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text 2017-12-08 14:01
#19 Follow Friday with book bloggers: Wanda's Book Reviews

 

It's Follow Friday with book bloggers! Meet Wanda, a book lover who cherishes fantasy books and penguins! What? Read on to find out more!

 

Follow Wanda's blog on BookLikes: http://wandapedersen39.booklikes.com/

 

 

When did you discover that you’re a bookworm?

 

I guess I knew before I started school.  Our small town didn’t have kindergarten, so the June before we were to start Grade One, we had to go do some tests to see if we were ready to start school. I came home from those tests outraged because they hadn’t taught me to read!

 

How did your blogging adventure start?

 

I’m all about projects. When I turned 50, I started reading the NPR List of Science Fiction and Fantasy Finalists (https://www.npr.org/2011/08/07/138938145/science-fiction-and-fantasy-finalists). I decided to start a blog to keep myself on track. I discovered that I enjoyed the process and I have just kept on blogging about all of my reading.

 

 

You’ve completed your 2017 reading challenge!  Yay, congrats!  Reveal your secret—how did you read 250 books in one year?  It’s an amazing book total!

 

I don’t have as many demands on my time as other people. First off, I don’t have a spouse or children to take care of. But I also don’t own a TV and I don’t get the internet at home. I spend my workdays at a computer and don’t want to spend my evenings there too. I read, at least a little bit, every day.  If my friends cancel plans, I always have a book waiting for me at home. 

 

Wanda's reading chart month by month. Read more->

 

Wanda's reading challenges year by year. Read more->

 

 

You seem to be a fan of reading lists.  You’re reading the NPR sci-fi & fantasy list—can you tell us more about your favourite books in the genre?

 

I have always been a fan of fantasy and over the last couple of years I have discovered urban fantasy. I adore any books that have Fae/Fairy characters! I love the Hidden Legacy series by Ilona Andrews, as well as their Kate Daniels and Innkeeper Chronicles series. I’m a big fan of Seanan McGuire, especially her October Daye and InCryptid series.  I’d have to include Patricia Briggs and her Mercy Thompson and Alpha & Omega books. Faith Hunter’s Jane Yellowrock series. The Invisible Library series by Genevieve CogmanBen Aaronovitch's Rivers of London series. Suzanne McLeod’s Spellcrackers.com series.  I’m all about the magic, vampires, werewolves, fae, all that fun stuff.

 

Your bookshelf is very organized with the thematic shelves and yearly challenges.  Does the shelf reflect your personality?

 

More that I’d actually like to admit! I don’t really believe in astrology, but I’m a Virgo and they are reputedly very organized, detail oriented, and practical. In Oriental astrology, I’m an Ox.  Ox people are workers—we work for fun.  Put those two together and I’m willing to work at being organized and efficient, even at my hobby of reading.  Also, I have so many books that I’ve read or want to read that I have to maintain good shelves, or I couldn’t find them.

 

Wanda's reviewed books bookshelf

 

What are your three favourite book covers?

 

Aren’t these three pretty?  I haven’t read them yet, but I will just because the covers are so gorgeous!

 

Wild Beauty - Anna-Marie McLemoreSweetpea - C.J. SkuseThe Gallery of Lost Species - Nina Berkhout

 

 

Which books are you most excited to recommend to your followers this winter?

 

In the year ahead, I’m looking forward exploring the work of Holly Black.  She has a new book coming out called The Cruel Prince. Another book I’m anticipating is An Enchantment of Ravens by Margaret Rogerson. I’m also really excited to read Genevieve Cogman’s latest installment in the Invisible Library series, The Lost Plot

 

The Cruel Prince - Holly BlackAn Enchantment of Ravens - Margaret RogersonThe Lost Plot - Genevieve Cogman

 

There are also two new offerings in the Hogarth Shakespeare series, Dunbar by Edward St. Aubyn and Macbeth by Jo Nesbø. There are so many exciting new books being published that it’s hard to choose. 

 

Dunbar (Hogarth Shakespeare) - Edward St. AubynMacbeth - Jo Nesbø

 

What’s your reading spot?  We’d love to see the photos.  

 

I usually read in my living room, in a recliner where I can put my feet up.  I have my trusty tray beside me for the cup of coffee or glass of wine necessary and I have my wonderful new blanket (but I have to be careful of it—it tends to put me right to sleep and I don’t get much reading done that way).

