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text 2017-03-30 01:18
Reading progress: 22%.
Thief's Covenant - Ari Marmell

Still immersed.

 

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text 2017-03-30 00:55
Reading progress: 10%.
Thief's Covenant - Ari Marmell

One minute I'm approaching with open mind a fantasy genre book with a trope -- poor, underprivileged orphan street kid -- that might be a really good or a truly abysmal book, some brief fictional name dropping that wasn't interesting, then *blink* I'm immersed.

 

This is good.

 

 

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review 2017-03-29 21:44
My Name is Lucy Barton / Elizabeth Strout
My Name Is Lucy Barton: A Novel - Elizabeth Strout

Lucy Barton is recovering slowly from what should have been a simple operation. Her mother, to whom she hasn't spoken for many years, comes to see her. Gentle gossip about people from Lucy's childhood in Amgash, Illinois, seems to reconnect them, but just below the surface lies the tension and longing that have informed every aspect of Lucy's life: her escape from her troubled family, her desire to become a writer, her marriage, her love for her two daughters.

 

Wow, this little book went by quickly! But it deals with deep issues, the stuff that nobody likes to talk about, especially if you’re directly involved. As Lucy and her mother are.

Despite what Lucy tells us about writing—that one should plunge right in and confront the main issues—that’s not how this book is structured. It’s all about reading between the lines, intuiting what’s going on, and piecing together the bits & pieces that Lucy deigns to throw to us, the readers. She tosses out tidbits of information, all from her own point of view and we have no other voices to give us some balance. Only what she reports that her mother or her siblings or her husband said.

A flighty and somewhat untrustworthy narrator, our Lucy, and yet I felt compelled to sift through the fragments to try to figure out exactly what happened in that family home to make her into the uncomfortable person that she currently is. Was it just poverty? Or what else was happening?

If you enjoyed this novel, you might also like The Bean Trees by Barbara Kingsolver. Both examine women’s attempts to escape impoverished backgrounds (and incidentally, I've read both for my real-life book club).

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review 2017-03-29 21:42
Stone Spring / Stephen Baxter
Stone Spring - Stephen Baxter

Ten thousand years ago, a vast and fertile plain exists linking the British Isles to Europe. Home to a tribe of simple hunter-gatherers, Northland teems with nature's bounty, but is also subject to its whims.

Fourteen-year-old Ana calls Northland home, but her world is changing. The air is warming, the ice is melting, and the seas are rising. Then Ana meets a traveler from a far-distant city called Jericho-a city that is protected by a wall. And she starts to imagine the impossible...

 

I read this book for the frivolous reason that it has “Spring” in the title and its springtime as I write this review. Plus, it had been on my TBR list for some time and I decided that it was time that I moved it.

It’s a solid story—set in Mesolithic Europe, as the climate and the land masses change with the melting of the ice sheets. Baxter has obviously done his research on the archaeology of the region, including the parts that are completely underwater now. And he has thrown in his own imaginative touches, creating believable cultures for these prehistoric tribes and inventing one that is entirely fictional, the “Leafy Boys.”

There is conflict—when you’ve got a hammer, every problem looks like a nail and when you’ve got a stone-tipped spear, well everything looks like it needs to be poked with that spear. The primary relationships are those of tribe, parent, child, etc. and not so much romantic. There is very, very little sex described, it is mostly implied or spoken about crudely by loud-mouthed men. In some ways, it is Jean Auel’s Earth’s Children series without the sex and much less emotional angst.

Obvious messages include: slavery is bad, global warming will raise water levels so deal with it, and that it’s difficult to deal with people who hold extremely different worldviews from yourself. I was somewhat unsure of how I felt about the character of Ana, who runs other tribe’s people’s lives ruthlessly and has a baby only to solidify her chosen power structure. I know people like this exist, but her choice of power over genuine emotion bothered me.

I guess what I didn’t entirely care for was the grafting of 21st century values and motivations onto Stone Age people. It didn’t always ring true for me, but it was still a pretty good book.

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text 2017-03-28 23:32
Library Lion - Michelle Knudsen,Kevin Hawkes

Library Lion, by Michelle Knudsen, is the perfect story to introduce manners of the library to your students. This book's Lexile reading level is 470L, and it would be of the greatest benefit to preschoolers or kindergartners. The central focus of the story is on this lion who ventures into the library one day. The librarian, Miss Merriweather, is strict when it comes to following the rules in the library. When the lion wanders in, most people are panicking about the fact that a lion is walking around. Miss Merriweather tells everyone that he is only allowed to stay as long as he follows the rules. The library must be quiet at all times, and there is no running allowed. The lion proves to be of big help to the librarian and all of the people working there. His big feet are surprisingly quiet on the library floor, and he loves to be a comfy backrest for all of the children who come for story hour. He always makes sure that he is following the rules, but one day an emergency happens. Readers must ask themselves: are there good reasons to sometimes break the rules? This story would be perfect to read to preschoolers or kindergartners who have never been to the library before. It shows the rules that most libraries require students to follow, but it also helps them see that sometimes it is okay to break those rules when emergencies happen. I would read this book to my students before they took a trip to the library during the first few days of school. We could talk about the rules and mannerisms of the library, and then we could all take a class field trip to explore it together!

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