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review 2018-12-25 16:39
The Guide for the Perplexed
The Guide for the Perplexed - Moses Maimonides

Looking to reconcile Aristotelian philosophy and Jewish theology, Moses Maimonides wrote The Guide for the Perplexed. A three part letter to his student, the book was influential not only to  Jewish thought but Christian and Islamic thought throughout the Middle Ages while still giving those in the 21st Century insights to consider.

 

The first part focuses on Maimonides arguing against the anthropomorphism of God, basically stating God is incorporeal, and all references in the Bible to God doing physical things are essentially figurative language to allow the human mind to understand the works of God.  This leads into a discussion by Maimonides that states that God cannot be described in positive terms only negative conceptions because while positive terms put limits on God, the negative does not.  This leads into a discussion of philosophy and mysticism of various kinds.  The second part begins on Maimonides expounding on the physical structure of the universe, an essentially Aristotelian world-view, which eventually leads into a debate on if the universe is eternal or created.  Though Maimonides admits that Aristotle’s arguments for an eternal universe are better, Divine Revelation decides the matter.  Maimonides then expounds on the Creation presented in Genesis and theories on the possible end of the world.  The last part is explained as the climax of the whole work as Maimonides expounds on the mystical passage of the Chariot found in Ezekiel, which isn’t supposed to be directly taught only hinted at though over time direct instruction has become the normal.  This is followed by analysis of the moral aspects of the universe and explaining the reasons for the 613 laws in the Torah.  Maimonides ends the book with how God is worshipped correctly, through wisdom.

 

The comparison of and thesis of complimenting of long held Jewish theological thought and Aristotelian philosophy by Maimonides could have been hard to follow, the text was more than readable and thus the arguments very understandable.  While his arguments and logic are insight and enlightening, Maimonides is yet another religious individual who has married ‘pagan’ philosophy with divine revelation to the determinant of the latter like many of his Christian contemporaries were doing and their predecessors before them and many would do after.  This is the book’s biggest flaw, but instead of being a reason not to read it is the main one to read it and thus understand the arguments of those who want to merge two separate worldviews into one.

 

The Guide for the Perplexed was intended by Maimonides for learned individuals to give his view on philosophy more than theology, however the two could not be connected within the text.  While I do not adhere to the vast majority of the thoughts the author expounded upon, the insight into medieval thought were invaluable and insightful.

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review 2017-02-16 04:50
A Stalled Ox by Dean Moses
A Stalled Ox (1888: Novellas) - Dean Mos... A Stalled Ox (1888: Novellas) - Dean Moses

DISCLAIMER: I received this book in exchange for an honest review. All opinions herein are of my own.

Title: A Stalled Ox
Author: +Dean Moses
Pages: 120
Publisher: Black Hill Press
Release date: November 11, 2015.

Review:
The unthinkable has happened. In a world where meat is non-existent, people have turned to religion to help save them from what they believe to be the end of the world. Agent Howard and his partner Linda to go undercover to a compound where a man who calls himself by the name of "God" is claiming he has found a way to serve his followers meat.

In such a short novella, Agent Howard, Linda, and "God" are well-thought out characters. Linda and "God" have background stories that are summed up in a few paragraphs and they are told perfectly. "God" is a very calculating character, and has so much more inside of him than what is presented in the story. He is cold, unpredictable, yet even I was drawn in by him. His story comes with a ton of surprises as well. This novella has horror, passion, and exciting turns of events you'll be captivated by. By the end, you'll be left with questions and wanting even more.

This book is perfect for readers who like shorter novels, but still appreciate amazing writing. The fact that this is a novella doesn't mean it doesn't pack the punch a longer book does. I found myself flinching at the gore found within its 120 pages and was scared numb by the imagery Moses formed inside my mind with his writing.

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review 2016-11-30 18:13
The Law of Moses
The Law of Moses - Amy Harmon

I tried to figure out why it took me days to read this novel and the only reason I can think of, was the holidays. I tried to read it over Thanksgiving but there was so much going on. The characters were never far from my mind as I kept thinking of Moses and how his ability to paint was controlling his life. I haven’t read a novel by Amy Harmon in a while so I grabbed this one at the library and after reading the first couple pages I know why I enjoy her writing. Amy pulls you in immediately into her world with her pace and characters that have captivating pasts and intriguing stories. There are always twists in her novels; things that I never see coming and her storylines to me are different. I never know upon reading the synopsis how the story is going to play out, for they are vague but I know Amy’s writings so I realize that I will stumble upon distinct characters and a special and unusual storyline that I will not forget.

