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text 2017-04-21 12:29
cdp.pl wyłącza wirtualne półki - pobierz e-booki

 

Otrzymałem właśnie ze sklepu cdp.pl list z informacją, że należy pobrać wszystkie e-booki, gry, kody czy faktury, które są zgromadzone na wirtualnej półce przypisanej do konta. Po 30 kwietnia 2017 roku użytkownicy sklepu stracą dostęp do tych treści. Warto więc jak najszybciej zalogować się na swoje konto w cdp.pl i wykonać kopię zakupów. Zawsze warto wykonywać kopie zapasowe na własny użytek, a to jest moment, kiedy należy to zrobić. Bez względu na to, jak pewne są wirtualne chmury. Jak wykonać na przykład kopię księgozbioru w calibre, pisałem w tekście "Calibre - jak to jest zrobione? Kopia zapasowa katalogu e-booków i ustawień programu".

 

List z cdp.pl informujący o likwidacji wirtualnych półek

 

W rozmowie telefonicznej z infolinią, otrzymałem potwierdzenie tej informacji. Nie udało mi się jednak uzyskać wyjaśnień na temat tego, jak będzie np. wyglądał zakup e-booków po wspomnianej dacie 30 IV. Konsultant, z którym rozmawiałem, stwierdził że sklep będzie nadal funkcjonował. Czyżby nam się szykowała jakaś fuzja na rynku?

 

[Aktualizacja]

Rzeczywiście, została zapowiedziana fuzja sklepów cdp.pl oraz merlin.pl. Świat czytników wskazuje na źródło tej informacji.

 

[Aktualizacja]

Użytkownicy cdp.pl otrzymali kolejny list, tym razem z informacją, że wirtualna półka będzie dostępna również po przejęciu sklepu przez merlin.pl. Nie oznacza to jednak, że wszystkie produkty pozostaną na półce po zmianie właściciela sklepu, ponieważ to cdp. pl był operatorem licencji.

 

Korekta informacji z cdp.pl na temat wirtualnej półki

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review 2016-11-30 10:11
The Fire of Merlin (The Return to Camelot #2) by Donna Hosie
The Fire of Merlin - Donna Hosie
The Fire of Merlin starts where Searching For Arthur finished. Natasha is racing towards Bedivere, her world once again in its rightful place now that he is back in time! Of course, in time in this phrase means quite literally that, as he has moved through from his time to hers. So we start off quite humorously as the Knights of the Round Table try to fit in with modern life. We also get another glimpse of Natasha's home life, which isn't so good. Before too long, we are heading back into the past, to fight for the future. 
 
This book is once again extremely well written, with comments and snarks completely in keeping with a 17-year-old, and her relationship with her older brother. The made up insults with Guenivere had me laughing out loud, whilst other parts of it had me welling up. Natasha doesn't have an easy ride of it again, but she is strong and resilient, and is determined to fight for those she loves. 
 
With a smooth and flowing pace, the plot is never confused about where it is going or which time it is in, which makes for excellent reading. There were no editing or grammatical errors to disrupt the reading flow. A wonderful addition to the series, and highly recommended by me.
 
*Verified Purchase on Amazon - June 2016*
 
Merissa
Archaeolibrarian - I Dig Good Books!
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text 2016-11-23 04:54
The Crystal Cave – Section 2: The Falcon
The Crystal Cave - Mary Stewart

The Crystal Cave Section 2 – The Falcon covers the adolescence of Myrddin Emrys.  His years from 12 to 18 were spent in Less Britain (aka Brittany) in the household of the exiled Ambrosius

who it is revealed is his father

(spoiler show)

This section is again mostly stage setting, though there are a few memorable visions, most notably the vision of Ambrosius slaying the white bull and those following the encounter with human sacrifice at the hands of arch-druid Belasius.  

 

 My reading experience improved after I summoned a copy of the book from the library with larger type than the paperback I started with. I can see how the allusions to pre-Christian religions would have titillated the teenage me during my first reading, but as a more mature reader I’m finding The Crystal Cave somehow flat.  Not sure how much of that is the book and how much is from my emotional state following the US election.  

 

My gut sense is that the original schedule would have had us finishing The Crystal Cave this week.  I’m unlikely to do so, as I’ve been alternating sections of The Crystal Cave with several other reads, but will keep going even if the buddy read has officially moved on to Volume 2.

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text 2016-11-20 16:54
Reading progress update: I've read 340 out of 928 pages.
Merlin Trilogy - Mary Stewart
The Crystal Cave - Mary Stewart
The Hollow Hills - Mary Stewart

 

(Page numbers are for the omnibus edition.)

 

Well, I finished The Crystal Cave (a while ago in fact) and have now moved on to The Hollow Hills, which picks up right where the first book of the trilogy ends.  Merlin is still rather unlike the wise old wizard as whom I'd so far seen him and is becoming ever closer to what I'd so far imagined young Arthur to have been ... but I'm still enjoying the read as such.

 

For those who care, I thought I'd share a couple of photos from the location of the final chapters of The Crystal Cave and the first chapters of The Hollow Hills, Tintagel, where legend has it that King Arthur was conceived ... or, well, photos of what's left of the Tintagel castle ruins (which incidentally date from the 12th, not from the 6th century), as well as the paths that Merlin and Uther would have had to climb, first down to the beach and then back up along the face of the cliff, to get to the castle high up on the promontory:

 




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review 2016-11-20 16:37
The Crystal Cave by Mary Stewart
The Crystal Cave (Merlin, #1) - Mary Stewart

Series: Arthurian Saga #1

 

Completely unmemorable.

 

The old man telling the child and then the young man’s story sounded stale to me. Merlin seemed to be more of a sock puppet than a person. I didn’t really care about anyone in the story, and most of the dialogue rang false, somehow.

 

The prose was so unmemorable that I’d pick up the book where I’d left off the night before and be completely unable to find my place because nothing sounded familiar (specifically in Book IV). I generally have a much better memory than that, so there was something about Stewart’s words that just wouldn’t stick in my head. In fact, it happened frequently that I’d discover that although I’d read every word in the preceding paragraphs, I couldn’t remember what they’d said. I don’t know why, but the book couldn’t hold my attention. The threads just slipped away.

 

I don’t blame my 8-year-old self for giving up even after passing the halfway point. The book adds nothing as an interpretation of the legend, or at least nothing interesting. My rating reflects the fact that the book completely failed to engage my interest and attention. Others evidently had different experiences.

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