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text 2018-01-16 11:00
Teaser Tuesday: The Chosen
Black Magic (Women Writers of Urban Fantasy #1) - S.J. Davis,Rue Volley,Faith Marlow,Lily Luchesi,Sarah Hall,Nicole Thorn,Laurencia Hoffman,Elizabeth A. Lance,Elaine White

 

The Chosen

smarturl.it/BlackMagicWWS

Charity Anthology for Meals on Wheels

#MM #PNR #BlackMagic #lgbtq #indieauthor #supernatural

 

 

~

 

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review 2018-01-15 01:40
The Chimera (Bound Gods #1) by Adrienne Wilder
The Chimera - Adrienne Wilder

Frigging brilliant! My only complaint is that Kaleb is not suffering the change of scenery enough. He must have had friends, he must have had hopes and ambitions and plans, like being in college, obtaining freedom from his father. Maybe the reality is yet to settle in? :D

Looking forward to the next installment.

PS 
There are problems with editing, but I am choosing to ignore them since they were not too bad.
Mixed up "he, she" in reference to Kaleb's trans male brother drove me bonkers. There should be "He" in this book with this particular set of characters, no way around it. 

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review 2018-01-14 22:50
Angel 1089 (Heaven Corp. #1) by C.C. Bridges
Angel 1089 - C.C. Bridges

For the life of me I could not connect with any of the characters. Some of them, I don't even know why they are there. Actually, I don't know why half the book is there.

I don't understand the world, there are bits of this and that and a glimpse of something else.

But why is the sun not shining outside the city? Why do soldiers (that's what angels are) live at the very top guarding warehouses, why not the richest and most privileged strolling through their high rise palaces?

Where is Rocco? I hoped Gabriel would recognize him in one of the other angels, or other modded. If Rocco loved Gabriel, he would have followed him and met the same (or almost) fate.

Jeff... nothing solid on him either.

I mean, you take every single character and they are just floundering around, barely afloat, flicking in and out of their cartoon-ish existence.

Someone told me not to bother with this book. It was on "my friends said no" shelf for a long time. But then I needed it for a challenge *ugh* I will NOT be buying book 2. 

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review 2018-01-14 01:51
Audio Book Review: Greatshadow
Greatshadow: Book One of the Dragon Apocalypse - James Maxey

*I was given this free review copy audiobook at my request and have voluntarily left this review.

4.5 stars
A cool addition in listening to the audiobook for me, we get small sound effects! There's a noise that matches the waterfall, lightly in the background to give us the feel of the story with the narration. I enjoyed the sly or laid back, knowing voice of the clientele at Black Swan that he used. Very fitting of the characters! I found I really enjoyed Jake as the narrator for this book. He felt to bring life to the words and characters as he spoke. When listening to audiobooks, sometimes a wonderful thing happens - you don't even know you are listening. Yep, it happened here. Jake told the story with what felt to be the characters personalities and lived in their emotions. This brings a book to a whole fourth dimension that's enjoyable for us.

We start off with seeing Stagger and Infidel in their full character as they escape a lava pygmy temple. How they escape says a lot about their personalities and friendship. Also gives us a action start to bring us into the world with them. I totally loved it. I was sold on the daring characters from the opening.

Infidel is one brutal woman! I love it! She's magically strong and seems to have no fear with her strength as she does withstand some heavy events and keeps on going. Infidel comes to a realization early in the book and grows from it as we move through events. Infidel feels to have been a person in need of healing, and didn't realize it until she lost one person dear to her. Wonderful writing for Infidel and her growth.

I very much enjoyed the story from the beginning. It's told from Stagger's view of things happening. I was pleasantly surprised at how well everything fits as we watch and experience with him. We interact with many different beings from Ogre to dwarf and magic inclined people. And of course, dragons. Very interesting world.

The story plot has an overall slower pace like traditional fantasy. But it's what happens in those moments that are amazing. Even though the plot is slower, the story is far from it. We get to see the world and know the characters through adventure and danger. There is magic and different beings present that we get to meet through actions. I even found I got to smile and chuckle at this story. When you meet Reeker and get to witness what he can do, you'll be smiling too. lol.

I found it interesting how the characters on the journey to kill Greatshadow have their lives intertwined with this adventure. We learn a great deal about them and face dangers as we journey, and I didn't realize that we were still working to get to the dragon. I didn't feel as though the book needed to skip ahead or anything. I truly enjoyed the story from the view point we got it.

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review 2017-12-27 19:28
Snakes are mentioned
Terminal Alliance (Janitors of the Post-Apocalypse) - Jim C. Hines

I am the type of person who wonders where the bath rooms are on the Enterprise and the Death Star.  Sure, the Falcon has neat hiding holes, but how are the toilet systems?  Does the head have a seat beat?  And how did Luke go to the bathroom on his way to Cloud City or wherever?  Does the transporter take care of bodily functions? 

 

                IN part this is curiosity, in part this is because I would be the one losing her lunch in the bathroom, so I really want to know.

 

                Hines’ latest book is about those on such famous ships who rarely get mention and never get thought about – the janitors.  In other words, Finn before he got sent to a planet where he didn’t like killing people unless they were people he knew.

 

                (Sorry, I like Finn.  In many ways, his reactions later in the movie are the most realistic, but that beginning sequence does Finn’s character a disservice.  He is cheering killing people he knows).

 

                Mops is a human in charge of a cleaning crew on the Pufferfish (the ships in this novel are named after the deadliest animals in human history).  The human race has go through a collapse, not so much destroying everyone, but turning everyone feral (like zombies but not dead).  The Krakau have developed a cure for this temperament, and humans who are cured work as mercs.  The species has a reputation for stupidity, toughness, and blood thirstiness.  Unfortunately for Pufferfish, on a recent assignment, the majority of the human crew has gone feral.  The only ones who haven’t are Mops and her crew: Kumar, Monroe, and Mozart.  There is also Puffy, who is more of hinderance, and Grom who is like centipede.  Mops is determined to find out what happen and to cure her crewmates, leading to the adventure story that is the book.

 

                Being a Hines book, there is much laughter.  Part of it comes from the use of names, cured humans take names of famous people.  So, Monroe, for instance, is named for Marylin.  There are also the various reactions to human things, such as a dig at erotica.  For the reader, there is the added bonus of reading being forefront in the story.  

 

                Truthfully, at the start the book is a bit slow and one of the big reveals, isn’t really a surprise for the careful reader (and Hines doesn’t treat it as such, to be fair).  Yet, this book is also one of those books that illustrates the strengths of sci-fi, in particular humorous sci-fi.

 

                The treatment of humans in the novel by other alien species is basically any ism that is in society today or in the past.  Some of the comments, for instance, you have seen in the descriptions of Africans by Europeans or white slave owners.  Hines is also getting the reader to think about how knowledge is transmitted or not transmitted; in fact, he tackles several big questions in this book.  By doing so, quite frankly, he cements his place as America’s Terry Pratchett, who also dealt with big questions in funny ways. 

               

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