 

 

A paper book or an e-book?

 

So far, I just read paper books. But I can see where an e-book reader would be handy.  One of these days I will have to learn how to deal with this technology!

 

Three titles for a boring social party?

 

If it’s boring, don’t linger there! Just head for home & your book nook!

 

A book that changed your life?

 

The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo - Stieg LarssonWould you believe that The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo by Stieg Larsson changed my life? I used to read a lot of books with my mom. We would both read them & discuss them, our own little book club. When she & my dad were killed in a car crash, I pretty much quit reading because I couldn’t talk books with her anymore.  It was ten years later when a coworker lent me The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo (which I whipped through in 2 days) that I realized how much I missed reading. I lost a lot of reading time that I’m still making up for, but I am enjoying it even more now. Now I have BookLikes friends to discuss things with. 

 

Favourite quote?

 

“The man who does not read has no advantage over the man who cannot read.” - Mark Twain

 

 

 

If you could meet one literary character, who would it be?

 

Jane Jameson, the children’s librarian turned vampire, from Molly Harper’s Jane Jameson series.  She has a snarky sense of humour, she owns a great bookstore, plus she has a great friend, another vampire called Dick Cheney, whose antics amuse me.  I’d love to attend the book club meetings at her store.

 

Shelfie time!  Please share your home library photos. 

 

I didn’t get a picture taken before I decorated for Christmas.  So you can also see my growing Christmas penguin colony!

 

 

Thank you!

 

*

 

Missed previous Follow Friday talks? Use ffwithbookbloggers tag or click the catch up links:

 

#18 Follow Friday with book bloggers: Leigha's Little Library ->

#17 Follow Friday with book bloggers: Lost Girls Reviews -> 

#16 Follow Friday with book bloggers: OBSESSION WITH WORDS ->

#15 Follow Friday with book bloggers: Bookish thoughts!!! ->

 

You can nominate your blogger friends to the Follow Friday interview! Click here and leave the URL address in the comment section.

 

 

See you next Friday! 

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text 2017-12-07 15:30
Interview: Shyla Colt (Witch for Hire) ~ Giveaway/Excerpt

 

Hello and Welcome All!

 

Today I’m very lucky to be interviewing the Author for a Witch for Hire, Shyla Colt.

 

Welcome Shyla. 

 

How did you come up with the idea for this story? It started with the two characters, Louella & Cristobal and the question, What happens if a witch and a vampire fall in love despite the way society looks down on their union? From there it grew until I had a complete universe.

 

Please share a few fun facts about this book… The main couple are a witch and vampire in love, when then they aren’t in like. It features some of my favorite historical figures suspected of being vampires.

 

Please share the opening lines from a Witch for Hire…. I’ll be eating crow until I’m shitting black feathers. The space that had once been alive with bright, colorful bobbles, herbal remedies, and homemade beauty supplies, is now a sad, barren wasteland. Bright yellow ‘Everything Must Go’ signs mock me.

 

Tell us all about your main characters — Who are they? What makes them tick?

 

Louella Eschete is a modern day witch, bound by the rules, restrictions, and responsibilities that come with her magical family. Heir to the magical throne, a position she never wanted, the sassy, smart-mouthed-witch is determined to pull her family out of the dark ages and prepare them for the storm brewing among the supernatural community.

 

Cristobal Cortez is the worst kind of dangerous. Beautiful and charming, he hides the savagery that comes so easily to him. The 15th century Spaniard has fast become a power house among the vampire community. His hasty actions nearly cost him his boundmate. Only a rash of murders that need solving have them orbiting the same universe once more. He’ll have to prove himself as they come together for the greater good. Loyal, ruthless when it comes to protection , Cristobal is an mix of Old Warm Charm and calculated moves.

 

If you could have given your characters one piece of advice before the opening pages of this book, what would it be and why? Get your heads out of your behinds, be open with one another, and be realistic about what the future holds.

 

Tell us a little about yourself? I love a good story, nice scotch, music of all kind, and most things crafty. When I’m not writing, you can find me spending time with my family, traveling any time I can fit it in, and baking , especially now that it’s fall.

