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review 2017-09-16 00:07
Self-deprecation at its best
One Day We'll All Be Dead and None of This Will Matter: Essays - Scaachi Koul

I first heard about Scaachi Koul's One Day We'll All Be Dead and None of This Will Matter several months ago on BookTube (I will continue to sing its praises) and added it to my TRL as I felt the need to read more Canadian authors. This book is a collection of essays about Scaachi's life growing up as a child of Indian immigrants in Canada. There's a focus on body positivity, feminism, and the endemic racism she and other people of color face in that country. She discusses her family and how she is the direct product of two disparate parenting philosophies. (Each chapter begins with an email conversation between herself and her father. He's quite possibly the funniest man on planet earth.) She's deeply afraid of going outside of her comfort zone and yet she's in a relationship with a man who seems to do nothing but push her to do just that. (I thought I had travel anxiety until I read about her experiences flying.) It's a look into a family as different and yet somehow the same as mine or yours. There's always going to be some neuroses in any family. It's about self-discovery, self-love, and ultimately self-acceptance. It was a lot of fun but judging from the fact that I had to refresh my memory by looking up the blurb it isn't the most memorable book I've had the pleasure of reading this year. So I'm gonna give it a 6/10. 

 

A/N: I really need to start making detailed notes about the books I've read immediately after reading them because my backlog of book reviews is getting more and more lengthy. Stay tuned for a special post on Tuesday by the way. ;-)

 

Source: Amazon

 

What's Up Next: Stories of Your Life and Others by Ted Chiang

 

What I'm Currently Reading: Woolly: The True Story of the Quest to Revive One of History's Most Iconic Extinct Creatures by Ben Mezrich

Source: readingfortheheckofit.blogspot.com
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review 2017-09-05 07:55
If My Moon Was Your Sun by Andreas Steinhofel & Nele Palmtag (Artwork)

At about 37%, I was smiling, this so far has given me really good warm and fuzzy feelings. I am in love with the artwork. It's heartwarming and makes me happy. I do not know if I would call this a picture book. Sure, there are a lot of pictures, but just as much text or more. I feel like this book is good for any age, but when thinking about children, probably 7+ if the child is an avid reader and knows the love of a grandparent. They could surely relate to this story. I can relate, even as an adult. I feel like I would do something like Max did for a loved one if I knew I could get away with it and knew for sure there would be no dangers involved for anybody.

Whenever the grandfather does The Great Forgetting, I feel my stomach drop and I want to cry. It is so, so heartbreaking and Andreas Steinhofel writes this wonderfully. I am impressed with their writing style. It is beautiful and touching.

I smiled so much during the dancing bits. There are parts in this story that are cute and make me giggle, but then parts that make my heart hurt. There is a point in the book where Max mentions a fear he has and it caused me to feel overwhelmingly emotional. I love that this book invokes such emotions. To think, I just randomly found this for review on Netgally.

My final thoughts: I loved this. I would buy the final version. It's beautiful and I want the audiobook/music to complete my experience with this.

 



Disclaimer: I received this from Netgally in exchange for an honest review. Thank you for the chance to read this!

Just a note: This comes with an audiobook/music, but we do not get those when reviewing the book on Netgally. I do feel like it makes us miss out on some of the emotion the author wants us to feel, as the audiobook/music goes with the text.

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review 2017-09-02 22:07
Book 53/100: Modern Romance by Anziz Ansari
Modern Romance - Aziz Ansari,Eric Klinenberg

First off, I want to tell everyone who is interested in these comedian/celebrity memoirs that they're really wasting their time if they don't listen to the audiobook versions. Hearing Ansari's inflections, the voices he did for the various "characters" (interview subjects, etc.), and the asides to the listener not present in the printed version all lead to me not wanting to experience this book any other way, missing charts be damned.

