logo
Wrong email address or username
Wrong email address or username
Incorrect verification code
back to top
Search tags: witches
Load new posts () and activity
Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2020-07-07 22:18
Review ~ Great read!
The Vampire Book Club - Nancy Warren
This is a joint review with Bea from Bea's Book Nook

Plot

Bea: The story was slow and the grand reveal was over the top. I'm worried there may be a romance developing between Quinn and Lachlan. Worried because it's such an obvious and trite story path to take.

AVR: The murder mystery seems a little contrived and I agree that the reveal was a bit much. It does seem as if the author is leading us toward a Lachlan/Quinn romance. I don't mind if they date, but I'd like to see some other interest(s) for Quinn. Maybe because I'm not a huge fan of the romance between Rafe & Lucy in the Knitting series. Mostly because Lucy doesn't seem to be all in either. Actually, Quinn seems a better choice as a romantic interest for a vampire than Lucy because she doesn't seem to have the same "immortal" hang up that Lucy still does. I guess we'll see.

Bea: Oh yes, the mystery felt quite contrived but then so did the location of the book club meetings. Lachlan's home would seem to make more sense, if only from a privacy perspective.

Characters

Bea:I liked seeing Rafe, Agnes, and Sylvia. I loved that this trip to Ireland was referenced in a couple of the book Vampire Knitting Club series. And since I read the most recent Knitting book before I read this one, I met Lachlan in that. It was a nice little preview.

AVR: I haven't quite warmed up to Quinn like I did immediately with Lucy, but I do like her. And I do like she's an older character with experiences under her belt. I'm worried this series will flounder because the town is so tiny. I like a lot of great side characters to help move the story along and add depth and richness. And humor. The Knitting series has plenty of those, so maybe we'll meet more in the Book series. Bonus for adding Rafe, Silvia, and Agnes to create a crossover. Can never hate my favorite characters making an appearance in a connecting series.

Bea: I also like the interconnecting characters and the fact that the appearance of Rafe, Sylvia, and Agnes made sense and wasn't random. Although, now that I think about it, it might not make sense if you haven't read the originating series. The tiny town is a concern; it runs the risk of turning into Murder, She Wrote.

World Building

Bea: I'm not sure it can be read apart from the original series; maybe it could. Warren did further the world building and I have learned a lot more about witches now, especially their governance.

AVR: The one thing I like about this over the Knitting series is the witch stuff. I learned more because Quinn takes it seriously. That's one thing that pisses me off about Lucy. She keeps blowing her witchiness off. Gah!

Bea: I did like learning more about the witch business, and getting a closer look at it. I agree about Lucy; she needs to take it more seriously. Quinn is more serious about it and far more accomplished.

Overall

Bea: It took a while to warm up to Quinn. She's a good person and a good witch, most of the time. But she rubbed me the wrong way at times. I love that she's a middle aged character. The older I get, the more I love seeing characters closer to my age.

AVR: The story was a bit slow to get off the ground, but it is the first book and any series needs to start somewhere. Once the groundwork was laid it cruised along at a decent rate. The reveal seemed a bit iffy and I'm not quite sure about where this maybe romance is heading between Quinn and Lachlan, but I'll reserve judgment for now. I'm looking forward to book 2.

Bea: Agreed, it was slow to get going but it slowly picked up steam. I'm not sure how authentic the depiction is of an Irish village but it's a charming locale. I was not a fan of the reveal; it was over the top. It was a nod to classic mystery reveals but too contrived for my liking. I concerns about the viability of the series but I like the location despite my concerns and I like book store settings. The humor appeals to me and I'm intrigued by Quinn and the others. I'll be back for book two.
Source: imavoraciousreader.blogspot.com/2020/07/the-vampire-book-club.html
Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2020-06-13 18:23
The Accidental Demon Slayer by Angie Fox
The Accidental Demon Slayer - Angie Fox
Lizzie's adoptive parents were decent enough but never very loving, so she's thrilled when her biological grandmother contacts her out of the blue and wants to meet. Her dreams of warm hugs are ruined when her grandmother locks her in her own bathroom, just in time for a demon to appear and try to kill her. Once that's been dealt with, her grandmother explains that she's a witch and Lizzie is a demon slayer, and they have to get moving before more demons arrive. Lizzie is a preschool teacher who carefully plans everything, so this is very much outside her comfort zone, but she eventually grabs her dog Pirate (who can now talk) and reluctantly gets on her grandmother's motorcycle.
 
Lizzie's grandmother takes her to the Red Skulls coven, where she's supposed to gain the coven's protection and begin learning to use her powers. These plans are complicated by imps, more demons, a sexy shape-shifting griffin named Dimitri, werewolves, and no one being willing to tell Lizzie anything about what's going on.
 
