logo
Wrong email address or username
Wrong email address or username
Incorrect verification code
back to top
Search tags: 1-rec-for-jason
Load new posts () and activity
Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2017-12-07 03:26
More fun, danger and murder with Slim and Anci searching for a missing dog.
Red Dog: A Slim in Little Egypt Mystery - Jason Miller

“And for sixty-flve dollars, too.”

 

Anci rolled her eyes. “Oh, I <u>know</u>. Usually, you get kicked in the head for free. Why not try it for money this time? Besides, this is your chance to do a good deed, pile up some karma.”

 

“You can’t eat karma, darlin’..”

 

“No, but it can eat you.”

 

I really can't decide what part of these books I like best -- Slim's dogged determinism when it comes to finishing what he's started, Jeep's almost-superhuman capabilities (he's Hawk + Joe Pike, with a better romantic life while not as tied to reality), or Anci. Okay, that's a lie. It's Anci -- she's smart, she's insightful, she's sweet, she's got an attitude that just won't quit.

 

In this book, Anci takes time out from critiquing <b>The Hound of the Baskervilles</b> to convince Slim to take a case for a couple of odd strangers that show up on their doorstep. They want him to find their dog for him. They're pretty sure where the dog is, but they don't think they could retrieve her.

 

Slim takes the case, and within hours he's cut off part of a man's body, had several threats made against him, and discovers a dead body. Oh, he finds the dog, too. But that doesn't matter, because he's arrested before he can return the dog.

 

Things go haywire from there -- Slim's still bound and determined to find the dog while he clears his name (or vice versa). The hunt for the dog and the real killer takes him to all sorts of places he probably shouldn't go -- many of which make the coal mining he left behind seem like a safe alternative to his current job. I hate to say this, but it's in the publisher's description (and on the cover image), but one of the places that Slim shouldn't go is to dog fights. His reaction to them is visceral, and you almost feel it as much as he did as you read.

 

The characterizations are as deep and wonderful as before (including a couple of characters that'd make Flannery O'Connor balk), the evil that Slim confronts is very dark and twisted, and Slim's voice is deadly serious one minute, and seamlessly laugh-out-loud funny without giving the reader a sense of whiplash. There's some violence -- brutal stuff -- yet it's Slim's brain that does most of the work. Basically, it's the whole package.

 

The Bonus Story About Those Danged Chickens, "Hardboiled Eggs," was a hoot -- not strong enough to work as a part of the novel, but it tied in well (and best read after the book) and was nice example of Anci and Slim working together.

 

I hope there's more to come in this series, because I just can't get enough. Miller's style is great -- the prose is smooth and fluid, so much so that you don't realize just how dark and twisted the events are until it's too late because you're having too much fun reading. Take some time to visit Little Egypt and you'll see what I mean.


<img class="aligncenter" src="http://angelsguiltypleasures.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/12/2017LibraryLoveChallenge05-400x400-angelsgp.png" alt="2017 Library Love Challenge" style="border:none;height:auto;width:200px;">

Source: irresponsiblereader.com/2017/12/06/red-dog-by-jason-miller
Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2017-12-06 16:23
My Review of The Village of Eben Hollow
The Village of Eben Hollow - Jason Pacy,Brad A. Braddock

The Village of Eben Hollow by Brad A. Braddock is a story of good versus evil.

 

While I loved the title, the story held little for me. There is your usual evil sorceress, her minions, and the dead that she can raise, but the storytelling left a little to be desired. All the villagers seemed the same, all brutes and drunkards. It was easy to see where the story was headed. No mystery. Nothing that held me to the story.

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
text 2017-12-04 22:33
November 2017 Round up!
The Devoured - Jason Sprenger,Curtis M. Lawson,Curtis M. Lawson
Ash Wednesday - Chet Williamson
Deadbomb Bingo Ray - Jeff Johnson
The Travelling Grave and Other Stories - L.P. Hartley,John Howard Reid
Room - Emma Donoghue
Sweet Aswang - Anthony Hains
Childgrave - Ken Greenhall
The Happy Man: A Tale of Horror - Eric C. Higgs
The Last Werewolf - Glen Duncan
The Listener - Robert R. McCammon

I read 12 books during the month of November!