 

What do you do when you are not writing? Anything crafty, travel, keep my house from burning down, lol. You know how the mom life can be.

 

What types of scenes are your most favorite to write? I really enjoy writing scenes laced with humor, and the romantic scenes where the characters are just starting to fall for once another.

 

What are your current projects? I’m working on the follow up to Witch for Hire, and a Contemporary Romance called Ring of Fire.

 

If you could swap lives with the heroine of any urban fantasy book, which book would you choose? Kitty Norville from the Kitty Norville series. She’s a midnight DJ which I’d love to be, and I found her to be hilarious and relatable.

 

Thank you very much for taking the time out of your busy schedule to take part in this interview.

 

 

 

Witch for Hire

 

Shyla Colt 

 

Genre: Urban Fantasy

 

Publisher: Vamptasy

 

Date of Publication:  11-27-2017

 

ASIN: B075GN5Q68

 

Number of pages: 300

 

Word Count: 85,000

 

Cover Artist: Dreams 2 Media

 

Tagline: Against the approaching darkness, I am the light.

 

Book Description:

 

Young, terrified, and bound to a vampire, Louella Eschete fled the bayou and swore off magic. Years later, she’s returned to the tiny town of Cypress, Louisiana to take her rightful place as head of her magical family, whether she likes it or not.

 

In order to keep the tentative peace formed between the various races of powerful beings who rule side by side, she must face her own demons. Mainly one, Cristobal Cortez.

 

Now a master vampire, and lord of the seven cities surrounding New Orleans, her former lover has moved up in the world. Their relationship gets way more complicated when his court is framed for a rash of murders they didn’t commit.

 

Forced to play her role as his bond mate, and launch an investigation into the darkness threatening to overturn truces, she may be in over her head.

 

 

Amazon

 

 

I spot his form on the outskirts. Though, I’m loathe to admit it, my night vision is better than a human’s. Energy crackles on my fingertips. Bright green sparks break the inky blackness of night. My stomach sours. Being in the same space works as an amplifier for us. I’m manifesting new powers. He’s turned me into something foreign. Physical manifestation of magic is rare and left to the most powerful.

 

I curl my hands into fists. He foresaw this all those years ago in that graveyard. He recognized the potential of the two of us could create together. My chest aches. Some wounds cut too deep to ever fully heal. Angers pools in my belly. I wanted love. I got lies and manipulation instead. A pulsing ball of energy forms in front of me. I’m hypnotized by the technic-color glow. How could this come from me?

 

I shake under the strain of maintaining it. What was created in anger is burning off my reserves.

 

“Let. It. Go.”

 

The command given in a dulcet tone snaps my hold on the newly discovered power. The ball hurtles toward him. I resend the magic, knowing the back lash of the abrupt interruption of signal flow is going to be a bitch. Lifted off my feet by a form of magical feedback, I’m pitched back violently. My stomach drops, and then I’m caught in a strong pair of arms. The gravity of seeing him in person so close up presses down on me as I drown in his chocolate colored gaze. My tongue sticks to the rough of my mouth. All thought flees as my barriers buckle like the compromised hull of a ship. The high, well-sculpted cheek bones lead down to a strong, diamond shaped jaw rounded out by a dimpled chin. His button nose gives an eternal boyish quality to his rugged good lucks. He swallows and my gaze is drawn to his throat as my mind his worked over by years of memories.

 

We’re exchanging information like two computers updating. He cups my face. “Louella.” I twitch as I ride the wave of power being exchanged between us. 

 

 

 

Tour Giveaway 

Kindle Fire (US and Canada Only for the giveaway)

$25 Amazon GC

$25 Amazon GC

$10 Amazon GC

 

a Rafflecopter giveaway

 

 

Shyla Colt is the sassy international bestseller of the popular series Kings of Chaos and Dueling Devils M.C. This genre-hoppers stories feature three of her favorite things: strong females, pop culture, and alternate routes to happy ever after. Listening to her Romani soul, she pens from the heart, allowing the dynamic characters, eccentric interests, and travels as a former flight attendant to take her down untraveled roads. 

 

Born and raised in Cincinnati, Ohio, this mid-west girl is proud of her roots. She used her hometown and the surrounding areas as a backdrop for a number of books. So, if you’re a Buckeye, keep an eye out for familiar places. 