He was left in a basket at a Laundromat only moments after his birth for she preferred drugs over being a mother. She was found dead just a few days later. They named this child Moses and he’s passed around to all his remaining living relatives as he is just too much for one person to handle. His great grandmother, a good woman who seems to know how to handle him, usually has him over the summer but she is up in years so the other relatives pass him around during the rest of the year. This goes on for all of Moses childhood. It is Moses’ senior year and his great grandmother is allowed to keep him for the year. There is some religion in this novel as great grandma is a religious woman who I adored very much. She finds work for Moses as a farmhand on a nearby horse ranch where their horses work with individuals who are troubled. Individuals in the town know of Moses’ rough past and there are people who have already formed their own opinion of him. On the ranch, Georgia also knows of Moses and her father has told her to keep away from him. With her future planned out, Georgia tries to keep her distance from Moses but circumstances have them together more often than not. Moses has a talent, a talent that seems to be getting him in trouble but the need is too great inside him to stop. Moses is a painter, what he paints is not typical but he has no control over it over what he must express. An artist must reveal what he feels and sees, so Moses paints. I loved the depth that his painting revealed, the mystery and the emotion that followed his art. The relationships with the individuals that Moses had in his life, what a moving experience they were. I enjoyed the richness of this novel, the romance and each character that moved throughout the pages. I’m glad that I picked up another one of Amy’s novels at the library; I can’t wait to see where that one leads me.

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text 2016-11-27 11:13
November wrap-up
The Feast of All Souls - Simon Bestwick
Miss Treadway and the Field of Stars: A Novel - Miranda Emmerson
Caramel, Caramel & More Caramel!: Sweet and Savory Recipes for Creative Caramel Cuisine - Ivana Nitzan,Michal Moses
Don't Fear the Reaper - Michelle Muto
The Crystal Cave - Mary Stewart
Bats - William W. Johnstone
The Spy - Paulo Coelho
The Other Einstein: A Novel - Marie Benedict

A little early, but I've finished all the books I'll be finishing for the month and all my current reads are in early stages.

 

I finished all my Netgalley books, Yay! Now all I have to do is resist perusing the site for a while and get some books read from my Kindle!

 

I started two buddy reads and finished one, The Crystal Cave by Mary Stewart. The other one is Don Quixote, which is likely to go on beyond December as it's a long one and I'm reading a chapter or two at a time.

 

So, wow, that's 7 Netgalley books and one buddy read finished in November. A lot for me!

 

I may not get as many done in December as I plan to relax and read randomly as mood takes me, enjoying some of the books I've been wanting to get to and maybe some Christmas books to get in the holiday mood. I've also downloaded all the backlog of samples from my cloud and hope to eliminate a substantial amount of those over time. I did get some read in November, but I didn't keep up the two a day plan. If I can read more than I collect, I'll be making progress!

 

 

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review 2016-11-23 16:02
The Law of Moses
The Law of Moses - Amy Harmon

I tried to figure out why it took me days to read this novel and the only reason I can think of, was the holidays. I tried to read it over Thanksgiving but there was so much going on. The characters were never far from my mind as I kept thinking of Moses and how his ability to paint was controlling his life.  I haven’t read a novel by Amy Harmon in a while so I grabbed this one at the library and after reading the first couple pages I know why I enjoy her writing. Amy pulls you in immediately into her world with her pace and characters that have captivating pasts and intriguing stories. There are always twists in her novels; things that I never see coming and her storylines to me are different. I never know upon reading the synopsis how the story is going to play out, for they are vague but I know Amy’s writings so I realize that I will stumble upon distinct characters and a special and unusual storyline that I will not forget.  

 

He was left in a basket at a Laundromat only moments after his birth for she preferred drugs over being a mother. She was found dead just a few days later. They named this child Moses and he’s passed around to all his remaining living relatives as he is just too much for one person to handle. His great grandmother, a good woman who seems to know how to handle him, usually has him over the summer but she is up in years so the other relatives pass him around during the rest of the year. This goes on for all of Moses childhood. It is Moses’ senior year and his great grandmother is allowed to keep him for the year.   There is some religion in this novel as great grandma is a religious woman who I adored very much. She finds work for Moses as a farmhand on a nearby horse ranch where their horses work with individuals who are troubled. Individuals in the town know of Moses’ rough past and there are people who have already formed their own opinion of him. On the ranch, Georgia also knows of Moses and her father has told her to keep away from him. With her future planned out, Georgia tries to keep her distance from Moses but circumstances have them together more often than not. Moses has a talent, a talent that seems to be getting him in trouble but the need is too great inside him to stop. Moses is a painter, what he paints is not typical but he has no control over it over what he must express.  An artist must reveal what he feels and sees, so Moses paints. I loved the depth that his painting revealed, the mystery and the emotion that followed his art.   The relationships with the individuals that Moses had in his life, what a moving experience they were. I enjoyed the richness of this novel, the romance and each character that moved throughout the pages. I’m glad that I picked up another one of Amy’s novels at the library; I can’t wait to see where that one leads me.

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