logo
Wrong email address or username
Wrong email address or username
Incorrect verification code
back to top
Search tags: kindle
Load new posts () and activity
Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2018-06-24 04:46
The Firm
The Firm - John Grisham

This was the first book I read by John Grisham, so very many years ago. I recently re-read the book (listening wherever I could) and I felt like I was reading another book by the same author. 

 

In this story, Mitch is getting ready to graduate from Law School and he is being recruited by a firm from Nashville, TN and they offer him a lot of money and many perks to come to their firm, but the problem is that after it is announced that he has passed the bar and works for the firm, he is hunted by the FBI to help them prove the wrongdoing of the firm. He finds out that what the FBI was telling him is true and he begins to get the stuff they want together, but he will only give them what they want when he gets what he wants, including his brother being released from jail. 

 

It was interesting the intrigue, but I did feel that I had seen some of it in other books. 

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2018-06-24 04:30
Red Velvet Revenge
Red Velvet Revenge - Jenn McKinlay

Such a fun book to listen to while in the car. Yesterday was my middle child's birthday and my youngest had chosen this book to be listened to in the car while we were traveling. My husband and children laughed out loud at many moments in the book. 

 

It is a very hot summer in AZ and Gina and Mel are discussing what they should do about their dwindling clientele (too hot to come out and enjoy a cupcake). When Oz and Marty show up with an old ice cream truck to go out and find the business. They convince the girls to come out for a test drive and the van dies. While they are discussing what they should do about the broken van, Slim and his wife Tammy show up and help the crew out by giving them a ride back to the shop. As a reward for his help, they give Slim a package of cupcakes and he loves the cupcakes so much he gets the girls to commit to coming to the rodeo and selling cupcakes there. While they are there, Slim gets shot and then the "star" of the rodeo is found dead in a bullpen. Who really tried to shoot Slim and who really murdered Ty are the questions that they try to answer to save Oz from being charged with the murder. 

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
text 2018-06-24 02:41
The Baron's Blunder by Susan M. Baganz -- a blunder indeed
The Baron's Blunder (Black Diamond) - Susan M. Baganz

Disclosure:  I obtained the Kindle edition of this book when it was offered free on Amazon.  I do not know the author nor have I ever communicated with her about this book or any other matter.  I am an author of historical and contemporary romance novels and nonfiction.

 

 

That said, I am old.  And my memory is good.  And I'm originally from the Chicago area.

 

I will never be able to read this book.

 

Spring, 1808

Great Britain

 

The sun blinded him, yet a flash in the distance caught his attention. Sure enough, another robbery of a coach by some land pirate. Not again. Disgusted, Lord Charles Percy urged his mount into a gallop as he drew his pistol and cocked it. Slowing his mount and aiming true, he shot the gun out of the ruffian’s hand. The thief’s horse tossed the rider to the ground before racing away. Charles drew

Baganz, Susan M.. The Baron's Blunder (Black Diamond) (Kindle Locations 46-49). Pelican Book Group. Kindle Edition.

 

The writing isn't anything spectacular, but I will always equate the name Charles Percy with the Senator from Illinois. 

 

Names matter.

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2018-06-23 23:19
Love Mystery by Pamela Styles -- DNF
Love Mystery - Pamela Styles

Disclosure:  I obtained the Kindle edition of this book when it was offered free on Amazon.  I do not know the author nor have I ever had any communication with her about this book or any other matter.  I am an author of historical and contemporary romances and non-fiction.

 

This is one of those books that you think maybe has some potential, but the execution just wrings every last drop of hope out.

 

All it took was a paragraph.  The first paragraph.

 

A sheep was gnawing on the corner of my coat. I snatched the fabric away, causing the animal to retreat, startled. I looked up, following her direction of travel. She had re-joined her flock on the hillside where I sat looking out, allowing rain to fall on my face, plastering long, wet, gray hair to my skin. I was struggling to breathe and closed my eyes intending to rest, just for a moment…

Styles, Pamela. Love Mystery (Love Magic Book 2) (Kindle Locations 15-19). Kindle Edition.

 

Gnawing.  Causing.  Following.  Looking.  Allowing.  Plastering.  Struggling.  Intending.

 

This kind of over-reliance on present participles is the mark of an amateur writer.  Perhaps one who hasn't done a lot of reading herself.  Perhaps one who hasn't had a good critique group to help her through the process of developing a prose style.

 

Regardless the reason, it makes for a disappointing reading experience. And it only gets worse in succeeding paragraphs.

 

That disappointment is intensified with clumsy repetitions.  "Pounding" appears three times in the next couple of paragraphs.   Or this:

 

This was not the best start to my eighteenth birthday. I could hear movement outside my bedroom, surely my mother, come to rouse me to celebrate. She knocked on the door.

 

“Alexis,” she called to me through the door.

