logo
Wrong email address or username
Wrong email address or username
Incorrect verification code
back to top
Search tags: Discworld
Load new posts () and activity
Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2017-05-19 23:16
Review: Raising Steam (Discworld Book 48 of 49ish)
Raising Steam (Discworld) - Terry Pratchett

Raising Steam is the third and final book in the Moist Von Lipwig subseries of Discworld, and the second-to-last book in the entire series.  In this book, we meet a new character by the name of Simnel who has invented the steam engine and introduced the concept of fast travel by train.  Meanwhile, there is more unrest between the traditional and modern dwarfs.

 

This book spends a lot of time talking about trains: building trains and railways, operating trains, the benefits of trains, train safety, and so forth.  This is not, to me, a particularly exciting topic, and sometimes I had trouble pushing through the book.  I was interested enough that I didn’t want to abandon it, especially not so close to the end of the series, but it put me to sleep a few times.  I was also on my second week of business travel and pretty worn out in any case, so maybe this had as much to do with me as it had to do with the book.

 

Vetinari, a character I’ve greatly enjoyed since his first introduction, gets quite a bit of page time in this book, but for some reason he didn’t seem like Vetinari to me.  Normally he’s more taciturn.  He manipulates and influences people with a few pointed words, with silence and perhaps some intimidating looks, and with visual aids.  That's one of the reasons I enjoy his character so much.  In this book, he had a tendency toward detailed monologues and explanations, and there were one or two weird sections where he sounded like the CEO of a company using corporate buzzwords.

 

It wasn’t a bad book, and there were parts I enjoyed, but it wasn’t at the level I’ve come to expect from the Discworld books.  Combine that with a topic I wasn’t that interested in, and I just didn’t enjoy this as much as the previous books.

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2017-05-19 02:57
Jingo by Terry Pratchett
Jingo (Discworld, #21) - Terry Pratchett

Series: Discworld #21

 

The island Leshp rises from the sea, kind of like an anti-Atlantis, and both Klatch and Ankh-Morpork try to lay claim to it. There’s a real risk of both countries going to war and Commander Vimes is investigating the attempted assassination of Prince Khufurah. This doesn’t explain this book or what I liked about it, but that’s difficult to do without quoting half the book. It’s a commentary on war with layers upon layers of jokes, and it’s one of my personal favourites from the Discworld series.  There’s the Watch with Vimes, Carrot, Cheery, Detritus, and Angua as well as a larger than usual role for Vetinari although he still manages to put one over everyone (surprise, surprise).

 

I read this for booklikes-opoly square Frontierland 4 “Read a book where a character travels by boat” since as well as being next up in my Discworld reread, Vimes and others travel by ship over the sea while others (spoilers!) travel by boat under the sea. There’s an unusual amount of travelling by boat for a Discworld novel considering the Unseen University sculling team races by running on the river Ankh while carrying their boat (I forget what they call the sport because it’s not described in this book).

 

At 406 pages of text (414 pages minus the 8 pages before the book properly starts), this grants me another $5 for my bank, bringing my total to $87.

 

Previous update: 184/414 pages

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2017-05-19 00:42
Night Watch (Discworld #29, Watch #6)
Night Watch (Discworld, #29) - Terry Pratchett

The past and future of Ankh-Morpork revolve around the efforts of His Grace Sir Sam Vimes, Commander of the City Watch, and he doesn’t like it one bit.  Night Watch, the sixth book focusing on the City Watch and twenty-ninth overall book of Terry Pratchett’s Discworld series finds Vimes dealing with his wife about to give birth, the deaths of two of his two officers and chasing the man responsible, then finding himself in the past playing the mentor to his younger self during a time of revolution.

 

Sam Vimes loves being a copper, but not so much His Grace when things have to be official, but after a magical “accident” caused by the Monks of History to send him 30 years into the past Vimes must make sure history happens like it did when he was a 17-year old newbie.  Becoming his mentor Sergeant John Keel and second-in-command at his old Watch House, Vimes attempts to bring about the past he remembers so his “present” remains the same.  Unfortunately for Vimes, a genius yet insane killer Carcer was brought back with him and has his own agenda—chaos and murder.  Add in a revolution hitting Ankh-Morpork and Vimes is in for some very stressful days.

 

This isn’t the first time that Pratchett has done a little time travel in a Discworld novel, but it was the first in which it was the primary element in one.  Vimes becoming the heroic mentor to his younger self, is somewhat cliché but Pratchett uses Vimes own grim view of the world to an advantage as starts to become imprinted on young Sam.  Yet, Vimes existential fretting about messing up his future does get tiresome after him doing it so many times in the book that it almost seems that Pratchett was finding ways to take up page space.

 

Night Watch is an action-packed installment in the Discworld series that Pratchett writes fantastically with Sam Vimes as the protagonist, even with the overused existential fretting.  Once again I’ve found a Watch book bringing out the best of Pratchett and the entire Discworld setting, I can only hope the other two books of the subseries will be the same.

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
text 2017-05-18 13:35
Reading progress update: I've read 184 out of 414 pages.
Jingo (Discworld, #21) - Terry Pratchett

Really I've been wanting to quote half the book in updates, but I just haven't had the time. I suppose I should dedicate one of my Discworld rereads to quotes. But I'll share this one with you:

'My strength is as the strength of ten because my heart is pure,' said Carrot.

'Really? Well, there's eleven of them.'

You gotta love Angua. She balances out Carrot so nicely.

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
text 2017-05-18 05:59
Discworld - view from cosmos

Look what I found on one of the Russian sites: Discworld.

Unfortunately I don't know who created this picture.

More posts
Your Dashboard view:
Need help?