If I hadn't been reading this for my Booklikesopoly game, I might have DNFed it early on and added it to my offload pile. I wouldn't have missed out on much. This was an incredibly frustrating read. Pretty much the only things I liked were Lizzie's talking dog, who was a bit much at first but eventually grew on me, and maybe Lizzie, although I did think she was way too forgiving.
 
Lizzie barely got a chance to speak to her grandmother for the first time before she was dragged into a world of magic and supernatural creatures. With no time to get her bearings, she was taken to her grandmother's coven, where she was told nothing important and immediately made to take part in a protection spell that wasn't fully explained to her. She was rightfully worried about drinking something that might have bits of roadkill in it, and that potion turned out to be the most important part of the spell. She then blamed herself for screwing up, even though it was due to the coven not explaining anything to her, and the coven had the gall to get mad at her when they found out.
 
And it kept happening - everyone either lied to Lizzie, expected her to do as she was told without even a basic explanation, or deliberately withheld information from her. Most of the characters in this book sucked, and I wouldn't have blamed Lizzie for leaving them behind to deal with their problems on their own. Dimitri, Ant Eater (a member of the coven), and Lizzie's grandmother were the biggest offenders.
 
There was no magical system as far as I could see. If the author wanted a spell to exist, it probably did (there were giggle, dance, and transportation spells), and Lizzie eventually learned how to use these things called switch stars that were basically magical ninja stars. The ending was a mess - Lizzie and her grandmother did things more because the story called for it than because it fit anything that had previously been established about how magic and demons worked.
 
The "paranormal romance" label on the book's spine wasn't very accurate. Lizzie thought Dimitri was hot, and they eventually had sex, but there wasn't much of what I'd call romance and the story was more focused on the whole demon thing than on Lizzie and Dimitri's relationship. "Urban fantasy with romantic aspects" might be a more accurate label.
 
Anyway, I don't intend to read any more of this series. The dog was sweet, but the magical aspects were very weak, and Lizzie deciding to stay with people who'd spent the whole book lying to her or refusing to tell her anything she needed to know honestly made me think less of her.
 
(Original review posted on A Library Girl's Familiar Diversions.)
Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2020-06-09 16:01
Witch Lit
Witch Lit: Words From The Cauldron - Witches Who Write

Edited by Laura Perry

 

I enjoyed this collection very much. It's a compilation of fantasy short stories and poems about magical settings or characters written by writers involved in Wicca or Paganism in some form. I won't comment on the poems because I've never been a fan of poetry, but the stories were well worth the nominal price I paid and all proceeds go to a literary charity, Books for Africa, so I bought it on pre-order, only recognising a couple of the authors, knowing my money was well spent whether the stories held up or not.

 

I would say only three stories were really professional quality, but there were no duds. All of the stories were reasonably well-written and the editing was pristine. There was just a certain self-indulgence in the plotting of some of them that is common with Pagan writers turning to fiction, though thankfully not universal.

 

Overall the really good stories made it worth far more than I paid, so I can't complain. At least I've discovered at least one new good author and the first story, by one of the names I recognised (Nils Visser), has piqued my interest in a series connected to his story. A good result as indie anthologies go.

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2020-06-09 15:59
Willa Wicked
Willa Wicked: A Charming Tale - A.M. Hudson

by A.M. Hudson

 

This is a YA teenage witch story. The premise sounds really corny, but somehow it seems to work. Willa the teenage witch befriends her neighbour who everyone thinks is a dork. His recent suicide attempt makes them a little careful and mostly they whisper behind his back.

 

Little do they know, Henry Charming is not of their world. Through the minefield of high school dances and crushes, Henry has a bigger issue to deal with and Willa is the only person he trusts to tell his secret. Meanwhile, Willa's crush on a popular guy brings its own teenage angst.

 

There's a strong fairytale thread in this story and it isn't the sort of thing I would want to read a lot of, but it was done pretty well so as YA stuff goes, I can't complain too much. I did find myself wanting to know what would happen in the end. There's even one scary bit.

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2020-05-28 13:48
The Discovery of Witches
The Discovery of Witches - Hopkins, Matthew

by Matthew Hopkins

 

 

This is an account by a witchfinder not so much of his history but to answer questions and concerns among the authorities of his time.

 

Within his answers are details about methods for recognising witches and how to tell the difference between ordinary anomalies like marks on the skin and unusual ones that indicate a pact with the Devil.

 

Reading his explanations reminded me of some of the least logical troll discussions I've seen on line. I'm sure it all made perfect sense to Hopkins, but as we all know, witchfinders tended to have their own agenda and much of it was based either on greed, lust or superstition.

 

As a historical record, this is invaluable. It tells us the mindset of one of the best known witchfinders in an age of hysteria. I'm glad it was short though. I couldn't read through too much of that. If anything, it highlights some of the worst side of humanity and our potential for cruelty to our fellow creatures and each other.

More posts
Your Dashboard view:
Need help?