reach a certain point they hold no relevance or accuracy beyond a certain window of time.

Source: readingfortheheckofit.blogspot.com
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review 2019-01-09 23:41
Outdated Part 1 (DNF)
Computers Of Star Trek - Lois H. Gresh,Robert E. Weinberg

Computers of Star Trek by Lois H. Gresh & Robert E. Weinberg is exactly what it states to be in its title. It examines the various pieces of technology used in the different iterations of Star Trek through the years and compares it to the reality (and future of) technology.The problem was that it  is so outdated that there was little point in me reading beyond page 20. Computers of Star Trek was written in 1999 and re-published in 2001 which predates the beginning of Star Trek: Enterprise not to mention the reboot movies or Discovery. It was also written before the first iPod (end of 2001) or the first smartphone that didn't rely on a stylus (2007).

Source: readingfortheheckofit.blogspot.com
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text 2019-01-09 23:37
Not to my liking (DNF)
The Sellout: A Novel - Paul Beatty

Besides being on the bestseller list, it came highly recommended to me by a patron at my branch who felt so strongly about it that she went to the shelf, brought it to me at circulation, and insisted I check it out immediately. I hadn't heard anything about this book before she placed it in my hands despite the praise it had received from the literati of the world. This book is a conundrum to me. It has been touted as an uproariously hilarious satirical take on race and culture in America. I'll agree with the latter part of that statement but I didn't find it funny in the least. In fact, I found that the 'jokes' were not at all to my taste. This is probably due to the amount of books on race and culture I've read over the last year but I just couldn't read this book without feeling thoroughly depressed at what felt almost hyper realistic. Now I made it halfway through this book so I feel like I got the overall gist and flavor of the thing. The narrator (name not revealed beyond the nickname BonBon) lives on a farm in the middle of a Californian ghetto called Dickens where you're more likely to see cows on the side of the road than a white person walking their dog. The book starts with him being called before the Supreme Court on an issue of dragging black people's progress back to the time of slavery...because he has a slave of his own. I don't know what this book was but I do know that I didn't like it and I have no intention of finishing it in the future. Progress: 145 out of 289 pages.

Source: readingfortheheckofit.blogspot.com
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review 2019-01-09 23:34
What a weighty tome! (DNF)
Guns, Germs, and Steel: The Fates of Human Societies - Jared Diamond

This is a weighty book, ya'll. Jared Diamond's book had been on my list for ages because once upon a time it had been on one of my recommended reading lists for an undergraduate Anthropology class (I majored in that field). I didn't have the time to read it then (it is 425 pages after all) but the topic still intrigued me. Much like the book above I was interested in the subject matter and found no fault with the writing style (other than it being more like a textbook than casual, recreational reading) but it was so dense that I didn't always feel compelled to pick it up in a spare moment. (I also kept falling asleep for some reason.) Progress: I made it to page 290 before I had to concede defeat (and ship it to the next person waiting to read it).

Source: readingfortheheckofit.blogspot.com
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