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quote 2019-01-24 23:30
"On the train, I watch strangers' eyes, studying the wrinkles that curl from them like script, like talons. How much squinting, how much laughter to earn each of those lines?"
Tell the Machine Goodnight - Katie Williams

Goodnight, Machine

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review 2019-01-24 23:29
Review - Tell the Machine Goodnight
Tell the Machine Goodnight - Katie Williams

Goodnight, Machine

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review 2019-01-24 01:34
Hard to put down, love these Scots in the present and past.
Katie's Highlander - Maeve Greyson

I did not want to stop reading this story! I loved Katie's strength of character with her natural sweetness and caring personality. She could not leave someone in need. Ramsay was a gruff yet gentle man, carrying the burdens of the family secrets and a bad past relationship. It was interesting how these two figured out what was the right thing to do. There were smiles, giggles, and tears as I turned these pages. I highly recommend this story.

I received an ARC through Netgalley, and this is my unsolicited review.

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review 2019-01-01 15:16
The Tea Dragon Society - Katie O'Neill
For more reviews, check out my blog: Craft-Cycle

Such a beautiful book. Strangely enough, I actually started reading this online over X-mas. I had finished the first chapter (and was loving it) when I found a physical copy at the library. I really enjoyed reading it and the huge pages of the physical book really allow you to get lost in the amazing world of tea dragons.

The thing that really stood out in this book was the artwork. It is all so beautiful and adorable. I absolutely loved it. I also liked the story, although I can see it not appealing to everyone. It is more about personal journeys than physical adventures. I found it well done and the characters really pull you in. 

At the end of the book are some Extracts from the Tea Dragon Handbook, which include information about tea dragons, their societies, and the leaves produced by tea dragons. There is also some information on eight tea dragons such as average length, average weight, and care notes as well as a super cute picture of each (Hibiscus is my absolute fav. I can't help it. She looks like a less cranky version of my cat). 

I would definitely like to read more by O'Neill. I have read Princess Princess Ever After and loved it! One of the things I really like about her work is the diversity she so seemlessly includes. Some books try hard to incorporate diverse characters, but it feels forced and more like, "Look, there is a lesbian!" O'Neill has a knack for creating three-dimensional characters that feel like actual people rather than plot devices. By not being so in-your-face and just presenting the characters as they are, sexualities are represented as natural and normal. 

I am loving the world of tea dragons. I cannot wait to read The Tea Dragon Festival. This was a wonderful book to finish up 2018. 
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review 2018-12-10 02:02
The Tea Dragon Society (graphic novel) by Katie O'Neill
The Tea Dragon Society - Katie O'Neill

Greta is the daughter of a female blacksmith and has grown up learning her mother's craft. One day, she saves a Jasmine tea dragon. The dragon's caretaker, Hesekiel, offers to teach her about caring for tea dragons. Each dragon has its quirks, but, when properly cared for, they produce magnificent tea that carries the memories of their current caretaker. Greta's visits to Hesekiel also allow her to get to know Erik, Hesekiel's long-time friend and partner, and Minette, a shy girl who is approximately the same age as Greta and who is closely bonded to a Chamomile dragon.

I didn't realize until I had the book in my hands and saw the little blurb on the cover that this was by the same person who created Princess Princess Ever After. Thankfully, the printing for this volume was better than it was for that one - all of the artwork was bright, clear, and lovely. I'm tempted to get a copy for my own collection, even though I have no idea where I'd keep it.

The story was simple and quiet, focused on the characters' relationships and the details of tea dragon care. The most action-filled moment was a tea-induced flashback to the beginnings of Hesekiel and Erik's relationship as

a pair of adventurers who eventually settled down for a quieter life after Erik was badly injured and ended up in wheelchair.

(spoiler show)


The entire volume dealt with things that took time and patience, from developing relationships with others to blacksmithing and tea dragon care. The inclusion of both older and younger generations worked really well in this respect. With Greta and Minette, readers could see the beginnings of a sweet and occasionally awkward relationship, while Erik and Hesekiel were a great example of a couple that had had years to get to know each other and settle into life together. There was a little of that when it came to the tea dragons as well, although that was more unbalanced. The process of establishing a relationship with a tea dragon was mostly covered in lectures, because Erik, Hesekiel, and even Minette had already gained the trust of their dragons and bonded with them fairly well.

While I wished this had been a bit longer (Minette's backstory, in particular, felt like it needed more closure), I really enjoyed this. The artwork was lovely. It wouldn't surprise me to learn that CLAMP, particularly their work Chobits, was one of O'Neill's influences - one panel featured Minette in a pose that reminded me a great deal of Chobit's Chi.

Also, the "Tea Dragon Handbook" at the end, which contained more information about various tea dragons and their care, was fabulous. I'd happily read an expanded version of it featuring even more kinds of tea dragons. I wonder what a Pu Erh dragon would look and act like?

Additional Comments:

If you're hesitant about getting this, it looks like the entire story can still be read online (minus the "Tea Dragon Handbook").

 

(Original review posted on A Library Girl's Familiar Diversions.)

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