The subject of "modern romance" (how the experience of dating, coupling up, etc., has changed over time, especially with the advent of online dating) is already an interesting one, but truth be told I had already encountered most of the information compiled in this book through earlier reading. This is basically a "literature review" with some original research thrown in, and if you haven't already read a lot of the source material or other pieces that reference the source material, this book serves as a really good overview of the subject. If you are familiar with all that stuff, Ansari's "take" on it is refreshing, insightful, and funny, which makes the experience feel new even if the information isn't.

Also, I have a ton of respect for Ansari for not just writing another celebrity memoir but instead actually delving into subject matter that interests him and offering something besides stories about his childhood that is still infused with enough of his personality to give people who read it for the celebrity recognition their "fix." And yeah, he might sort of be my celebrity crush.

(BTW, if you listen to this while being coupled up, I highly recommend sharing it with your partner. The humorous approach makes it feel far less like "work" than self-help books about relationships, but the subject matter can still open up all sorts of really worthwhile discussions.)

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review SPOILER ALERT! 2017-07-31 09:56
A Review of the Reasons Why the Frankenstein’s Monster in the Eponymous Book by Susan Heyboer O’Keefe Will Break Your Heart!
Frankenstein's Monster: A Novel - Susan Heyboer O'Keefe

 

 

Background

 

He begins his story right from where the original work by Mary Shelley left off. The monster tries to kill himself and fails repeatedly. If the polar cold doesn’t hurt him, I’d say there are few things that could!

 

P.S. Read my review of the original classic here. For more information on Project Frankenstein, click here.

 

Reasons for Heart-Break

 

Reason # 1

He says things like:

 

 

 

 

 

Reason # 2

He is well-read just like the creature from the original book. However, no one appreciated his genius.

 

 

Reason # 3

He is willing to believe in the goodness of humans even after what he has suffered at their hands. In fact, he acknowledges this is because he has met quite a few people who have been kind to him, including a nun.

 

Reason # 4

He is stuck in an abusive relationship with a woman who tortures and provokes him mercilessly. Yet not unlike many humans, he can’t seem to let her go.

 

Reason # 5

When the woman gives birth to someone else’s child, the creature steels his heart to try and murder the child according to its mother’s desires. He can’t!

 

Reason # 6

He is followed by an insane person — the captain of the ship that Victor Frankenstein died on. That person destroys his life but when given a chance to end the crazy person’s life, all the monster feels is pity.

 

Reason # 7

Even with all that is going on, the creature appreciates a good sense of humor.

 

Reason # 8

By the end of the book, he has decided that he will be raising the kid. It isn’t going to be easy because its mother starved herself throughout her pregnancy, so she’d lose the child. The kid’s brain will show what difference her ministrations must have made. The kid is also crippled.

 

Why I Love Botany

 

 

Final Thoughts

The relationship, if it can’t be called that, Frankenstein’s monster and the woman, Lily were in, had shades of Heathcliff and Cathy’s relationship from Wuthering Heights. It might not have been healthy but it made for an interesting read.

 


Originally published at midureads.wordpress.com on July 31, 2017.

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review 2017-07-10 02:17
Magic Carpet Ride
Pashmina - Nidhi Chanani

 

Pashmina is the story of an artistic high school girl, Priyanka, whose mother immigrated to America from India before she was born. Priyanka wants to know more about the Indian culture, and about her father, but her mother refuses to discuss either one. To make matters worse, Priyanka’s favorite uncle is having a child of his own and she feels left out. Then Priyanka finds a magical pashmina in an old suitcase, which transports her to the colorful, fascinating India of her dreams. Luckily, her aunt, who still lives in India, calls and invites Priyanka to visit. This visit answers Priyanka’s questions, shows her what her mother’s life was like before she left, and helps her continue her own artistic journey upon her return.

 

The strengths of this graphic novel are in the simple but endearing illustrations, the bursts of color that signal the pashmina’s magical escapades, and in the characterization of the teen lead, whose angsty behavior is just edgy enough without being off-putting. This would be a great companion to American Born Chinese or Persepolis, and could be enjoyed by students in middle or high school.

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