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review 2017-04-27 01:56
Release Day ARC Review: Vodka And Handcuffs by Brandon Witt
Vodka & Handcuffs (Mary's Boys Book 2) - Brandon Witt

The title of this book, much like the first one in this series, plays on the occupations of the two MCs - one a bartender, the other a cop.

Vahin, the bartender, is Muslim, and from India, and gay, and out, which has caused him to be shunned by his family. Marlon, the cop, is black, also gay, but deep in the closet. His partner on the beat is basically a Jeff Sessions wannabe - a racist, homophobic, xenophobic asshole first class, who thinks he can do what he wants because his daddy is a Senator. He's also universally hated by all, including the Chief, and only assigned to Marlon because the Chief figured it'd be best to pair the asshole with his best cop.

Marlon meets Vahin at Hamburger Mary's, they have a night of drunken fun, mostly off-page, and then shit hits the fan, what with the racist cop partner trying to frame Vahin and arrest him, and Marlon being involuntarily outed, and ... yeah... none of it is pretty. This is not a fluffy book. The blurb is a bit misleading. Okay, maybe a lot misleading. Don't expect a fluffy, easy read.

The only real fun on page is when ManDonna struts her stuff - I flove her! She takes no shit, and she will hand you your balls, and you'll thank her for it.

I didn't quite believe the romance in the time line used, and while we get a HFN, I wasn't sure that things were going to last - perhaps we'll see how that goes in a future installment for this series. I do want them to last, I do. I just have doubts that their still fresh relationship can survive the roadblocks that will continue to be in their way, despite marriage equality, and despite the tide slowly turning in their favor. I want to believe that Denver is a bit more enlightened when it comes to racism, homophobia, and xenophobia.

I think this might have worked a little better for me if the book had been longer and had taken the time to really delve into the issues, and perhaps stretch out the time frame a little bit more. The issues raised here are definitely hot topics, and I was a little disappointed that Marlon's forced coming out, and that loathsome, filthy, evil, little cockroach partner's despicable actions weren't given adequate resolutions. Perhaps that is fitting after all - in today's political climate, what with the current administration in the White House, and the "values" for which they stand, it's certainly possible to look at this and realize that, yeah, there won't be any adequate resolutions to homophobia, xenophobia, and blatant racism, until we've gotten rid of the pestilence in orange that empowered this pond scum to strut around with their ignorant flags and "white power" bullshit.

Kudos to this author for making his main characters non-white. I wish there were more books that did that. There is a message within this book too - as a POC, you have to stand up for yourself every damn day, against hatred, against persecution, against blatant ignorance, and if you're POC and gay, your resilience will be tested time and again in triplicate. I commend the author for touching on these difficult subjects with honesty and sensitivity.

The author also sets up the next book toward the end, which will feature Zachary aka Ariel Merman. I had my heart in my throat while reading that bit, and I need the next book, like, now.

This series is quickly becoming a favorite of mine, and that's primarily due to what it isn't - lighthearted fluff. I want to read books that deal with current affairs, and this one definitely does.


** I received a free copy of this book from its publisher. A positive review was not promised in return. **

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review 2017-02-09 02:18
ARC Review: Do You Trust Me by B.G. Thomas
Do You Trust Me? - B.G. Thomas

I read the 2nd, revised edition of this book.

Do You Trust Me didn't work as well for me as Ben's other work, primarily because of the homophobia displayed by one of the main characters.

It's written in Ben's usual somewhat breathless style, and I enjoyed the story overall.

After the death of his wife, and the death of his best friend/brother-in-law, the newly widowed sister-in-law invites Neil to join them for a final vacation at a dude ranch, where Neil's daughter has spent a week each summer with her aunt and uncle for many years.

Neil has long buried the part of him that's gay, and has no plans on letting that part out even after his wife is dead. He's also still grieving his late wife, and his brother-in-law.

At the ranch, Neil is introduced to Cole, a young wrangler who happens to be gay and attracted to the older Neil.

This is also the part where I stopped enjoying this book for a while as Neil's suppressed sexuality makes an appearance dressed up as homophobia. The fact that he goes as far as complaining to the ranch's owner about Cole being gay really ticked me off, and I disliked Neil for a long while after, even if he eventually redeemed himself.

The book is unfortunately too short for me to believe in Neil's change of heart, his decision to have an affair/relationship with Cole, while continuing to question the gay part of himself, and their eventual HEA. It feels compressed into too few pages, considering they're only on the ranch for a week, and there just didn't seem enough time for someone who'd suppressed his homosexuality all his life to find the courage to come out, not only to himself but also to his family.

I think this book would have been better served by giving both Neil and Cole more time to realistically reach their happy ending.


