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review 2018-10-14 11:17
Fragments of Thought-Poems: "Das Stundenbuch" by Rainer Maria Rilke
O Livro de Horas - Rainer Maria Rilke


(original review, 2009)


Da neigt sich die Stunde und rührt mich an
mit klarem, metallenem Schlag:
mir zittern die Sinne. Ich fühle: ich kann -
und ich fasse den plastischen Tag.

Nichts war noch vollendet, eh ich es erschaut,
ein jedes Werden stand still.
Meine Blicke sind reif, und wie eine Braut
kommt jedem das Ding, das er will.

Nichts ist mir zu klein, und ich lieb es trotzdem
und mal es auf Goldgrund und groß
und halte es hoch, und ich weiß nicht wem
löst es die Seele los...


In “Das Stundenbuch” von Rainer Maria Rilke.

 

 

If you're into stuff like this, you can read the full review.

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review 2018-10-06 18:20
Ho=c/R=c/cT=1/T: "Before the Big Bang - The Prehistory of Our Universe" by Brian Clegg
Before the Big Bang: The Prehistory of Our Universe - Brian Clegg



A friend of mine many eons ago said "all we have left to do is cross the T's and dot the I's". I was skeptical then and now I just laugh. He liked to look through a telescope and he believed what he thought he saw. There has been a theory put forward, describing the moment of and just after the big bang, when not only was matter flung outwards from the explosion, but the basic geometric substance of "space" was also stretched and may even have been CREATED at that point. It's like 2 grapes in a bowl of jello - stretch the jello and those grapes move apart.

 

 

If you're into stuff like this, you can read the full review.

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review 2018-09-28 19:45
Drachenfutter: "Aforismos" by Frank Kafka, Álvaro Gonçalves (translator)
Aforismos - Escritos na localidade histórica de Zurau - Franz Kafka,Álvaro Gonçalves


(original review, 2009)

The Portuguese etymological dictionary of Jose Pedro Machado informs that the word aphorism derives from the Greek and arrived at the Portuguese language through late Latin aphorismu-, with the meaning of "limitation, brief definition, sentence". It adds that, in time (already documented in the 16th century), the term has come to be called "a brief and indisputable sentence, which sums up a doctrine."

Kafka resorted to the aphorism, what he called “Schreiben als Form des Gebetes” in his conversations (for example, with the poet Gustav Janouch, author of the book “Conversations with Kafka”, 1953) and in the course of his career as a writer. One of the main collections of these "short and indisputable sentences" was published in the small posthumous book “Er”, from the diary notes that the writer kept from 1909 to 1923-24.

 

 

If you're into stuff like this, you can read the full review.

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review 2018-06-23 19:38
The Caboose Who Got Loose by Bill Peet
The Caboose Who Got Loose - Bill Peet

Title:  The Caboose Who Got Loose

Author:  Bill Peet

Genre:  Trains / Traveling / Children's / Adventure


Year Published: 1971


Year Read:  2009

Publisher:  
Houghton Mifflin Company

Source:  Library

Content Rating:  Ages 4+  (Nothing Objectionable)

 

 

Caboose

“The Caboose Who Got Loose” is a great story from the creative mind of Bill Peet about a small caboose named Katy who wants to escape her life as a caboose and live happily in a peaceful place. “The Caboose Who Got Loose” may be a bit tedious for some children, but it is still a cute little story nonetheless. 

Bill Peet’s story about a caboose who wants to live a peaceful life in the countryside is a great tale for many children. Children will feel for Katy’s sadness at being a mere caboose and not having a peaceful life of her own. Bill Peet’s writing is highly creative as he narrates the story in a rhyming prose that fits the mood of the story perfectly. Bill Peet’s illustrations are always the highlights in his books and this is certainly no exception. The characters are drawn in a similar fashion as “The Brave Little Toaster” as the cabooses and the houses have windows for eyes. 

Caboose

“The Caboose Who Got Loose” is a cute story about how one must be satisfied with what life brings us and will definitely interest many children who love books about trains and how to love life. I would recommend this book to children ages four and up since there is nothing inappropriate about the story.

Review is also on: Rabbit Ears Book Blog

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review SPOILER ALERT! 2018-06-23 19:13
The Spooky Tail of Prewitt Peacock by Bill Peet
The Spooky Tail of Prewitt Peacock - Bill Peet

Title:  The Spooky Tail of Prewitt Peacock

Author:  Bill Peet

Genre:  Animals / Bullying / Children's / Individuality


Year Published: 1973


Year Read:  2009

Publisher:  
Houghton Mifflin Company

Source:  Library

Content Rating:  Ages 6+  (Bullying)

 

 

Peacock

“The Spooky Tail of Prewitt Peacock” is a children’s book about self-confidence from the popular children’s author, Bill Peet. This book details Prewitt’s, a peacock, dilemma when his tail, at first was scrawny, becomes a horrifying looking tail over a matter of days! This children’s book is truly a unique treat to read as you would never imagine a tail forming into a scary face over time and that will definitely catch any child’s attention. 

Bill Peet does an excellent job with both the illustrations and the writing for the story. Bill Peet’s illustrations are vibrant and beautiful as he effectively draws the trees in the jungle in a scraggly way. The image that is the highlight in this book is the image of Prewitt’s tail. Prewitt’s tail is certainly a sight to see as Bill Peet draws Prewitt’s tail with two angry looking blue eyes and a frightening looking jagged mouth with sharp looking greenish teeth. Also, I thought that the clutching feathery claws added an even spookier effect as they really look like they are going to grab you real quick. Bill Peet’s writing is excellent as he tells the story of a peacock named Prewitt who at first lost confidence in himself because of his tail, but then gains it back when he realizes that his scary looking tail makes him unique from the other peacocks. I also loved the way that Prewitt defended his tail against the other peacocks stating that he would rather have a tai that is scary-looking than to have no tail. 

Peacock

Parents should know that the way that the other peacocks mistreated Prewitt because of his tail might concern young children. Even after Prewitt’s tail had grown, the other peacocks still mistreated Prewitt because his tail was different from the others. But, the story does have a happy ending as the other peacocks learn to accept Prewitt’s “special” tail after it saves their lives. Parents should discuss to their children about the importance of individuality as Prewitt expresses his individuality by standing up for his tail.

“The Spooky Tail of Prewitt Peacock” is probably one of Bill Peet’s most lovable books as it expresses the value of individuality. I would recommend this book to children ages six and up since this book would be a tad bit too long for smaller children to get through.


Review is also on: Rabbit Ears Book Blog

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