 

Audio books:

 

The Devoured by Curtis Lawson

Room by Emma Donohue

The Last Werewolf by Glen Duncan

The Silver Linings Playbook by Matthew Quick

 

Total: 4

 

ARCS:

 

Deadbomb Bingo Ray by Jeff Johnson

The Traveling Grave and Other Stories  by L.P. Hartley

Childgrave by Ken Greenhall

The Happy Man: A Tale of Horror by Eric Higgs

The Listener by Robert McCammon

 

Total: 5

 

Reads for Review:

 

Sweet Aswang by Anthony Hains

Red Room Magazine Issue One

 

Total: 2

 

Random Reads:

 

Ash Wednesday by Chet Williamson

 

Total: 1

 

READING CHALLENGES

 

Horror Aficionados Mount TBR Challenge: 

(Horror Aficionados Group on Goodreads)

Goal: Read 40 books I already own in 2017

 

 

January Count: 1

February Count: 2 

March and April Count: 0

May: 2 (Boo! and The Well)

June & July: 0

August: 1-The Talented Mr. Ripley

September: 1  Carter & Lovecraft

October: 0 (But had LOTS of fun with Halloween Bingo!)

November: 0

Running Count: 7

 

Graphic Novel Challenge:

(Paced Reading Group on GR)

Goal: Read 25 Graphic novels in 2017 

 

January count: 5

February count: 2

March count: 5

April count: 5

May count: 3

June count: 4

July count: 4

August count: 5

September: 1

October: 1

November: 0

 

Running Count: 35!

Challenge Met!

Like Reblog Comment
review 2017-11-29 17:20
Great coming-of-age story!
The Impossible Fortress - Jason Rekulak

Vanna White in Playboy that is how it all started. All Billy and his friends, Alf and Clark, wanted was to get their hands on a copy. Simple… not at all. You have to be eighteen to purchase Playboy and they are always kept behind the counter at Zelinsky’s store. After several failed attempts to lay hands on the coveted prize, they hatch a plan to steal a copy. All they need is the code to the security alarm. The plan involves Billy cozying up to Mary, the shop owner’s computer nerd daughter, and getting it from her. Billy, a computer geek himself, ends up falling for Mary. What is a guy to do? Betray his friends or betray Mary?

 

Oh, the nostalgia! The Impossible Fortress, by Jason Rekulak, brought back a lot of memories for me. The story was great and I kept rooting for Billy even though I could see he was heading for trouble. The characters were flawed but in a good way. The story was paced well so you never got bored and it did not feel rushed either. Great coming-of-age story and thoroughly enjoyable! I received a free copy in exchange for my honest review.

Source: www.thespineview.com/genre/ya/the-impossible-fortress-by-jason-rekulak
Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2017-11-24 13:58
The Watcher: Jane Goodall’s Life with the Chimps ★★★★☆
The Watcher: Jane Goodall's Life with the Chimps - Jeanette Winter

Crossing the ocean, Jane stayed on deck

and watched the waves, even when the cold wind blew.

She saw all the different blues and greens of the sea,

and fish that glowed through the dark water.

 

 

What I loved best about this little children’s book was the emphasis that was placed on Jane Goodall’s accomplishments and the characteristics of her person and work that helped her to achieve them – curiosity, determination despite hardship, and patient observation, but done in a way that was celebratory rather than preachy. I enjoyed the artwork, too, with its bright unusual colors and sense of motion. In telling Goodall’s story, the book also tells us a story about the forest in Gombe in Tanzania, where deforestation and poaching were threatening the chimpanzees with extinction, accompanied by a rather horrifying illustration of a poacher aiming a gun at a mother chimp playing with her infant chimp amid tree stumps. Although the book tries to end on a high note, that illustration is the one that stuck with me after finishing.

 

This was an ebook, borrowed from my public library. I read this for The 16 Tasks of the Festive Season, square 14: Book themes for Quaid-e-Azam:  Pakistan became an independent nation when the British Raj ended on August 14, 1947. Read a book set in Pakistan or in any other country that attained sovereign statehood between August 14, 1947 and today (regardless in what part of the world). This book is set in Tanzania, which became independent from the UK in 1961, according to Wikipedia.

More posts
Your Dashboard view:
Need help?