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text SPOILER ALERT! 2020-01-24 20:36
Reading progress update: I've read 233 out of 418 pages.
Crown of Midnight - Sarah J. Maas

Nehemia

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quote 2020-01-24 07:40
If they wanted adarlands's assassin , they'd get her.
And wyrd help them when she arrived.
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review 2020-01-23 10:00
Indebted Review and GIVEAWAY!
 
 

About the Book


Book:  Indebted

Author: Charmayne Hafen

Genre: Young Adult, Adventure, Mythology

Release Date: August 25, 2019

When the abandoned princess discovers a friend, some muscle, and a passion for swords, she also acquires the crucible by which she uncovers the mysterious key to unlock her grief and win true freedom. Or will her strength confound her future in the kingdom to which she rides?

At the mythical edge of the Berkshire Forests, Wren finds herself rattling around in an austere castle, abandoned by the King and Queen. King Belodawn seems to blame his daughter for the mysterious disappearance of his wife, and he avoids his daughter at all costs in favor of conquests requiring his person away from the kingdom. But, things are about to change; the princess has matured. Wren’s spirit refuses to remain the lost bird she became at age twelve. With the aid of the cook and the cook’s son, Wren discovers her unknown dexterity in sword fighting. With it, she believes a new community in which to live will open up but is this young girl prepared to encounter deceptive ghosts, angels, and demons in the maze of the forest to attain her aim?



Click HERE for your copy.  

About the Author

 


Charmayne Hafen is a graduate of John Brown University and has her masters in counseling from the Denver Seminary. Her love of Celtic mythology in Christian themes inspired her to write her debut Young Adult novel, Indebted: The Berkshire Dragon. She is a fan of the author, Stephen Lawhead.
 
She has written several short stories for children, teens, and adults, as well as the fantasy trilogy being published in 2020 by Capture Books, called, The Land of Twilight. She is currently working on the development of her sequel to The Berkshire Dragon.
 
Charmayne has a Bachelor of Science degree in journalism and psychology as well as a Master of Arts degree in counseling. When she’s not writing, Charmayne is running counseling groups for adults and a therapeutic photography group for teens. She lives in Denver, Colorado with her husband John and her two chihuahuas, Pepe and Frida.
 
 

More from Charmayne

 

Hello, Readers, Educators, Book Reviewers and Celebrate Lit Bloggers!
 
Although I am new to a lot of social media, I have heard that your group is a fantastic resource to new authors. Being a little bit of an introvert, you might even call me reluctant or a slow starter, but I assure you that I can imagine strategies and battle in the heavenlies for readers’ minds with the best of ’em. I say, “Let’s go!”
 
Please feel free to connect with me on any social media platform, or to write to me directly. I have loved engaging with anyone who has read my book and has sent me a comment or question. Because Indebted was published, I was thrilled to be able to speak to a group of college students taking coursework in literature and writing at Texas Tech last year.
 
I love facilitating creative writing seminars especially speaking to authors about how to join a system of discipline and creativity to overcome writer’s block.
 
My hope, however, is to be able to engage more students in elementary school and junior high about the topics in my books because I write about the things facing young people with a certain perspective that the Lord sees them right where they are, that God actually cares deeply for them, and that He has answers for them.  These answers include that Jesus paid the penalty for a kid’s lying, bullying, violence, disbelief, envy, and rebellion and that bringing them to back to God means that they get to be adopted into His kingdom as princes and princesses.
 
I hope that my books provide that suspension of disbelief needed for us all to see the possibility of walking in faith with others in traumatic times and to experience the wonders of God’s word to us.
 
Sincerely and Gratefully,
 
Charmayne
 

My Review

 

A captivating, adventurous tale that weaves fantasy and faith, Charmayne Hafen’s “Indebted” sweeps readers into mid-sixteenth-century Berkshire, England. Princess Wren has been confined to her father’s castle since the disappearance of her mother, alone and friendless until the castle cook introduces her to her son, Aleric. Wren dreams of escaping her insulated world and finds the courage to do so at age 17. However, her dream quickly morphs into a nightmare as a series of events unfolds and she finds herself indebted to a fiendish beast. Along the way, she realizes that she cannot free herself on her own, and that perhaps the answer to her dilemma lies in her fledgling faith.