** I received a free copy of this book from its publisher. A positive review was not promised in return. **

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review 2015-07-27 17:51
ARC Review: Get Your Shine On by Nick Wilgus
Get Your Shine On - Nick Wilgus

Nick Wilgus doesn't write romance. I knew that going in, so I didn't expect this book to be all romantic. If you're not familiar with Nick's books, read the first sentence again, and then read all of his books anyway!

What Nick writes are Southern stories pulled from real life. The characters he creates are real. They exist, somewhere, in similar fashion, in some small town in Mississippi. You've met them. You've heard them. You've seen them, in churches, in schools, in all the places.

So, romance, this is not. Oh sure, it features two men in love, in an established relationship, living together, facing all the homophobic crap the good Southern bible thumpers are wont to dish out, because, you know, the bible says so, without ever really thinking about how cruel they are to others.

You know, if you use the bible to hurt someone, you're doing religion wrong.

Anyway, in this book, which is somewhat similar to Nick's Sugar Tree series, we have Henry Hood, who, a few years after losing his parents in a tragic indicent, is suddenly faced with having to take care of his 7 yo nephew Ishmael (Ishy for short), after the boy's mother disappears. Henry's BF Sam, who runs the local grocery store owned by his family, is all for taking care of Ishy, and after a few mishaps, they establish a routine.

Of course, this happening in a small Southern town, the good folks in town are not impressed. Henry's sister is labeled white trash, Henry is kicked off the music group from church, he's labeled a pedophile (because, obviously, that's what gay men are), and there's some blackmail from the good sheriff who wants to figure out what really happened when Henry's parents died.

Henry's sister, the drug addict, is also a homophobe, who doesn't want Henry and Sam to take care of the boy. Not that she has much choice, seeing how she's in jail. And will be there for some time.

As always, Nick Wilgus includes some difficult themes in his book, but despite those difficulties, there is one shining light.

Love.

Love for a child, love between two men, love for your parents, your church, your town. Love for you from others, love that supports. Love that isn't always easy, love that faces hardships and bigotry, love that wins in the end.

Yes, there's heartbreak too. Nick Wilgus ripped my heart into pieces, and then he patched it back together.

His stories are so amazingly real, with such realistic characterizations, and while I ranted against the unfairness of all the things in this book, I also rejoiced at the good people at the core of it.

We must, WE MUST, seek the goodness in people. We must seek to understand their motives and their reasons, if we want to forge relationships built on acceptance and trust. We must remember that at the end of the day we are all only human, imperfect in our words and deeds.

Nick Wilgus allows his characters to do that.

There were tears, of course. Dark secrets come to light and open a chasm of pain. There is unfairness and bigotry, and you just want to scream in anger at it all.

But there is love, so much love, too. And love always wins.

This is not a romance. But it is a book you should read.

Highly recommended.


** I received a free copy of this book from its publisher. A positive review was not promised in return. **

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review 2015-06-03 15:09
DRitC - Love Is An Open Road: FAWN by Nash Summers
fawn - Nash Summers

I'm having a difficult time putting into words what this story did to me.

 

Reading it was almost an ethereal experience. The author's words drew a picture of breezes in trees, of sunlight dancing on blades of grass, and of air shimmering across an open field.

 

There is angst within, there are characters who are evil and unkind, and there are struggles, but through all of it, Rust's voice is clear as a bell, somewhat naive, trusting and getting hurt, but always amazed at the world around him. He sees beauty in things most of us ignore or take for granted, and he captures that beauty in his art. He's a free spirit, a sprite, an innocent, and he manages somehow to keep that air of innocence around him, even when his heart gets broken and crushed into dust.

 

The story speaks of struggles with an abusive father (not Rust's), and of struggles to come to terms with being gay, when that's something you've been drilled and beaten to hate. It speaks of moving forward, of not letting the rain and storms be a negative thing, but dance on, revel in the water splashing your face, find joy in nature and the circle of life.

 

There were tears. Oh, so many tears, for Rust and for Ancel, for the things they have to endure, for their time apart, for the hurt and pain.

 

But there is love, too, and it is beautiful. It is Heaven.


I beg you, read this. It's free. Though I would gladly pay for this.

 

Nash Summers, if MAPS hadn't convinced me of your talent, this story surely would. Thank you for writing this. I was blown away.

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review SPOILER ALERT! 2014-03-25 21:42
Book Review: Sex and Candy by Diana DeRicci
Sex and Candy (Arbor Heights) - Diana DeRicci

Attention!! Spoilers!!! Read at your own risk!!!

 

 

 

High on the sexy times, high on the fluffy, sweet part, loads of subplots and low on pages, this novella suffered from trying to do too much without ever actually delving deeply enough into any one subject. And that's a shame.

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