 

As a full-time writer, stay at home mother, and wife, there’s never a dull moment in her household.

 

She weaves her tales in spare moments and the evenings with a cup of coffee or tea at her side and the characters in her head for company.

 

You can interact with Shyla Colt online via her website, TwitterFacebook, & Goodreads.

 

 

Source: angelsguiltypleasures.com/2017/12/interview-shyla-colt-witch-for-hire-giveawayexcerpt
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text 2017-12-05 16:26
Interview at The Writing Desk

Tony Riches has interviewed me for his blog today. Check it out.  :-)

Source: tonyriches.blogspot.co.uk/2017/12/special-guest-interview-with-author_5.html
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text 2017-12-05 15:07
Mark A. Rayner about his newest novel The Fatness + Giveaway [A guest post]

 

Many of you already know Mark A. Rayner aka Dilettante (you can follow Mark's blog on BookLikes here). Now it's time to know Mark's story a little bit better. With his new release The Fatness Mark also reveals a look behind the scenes of his newest book!

 

If you're hungry of great stories, make sure to request The Fatness copy in here. Enjoy and bon appetite

 

 

-- a guest post by Mark A. Rayner

 

 

The Fatness – a novel of epic portions

 

Canadian author Mark A. Rayner’s timely new book, The Fatness, is a satirical take on how not to deal with the so-called obesity “epidemic”. The novel posits a world in which the government gives those who are obese a simple choice: relinquish their publicly funded healthcare or go to a special Calorie Reduction Center (CRC) to lose the weight.

Mark is offering three copies as a giveaway here.

 

 

Behind the scenes:

why The Fatness was a difficult book to write

by Mark A. Rayner

 

It was personal.

 

Writers might say that of any book, true, but this novel was a particular challenge. I’ve struggled with weight issues most of my life, so I found it quite difficult to write a humorous account of what it would be like to be imprisoned for your weight.

 

Really difficult.

 

Like many of my novels, the idea for The Fatness first came to me in a dream. I’d been reading The Obesity Myth, by Paul Campos. It’s an eye-opening non-fiction about the bad science surrounding the idea of the obesity “epidemic”. That was sometime in 2005, the year ENC Press published my first book, The Amadeus Net.

 

In the nightmare, I was imprisoned in a Calorie Reduction Center, a concentration camp for the obese. When I awoke, I thought, so that’s a horrible notion. Terrifying. And strangely compelling. Should I even put this terrible idea out in the world? I wondered. Would readers know it was meant to be a satire?

 

I’m an optimist, so I wrote four chapters. They were bad. There was nothing funny about the book. It wasn’t biting satire, it was just bitter.

 

I made several other attempts, all failures. Six years ago I even got as far as completing an outline and a large chunk of a draft. But it wasn’t really what I wanted the book to be. It was strained and really not funny in a way that was compassionate for the inmates of the Calorie Reduction Centers.

 

Then five years ago I got serious about my own weight issues. I worked with two wonderful personal trainers and got my BMI – my body mass index – down below the dreaded 30 BMI for the first time in years. For some reason, that gave me the ability to write the book. I think I needed to understand the process of losing weight so that I could communicate its challenges properly. Within the course of a year, I wrote a completely new draft of the book.

Giveaway 

Ends December 18, 2017

REQUEST YOUR COPY ->

 

The biggest task, from a writing perspective, was to get the tone right. I didn’t want this to be an exercise in telling fat jokes. That is part of the problem, as far as I see it – we tolerate jokes about somebody’s weight in a way that we wouldn’t allow for other characteristics, such as race or sexuality. So pitching the humor in a compassionate way was important to me.

 

I think I learned how to do it by reading the work of Kurt Vonnegut, one of my literary heroes. I share his take on humanity. We are flawed, but we’re not worthless. It’s the opposite, really. Our flaws make us different, and our differences make us valuable.

 

A satire also has to be critical. Another way in which my writing is similar to Vonnegut’s is that we make fun of pretension and large-scale human systems. We’re suspicious of both. Pretension is a symptom of hypocrisy. This pitfall is only possible when we humans start believing our own lies.

 

The other major target, as far as I can see, has to be the way that humans are terrible at taking good ideas and turning them into governing principles. The human component seems to get lost as soon as we scale things up to the level of large systems.