There are many laudable aspects to this novel. Fantasy is not one of my preferred genres, and so it is always exciting to find a book that I enjoy from this category. In Wren, Hafen brings to life an unconventional heroine who is intelligent but naïve, who carries a heavy burden of guilt on her shoulders and who suffers from abandonment. Yet the tone of this book is hopeful because of Wren’s resilience and even more so because her journey leads her to God, a path that is at times circuitous as she battles her own fear. She is in awe that “Christ promised never to leave or forsake his followers…I couldn’t believe I could talk to God at any time and He would listen. This was more amazing than learning how to sword fight or ride a horse. This was the greatest give I had ever been given.” When her circumstances become overwhelming, she finds solace in the Psalms, remarking, “I marveled at King David’s passion and depth of sorrow. I felt like he had peered into my soul and put words to my struggles. I was not alone.” As a core theme, the idea of being abandoned and feeling so forlorn hits the mark, particularly for the intended young adult audience. Friendship and running away are also very germane, and the first-person narration drives home the point. The evangelization in the story is strong at a few different parts, and although I tend to favor a less blunt approach, it works here due to the characters.

“Indebted” is in some ways allegorical, with Biblical allusions interspersed throughout the narrative. It can, however, be enjoyed by those who may be unfamiliar with the Bible. The sketch illustrations enhance the story and aid in visualization. I think that there were some anachronistic phrases employed, but these will help younger readers connect with and understand the tale better. There are grammatical errors, but not to the extent of detracting from the writing. All of the elements come together well to form a solid story and to encourage readers, young and old alike, to turn to Jesus, the only One who promises to be with us always.

I received a complimentary copy of this book through Celebrate Lit and was not required to post a favorable review. All opinions are my own.

 

Blog Stops

 

Texas Book-aholic, January 22

For The Love Of Literature, January 23

Just the Write Escape, January 24

Debbie’s Dusty Deliberations, January 25

Mamma Loves Books, January 26

Wishful Endings, January 26 (Author Interview)

Truth and Grace Homeschool Academy, January 27

By The Book, January 28 (Author Interview)

janicesbookreviews, January 29

Inklings and notions, January 30

A Baker’s Perspective, January 31 (Author Interview)

Seasons of Opportunities, February 1

Blogging With Carol, February 2

Library Lady’s Kid Lit, February 3

Artistic Nobody, February 4

 

Giveaway

 

 
To celebrate her tour, Charmayne is giving away the grand prize of a pillow made with one of the illustrations!!
 
Be sure to comment on the blog stops for nine extra entries into the giveaway! Click the link below to enter.
 

 

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review 2020-01-23 06:40
Safe
Extra Innings - Lynn Stevens

Victoria AKA "Vic" is gonna play baseball.  Who cares if it is a male dominated sport.  She signed up, showed up, and played hard.  She is gonna prove herself if it kills her.

 

Daniel knows she has a boyfriend, but he also knows the guy is a tool.  He cannot help but be interested in a girl who knows her own mind.  She can play baseball, and is a great addition to the team.

 

This book felt like is was fast paced.  I love the characters and eagerly devoured each page.  I felt like this book was a great read.  The story was rich, the characters fun to read, and the heat was just gentle.  I cannot wait to read the next installment!  I give this a 4/5 Kitty's Paws UP!

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review SPOILER ALERT! 2020-01-22 22:39
Wilder Girls-Review
Wilder Girls - Rory Power

I am overly conflicted about this book. There are many aspects I liked about it : the body horror, the government cover up, and the queer aspects just to name a few, but there are many aspects about it that just fell flat for me. In fact I was quite nervous to finish it because quite certain that however it may it that it was going to ruin the entire book for me. I put off the ending,aka the last two chapters, to the point that I finished an entire Pet Sematary audiobook before I finally went back to finish it.

