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review 2017-05-31 16:59
Saturday Requiem - Nicci French  
Saturday Requiem - Nicci French

Copy on its way! can't wait! One of the best writing duos of all time.

***

I don't think of myself as being a fan of series in general, because so many series that I started out loving became unreadable at some point. Maybe there will be a let down somewhere in the future, or maybe, as with Terry Pratchett, the books will just keep getting better. Fingers crossed.

Frieda is in trouble with powers that be, because she's such a maverick, but she also has more powerful powers that be, which are vague, and mysterious, and appreciate a clever woman. There's her whole extended family of people who mostly aren't related to her, and her cat, and her fire, and her walking. The mystery was fine, although that really isn't the point any more. Mostly now Freida has to deal with her own sort of celebrity, which is horrible for someone who never sought the limelight. And there's this other problem that won't go away...

At this point I wouldn't mind at all if the authors dropped the mystery plot convention altogether. As a means of addressing a topic it is fine, but they could just use a patient. I admit that I love seeing social injustice (and crime) being fought, even if Frieda didn't win.

Advance copy, yay!

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review 2016-10-07 21:13
Everfair - Nisi Shawl
Everfair - Nisi Shawl

It's an alternate history in which a genocide doesn't happen.

It's about a utopian society that isn't so cleverly set up as to avoid all problems, but in which people work to find different, practical, solutions.

It's steampunk that feels utterly plausible.

It's a book that acknowledges the tremendous breadth and depth of people and cultures throughout Africa, although it focuses on one nation.

It is a marvelous accomplishment in every sense of the word, and I'm sure it's going to be one of my top reads for the year, and probably every other reader's list, because it is a book that makes you go "ohhh" and "ahhh", that constantly delights and surprises, even though it is addressing many of the darkest aspects of colonialism.

It's a book that reminded me of how new and appealing are the many voices in scifi these days, and actually makes me feel optimistic about humanity.

Sweet, fancy Moses, it's just a great, sweeping Victorian "ills of society" novel, such as those of Charles Dickens, but with a light touch. It's just perfect.

 

Now goo, read it right away, unless you're devoting October to horror, in which case, okay, but then you have to start it on November first.

 

ARC provided by publisher via GoodReads

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review 2016-09-11 13:29
The Importance of Being Little: What Preschoolers Really Need from Grownups - Erika Christakis
The Importance of Being Little: What Preschoolers Really Need from Grownups - Erika Christakis

The internets just erased the review I'd been working on at length. This book is marvelous, for parents, for teachers, for policy makers. Christakis knows what she's talking about with young children, and she conveys that knowledge in a thoroughly documented, and entertaining, way. Read this book if you're at all interested in the topic.

If you don't have the time, watch the movie <i>Daddy Day Care</i> in which the previously fond-but-not-very-involved fathers of preschoolers become very involved, by letting the kids take the lead. It's brilliant, really.

ARC provided by publisher.

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review 2016-03-06 17:21
The Importance of Being Little: What Preschoolers Really Need from Grownups - Erika Christakis
The Importance of Being Little: What Preschoolers Really Need from Grownups - Erika Christakis

The internets just erased the review I'd been working on at length. This book is marvelous, for parents, for teachers, for policy makers. Christakis knows what she's talking about with young children, and she conveys that knowledge in a thoroughly documented, and entertaining, way. Read this book if you're at all interested in the topic.

If you don't have the time, watch the movie <i>Daddy Day Care</i> in which the previously fond-but-not-very-involved fathers of preschoolers become very involved, by letting the kids take the lead. It's brilliant, really.

ARC provided by publisher.

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