 

Obesity is a complicated problem, and it’s not realistic to think we’re going to find simple solutions. There’s a genetic component to obesity – recent studies indicate it may be caused by a single gene. There are societal, financial and emotional components to it as well. Until we understand how all of these things fit together, it’s going to be a difficult issue to address. Blaming people for their weight issues is certainly not going to help.

 

After I got my own weight problems under control (for a little while) and finished the rough draft of the book, the following year I worked with my editor and produced two more drafts. Then my life got really complicated. My long-term relationship ended, my dog died, and I started a new and extremely challenging work position. (Sounds like a bad country and western song, doesn’t it?) So it took a few more years until I was ready to start the publishing process. Yeah, sometimes it takes that long.

 

This twelve-year project, from idea to publication, is the longest gestation period for a book I’ve written. By comparison, my first novel, The Amadeus Net, was a breeze – it only took ten years from start to finish.

 

But I think The Fatness is the best book I’ve written (so far), and the positive reviews seem to back up that feeling. I’m particularly pleased that readers feel the book is satirical, yet has a big heart that is compassionate for people struggling with obesity.

 

As the reading and writing process taught me, there are no easy answers.

 

Mark’s favourite writing space: in the garden.

 

 

The Fatness is a metaphor

 

I hope this is a story that can be read on many levels and enjoyed in different ways. I don’t think this is a spoiler, but it’s fair to say that there is a metaphor at the heart of this book.

 

If you buy into the notion of duality, you accept the idea that you are a consciousness riding around in a body. I think many fat people experience this every time they look in the mirror. I know I do. I don’t feel overweight, but there’s the proof of it right there in front of me. The idea that you might be physically incarcerated because of your body is a metaphor for how an obese person might feel every day: a thin person looking out at a fat one. That’s a paraphrase of the Cyril Connolly quotation: “Imprisoned in every fat man a thin one is wildly signaling to be let out.”

 

There’s some truth to it, in the same way that as we get older, we may experience the truth of Terry Pratchett’s observation: “Inside every old person is a young person wondering what the hell happened.”

 

But the thing is, that thin person, that young person, is a reflection of societal values. If you engage with any media, it’s impossible to avoid the idea that what matters is being thin, being young, being beautiful, being successful, and being famous. We see ourselves that way – we judge ourselves that way – even when these ideas have nothing to do with our worth as human beings.

 

The Fatness is an attempt to get people to recognize how media can have an impact on how we see ourselves and each other.

 

So my hope is that readers will be affected by the book. My hope, if they’re fat, is for them to feel less alone, to feel less guilty about their physicality. For the non-obese, I hope they get an understanding that nobody wants to be fat. It’s not a choice. And it’s not just laziness. Many fat people spend their entire lives trying not to be fat. I know that I have.

 

On a lighter note (pun intended), my goal is to make readers laugh. There are lots of things the book spoofs, and your political affiliations really don’t matter. Every reader will find something to enjoy. It makes fun of socialism. It makes fun of capitalism. And it makes fun of human foibles.

 

If nothing else, readers should come away with a sense of how absurd our bureaucracies can be, and how even the best intentions can go wildly astray. Even science.

 

 

Discovering more about medical science

 

I learned quite a bit while I was penning this novel. While the facts, myths, and quotes between the chapters – I call them ‘interstitials’ – are meant to be fun, they actually helped me discover more about obesity, body image, and the research process. I learned, for example, that science is very much a human process, prone to error and flaws. What we “know” today could easily turn out to be “wrong” the next. A tragic example of this is what happened in the ’50s and ’60s, when the medical profession decided that dietary fat was the enemy.

 

Ironically, I think this is one of the major contributing factors to the increase of obesity in society. This is terribly simplistic, but we substituted carbs for fat in our diets – and not just good carbs, like vegetables and fruits. We added in highly processed carbs, which are probably okay for us in limited amounts, but not if they make up the bulk of our diet.

 

I also learned how the food industry works. (It’s kind of shocking, in some cases.) I certainly didn’t realize that corporations were actively pushing unhealthy food at us to fatten up their bottom line. That probably makes me seem naive, but until I started digging into the subject, I really hadn’t thought about it much.