 

As much as I love darker themed young adult novels, I was really wanting it to be darker than it ended up being . I realize this is a personal issue and had I wanted to read a darker body horror novel there are plenty of adult novels that would have been better suited to my needs. Even so I was still expecting just a bit more from this one.A lot of my issues, though, with this book in particular plot points that to me do not make sense. For instance more than half way through the book an incident with the fence safe-guarding the school from the twisted animals that now roam the woods allows a bear to get inside said fence, and inside the school itself. Under the circumstances, it would still be case for alarm if a normal bear had gotten in. Given that it is twisted by whatever is infecting the island, which turns out at the end to be some parasitic worm thing, it is meant to be a even more terrifying experience was frustrating since Hetty and most of the other girls are able to outrun the bear from room to room and barricade themselves inside said rooms. The latter is at least more believable than the former. During the whole encounter only one girl ,that I recall, actually dies from the whole episode with the bear.

 

I am not saying the author should have killed off more characters, she is not at all shy to kill characters or least some of them, but the fact remains that some how they are able to outrun the bear when people have hard time running away from "normal" bears in the wild. It just all feel too overly convenient. What should have been a high stacks nerve wrecking scene just to me held no tension whatsoever. Mentioning killing characters, though, the author does rack up quite the body count and yet it doesn't hold the impact, least to me, that the author intended. I will like to state character deaths other than a few instances(aka my favorite character in a given work or a death that comes completely by surprise) rarely do much for me. Here, though, the deaths that do occur suffer from particular aspect of novels that really bug me : killing of faceless,nameless, "unimportant, side character(s). Now I am not saying the death of side characters always come off as "safe bets" or meaningless deaths but here it does. Of the characters that do die, the reader only really gets to know the slightest bit of them based on what Hetty has said about them or the few scenes they are present in, which is not enough in to develop them or they were not develop as well as they should have been. Instead in this book , it feels like the reader should be shocked by the number of death instead of who actual has dies. I felt the same way about the two adults that died and then the boy that dies from Byatt kissing him.Given how little time we get to know them their deaths hold little or no impact. If you don't really give the proper time to really know characters than their deaths just don't mean much .

 

The only death that would and could of held any meaning the author took back , which is a trend in books and other media that I hate. Will be the first to admit I am not a doctor, but I was pretty sure with how invasive Byatt is removing the worm thing in her arm, how much blood she loses in the process, a fact that Hetty remarks on when Byatt is finally found, and the fact that Byatt is left alone who knows how long with no medical assistance she would not still be alive .Least it doesn't seem like she should still be alive. I think it would have much more impactful to have her die, have Hetty deal with that grief and pain of not being able to get there in time, which it seems for a moment she is than to be oh no Byatt is actual alive, very very weak by somehow still alive.

 

Another aspect of the novel that sort of threw me was the romantic subplot. I love that there is a queer relationship in this and other than the body horror was an element that made me pick it up in the first place,but I am still confused by the two that get together. From the start, was pretty sure Byatt and Hetty were meant to be the romantic pair given how close they seemed in every scene they shared together and given the book was from their two points of view. I have nothing against power close friendships and given what has happen the students may cling tighter to each other more than ever before,but it just felt like more than friendship between the two of them , least from Hetty's chapters. No, though, seems Reese and Hetty are the ones that get together, which just really confused me. Hetty spends way less time with her, at one point Reese tries to choke here and for awhile seems like they are not even friends anymore and are not not even talking. I can buy that Byatt and Hetty are just really close best friends . Books need more powerful platonic best friendships they really do. The fact still remains that relationship makes no sense between the two that are paired up in this book. Maybe I was missing subtle clues but to me seems they went from sort of again not even being friends because of Hetty getting boat shift, something Reese really wants to try to find her dad, to kissing and suddenly are sort of together. If this was the plan where were there no chapter from Reese to get to know her more and develop her more?

 

Overall I enjoyed it enough to finish even if I put off finishing it but I wanted more from it. I really enjoyed the body horror aspects of it and when they were the focus the book was really exciting . I just really wanted more of those aspects I am not faulting it for not being as dark and gritty as I first thought. I get it is young adult and the darker elements have to be toned down in some way for that target audience. Even so what it did do in that respect was great and just again wanted more of it. I was not a fan of the lack of any explanation for the Tox. I was not expecting a full exposition dump since that would have been over the top and annoying , but was expecting something more than was in the book. I get diseases are confusing in real life but was expecting some sort of explanation to parts of it at least in this. Finally as much as I love open endings , when they make sense, the ending felt rushed and abrupt.Was overall just disappointed in a lot of the aspects of this novel. The cover is gorgeous,though

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