Styles, Pamela. Love Mystery (Love Magic Book 2) (Kindle Locations 23-24). Kindle Edition.

 

There's no need to write "through the door." It's just extra words that don't add anything.

 

But here's the thing that pulled me completely out of the story, far more than just the unpolished writing.

 

There's the cover, first.

 

 

 

I post it here because they get changed so frequently on Amazon. Lovely young woman, flowers, soft colors.

 

Then the opening section of the book is titled "Alexis."

 

Then the opening scene depicts a person in the rain, with long wet gray hair, which suggests that the person is a woman.

 

But in fact, "Alexis" is a young man!

 

I had already built up a mental image, based on the cover art, of Alexis as a young woman.  Even though I'd only invested the few minutes necessary to get through two or three pages, the magic was completely broken when I learned my mental image had to be completely redrawn.

 

Shelly Lowenkopf, in his 1982 article for The Writer magazine "Creating the Rejection-Resistant Novel," says a writer only has three pages at the very most to capture a reader's attention.  I was barely three Kindle pages into this book when my attention was completely thrown out of the book, not only by the weak writing but now by the false mental image I had created based on the clues the writer had left.  That was enough for me to DNF.

 

Those problems were enough, but they weren't the end of my reasons.

 

The book is supposedly set in 1869 in the U.S., but the celebration of Samhain seemed  out of place with that era and location.  I could have bought it if the author had given me some kind of context. 

 

The context is provided in the Amazon listing description, but we all know that books get withdrawn or descriptions changed, and they don't accompany the book files to the reading device.  The description also clearly states that Alexis is male.  But reading the book on my Kindle, without access to the original listing, I had no way of knowing that.

 

All in all, it was a very disappointing experience, and I'm not inclined to read any further.  This lengthy review is to give other readers a full explanation of my analysis.  I'm sure there are people who won't like that I wrote more than I read, but that's just too bad.

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review SPOILER ALERT! 2018-06-23 18:49
Star Wars: The Last Jedi, by Jason Fry
The Last Jedi (Star Wars) - Jason Fry

Almost forgot to review this! Like the novelization of The Force Awakens, The Last Jedi was mostly worthwhile in terms of the additional context and peek inside characters' heads not offered in the film. However, I had even more questions about TLJ from the movie than I had for TFA. I also had not re-watched it yet. Moments I thought were not in the film were indeed in there when I eventually re-watched; I was so off in my head through TLJ, I missed a lot!

 

The most interesting new bits in the novel that I remember from my reading include details about General Hux's background and those of his fellow First Order officers. Apparently, Hux's father was also a military man but was crazy; Hux killed him (it's not revealed how)--it remains dangerous business being a father to a son in the Star Wars universe! Seriously, it's like being a Roman Caesar. In the film you can see Hux clash with other officers, but the novel clarifies that a few of them also served the Empire; they're used to doing things a certain way. Hux favors shows of strength rather than utilizing successful strategy.

 

Some additional scenes were filmed but not part of the final cut (available as deleted scenes in special features) and are described in the novel. These include a serious-turned-funny sequence where Luke tells Rey that newly arriving Caretaker species merchants are raiders who come regularly to steal and kill. Rey rushes down to them only to discover that they're having a party! Luke lied to make a point about how the Jedi would have taken a no-involvement stance. Something not filmed, though, is Luke inviting Rey to dance; it's sweet scene.

 

The biggest questions I had after seeing the film the first time involved Kylo Ren and Rey, of course. It somehow wasn't clear to me on a first viewing if Ren knew anything about Snoke forming the Force bond between him and Rey; he didn't. I also wondered if Snoke was telling the truth about that. In the book, before and during his monologue that ends with his death, we get a glimpse of Snoke's thoughts, and he did indeed bridge their minds (at least HE believes he did). There's also more about the fight from Rey's perspective especially; at the beginning she struggles a bit but essentially lets the Force guide her. It's pretty cool. She also senses Ben/Kylo as he fights and compares him to an animal finally freed from his cage.

 

Most revealing is why Rey leaves Ren alive once it's clear he's not going to turn and they struggle over Luke's light saber, which splits and knocks them unconscious. He wakes up, but Rey is already gone in the movie. In the book, there's a little scene where Rey awakens and contemplates what to do. She feels that the Force isn't done with Ren, and it's not her place to kill him.

 

There's also more about Rose and her sister, which helped me appreciate her more as a character. There's a bit more romantic tension between her and Finn, from her perspective at least, as she's annoyed each time he thinks only of Rey, not the larger cause.

 

And we get more about and from Leia, including her Force training and that moment where she and Ben sense each other as his ship is set to fire on hers. The thing that prevents him from killing her is that what he senses from her is worry--for him, not herself. My heart hurts; excuse me while I go cry over Carrie Fisher again.

More posts
Your Dashboard view:
Need help?