 

I learned about the importance of body image – on both sides of the BMI. I learned how damaging it is to shame people for being either too fat or too thin. Even if the intention is to help people become healthier, shame is actually counterproductive when it comes to weight management.

 

Finally, I discovered that keeping the weight off is just as hard as losing it. But that’s a topic for a sequel. (And maybe a psychotherapist.)

 

About Mark A. Rayner

 

Mark A. Rayner. Author. Mustache twirler. Photo by David Redding Photography, 2013.

 

Human-shaped, simian-obsessed, robot-fighting, pirate-hearted, storytelling junkie Mark A. Rayner is an award-winning writer of satirical and speculative fiction.

 

By day, Mark teaches his bemused students at the Faculty of Information and Media Studies (at Western University) how to construct social media campaigns and viable information architectures that will not become self-aware and destroy all humans. By night he is a writer of short stories, novels, squibs and other drivel. (Some pure, and some quite tainted with meaning.)

 

Many cheeseburgers were harmed in the making of this novel.

 

Mark A. Rayner's books:

 

The Fatness - Mark A. Rayner The Amadeus Net - Mark A. Rayner The Fridgularity - Mark A. Rayner

Marvellous Hairy - Mark A. Rayner Pirate Therapy and Other Cures - Mark A. Rayner The Meanderings of the Emily Chesley Reading Circle - Mark A. Rayner 

 

 

Follow Mark's blog on BookLikes

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text 2017-12-01 14:05
Featured Friday: Fillius Glint by Ditrie Marie Bowie with Excerpt and Interview

 

Today for “Feature Friday” let us welcome the wonderful Ditrie Marie Bowie and her book Fillius Glint.

We will have info about the book and author, agreat excerpt of the book and a interview with Ditrie Marie.

Make sure to check everything out and go and show her some love and add the book to your TBR ;) 

Happy Reading :) 

 


 

35156081

 

When you are an adult, living with your parents can be awkward. All Nigel Iffik wants is one quiet night alone with his hand. Instead, he unwittingly unleashes a malicious virus which infects his entire family's network of electronics and Universe Growers. Trillions of sentient beings succumb to destruction as his sister, Nancy, scrambles to undo the damage to her mostly unprotected Universe Grower. Will the anti-viral protocols stop the digital onslaught in time?

Follow four residents of one such endangered universe as they chomp tacos, battle the absurd, and uncover a secret that will change their lives forever.

 

 

goodreads-badge-add-plus-

 

 

Buy Links

 

 

 

This dream was boring. Instead of battling fire-breathing dragons or taming ninja rats, I was standing around waiting for something to happen. I mean, come on. Elder Boya was here, too, even though he’d died five years ago. And Dream Boya wasn’t a paragon of action-adventure, either.

Just. Standing.

We were stuck in the center of my village— a patch of dust ringed by straw-thatched huts. I ran past the taco trees that bordered the village, but the dream plopped me right back in the center whenever I closed in on freedom.

Screw this, I was sick of standing. I sat down on the ground in a huff.

Dream Boya wore blue ceremonial robes that fluttered in a wind I couldn’t feel. His white beard had been combed and threaded into intricate braids. I wondered what the special occasion was.

Other elders were behind him, but they weren’t real people— more like formless shadows. A crowd thrummed behind me, but I couldn’t turn my head to watch them.

Dreams were weird.

Bored, I reached into my pouch for a bauble. But there was nothing there. Frantic, I patted the ground all around me. The satchel was nowhere to be found. Irritated, I scratched my nose. That bag wasn’t only my livelihood— it was the sign of my office. A smetoriya wasn’t complete without one.

I glared at the others in the dreamscape. Had one of the shadows stolen my pouch? I saw the marking staff in Dream Boya’s hand, the knots and whorls of its wood as ancient as my people. That’s when everything clicked into place. In this dream, I hadn’t been made a smetoriya yet. Not officially.

Without warning, the dream world hushed. It was a silence that rattled my bones.

Boya spoke. “It is your eighteenth spring, Calliya Tregoriya. The time has come. You must stand before the people and be marked. Guardian watch over us as we celebrate, the elements witness this day. Did you complete the poros wreath?”

Glancing down, I saw a wreath resting in my palms. It looked like the one I had woven for the real ceremony: tiny leaves and delicate white petals intertwined in an elaborate braid. The main difference was this one glowed like something out of the Spiritwait. Shuddering, I stood up and passed it to Dream Boya. He accepted the gift with a slight bow of his head. A ghostly wind tousled his robes, but the breeze didn’t touch me.

A creeping unease rushed down my shoulders. Air was one of my elements to call; I should at least be able to sense it moving.

The errant wind blew over the poros wreath, crumbling it to dust in Dream Boya’s hand. “It’s gone.” He whispered, his rheumy eyes brimming with confusion. “Gone.” He threaded knobby fingers through the braids of his beard, tugging in frustration. “Ill omen. Ill portent. Oh, woe be unto all who stand witness here this day.” The marking staff drooped and darkened, writhing in his grasp; Elder Boya’s face twisted in tormented anger.

At least the dream was getting interesting.

“Two cycles did I train you, Calliya Tregoriya. Three more cycles did I guide you through the wilderness. Why did you abandon me to the dust?”

Whoa, now. Abandon was a harsh word. Thanks to old age, Elder Boya had met his dust without any input from me. After he passed, I had bound his body to the elements and freed his soul to the Spiritwait. I had done my part. Dream Boya needed to chill the snarks down.

The marking staff leaped out of his hand and slithered to the ground. The weird wind strengthened and inflated Boya to twice his size. “You have forsaken me! You have been marked! You shall be marked!” The staff snaked its way toward me, but I couldn’t move my legs to dodge out of the way. It wrapped itself around my ankles, cramming them together. I lost my balance and crumpled to the soil.

This was seriously uncool. But wait, it got better.

The snarking staff bit me, sending a sharp pain up my legs followed by an indescribable chill. A thick liquid clotted my veins and tightened my jaw.

Poisoned. Paralyzed. This was the worst dream ever.

Dream Boya leaned over me, his features subtly shifting. Tan and weathered skin became smooth and waxy white. Dark, heavy-lidded eyes brightened and changed into large yellow spheres with nictating membranes. The Crenosiyo sage transformed into the Guardian-cursed demon, Qorxu.

Even though I knew this was a dream, a surge of fear shook my soul as the devil leered over me, came close and closer. My spirit screamed, but no sound came out; my mouth was petrified into silence.

Gasping, I awoke to the sounds of the forest. My heart beat a wild rhythm against its bony cage.

Worst. Dream. Ever.

 

 

 

Hello Ditrie Marie. Thank you for taking the time to stop in and chat with us, it is great to have you.

 

What was the best money you ever spent as a writer?

That's a great question. I hate spending money on anything; it makes me terribly anxious. But I'm really glad I invested in copies of Vellum and Scrivener. 

What author, dead or alive would you love to co-write with and why?

Terry Pratchett, hands down. His writing was deliciously punny, and I find myself leaning heavily on that comedic fantasy style.

What is your writing Kryptonite? 

Anxiety and self-doubt. Nothing will kill a story faster.

Do you try more to be original or to deliver to readers what they want?

I don't know how original it is, but I am myself. I write the stories that I enjoy reading. And I'm a weird, quirky little person. So, if nothing else, I write for all the weirdos out there like me.

What was an early experience where you learned that language had power?

Words have had incredible power in my life for as long as I can remember. I grew up in a bilingual household. My mother would often tell us stories or play story-making games with my brother and me when we were little. And no matter which language she's speaking at the time, my mother has an admirable ability to spin stories in an engaging and captivating way. She can tell me about someone walking down the street and make it feel like I'm reading a mystery thriller or a comedy depending on how she spins it. It's pretty amazing.

 

This was fun, again thank you so much for taking the time to chat. You rock!

 

 

Ditrie Marie Bowie

 

Ditrie Marie Bowie (née Sanchez) is a Puerto Rican in British Columbia, Canada who writes fiction. She is a member of the Alliance of Independent Authors (ALLi)and co-editor of Strange Stories to Tell in the Park. Bowie is also the creator of the webcomic, This Writer Can’t Draw. A classically trained pianist and former educator, she has lived in three different countries spanning two continents. And she met her spouse in a video game.

 

Links

 

Website *** Facebook *** Twitter *** Instagram *** Pinterest 

 

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